Fremont Tugboat Co.

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Latest Fremont Tugboat Newsletter Sept/08     

 

MARK FREEMAN’S “RUDDERLESS” OCTOBER 19, 2014

CAPTAIN MARK.

CAPTAIN MARK.

 

 

 

OUR LOGO THANKS TO JOHNNY ADAMS WHO DREW IT AND BILL GARDEN GAVE ME PERMISSION TO USE IT AS HE DID FOR MANY YEARS.

OUR LOGO THANKS TO JOHNNY ADAMS WHO DREW IT AND BILL GARDEN GAVE ME PERMISSION TO USE IT AS HE DID FOR MANY YEARS.

SAD NEWS FROM THE BURCHETT FAMILY, ARTHUR BURCHETT PASSED AWAY AT AGE 88 ON OCTOBER 6, 2014.  HE LEAVES BEHIND BOTH A LOVING FAMILY AND A LONG MARITIME HERITAGE. A WONDERFUL ARTICLE WAS WRITTEN ON THEIR THREE GENERATIONS IN THE FEBRUARY, 2013 BC SHIPPING NEWS.  BCSN-Feb13-BurchettFamily

 

Arthur, Shawn and Ron Burchett

ARTHUR,  SHAWN AND RON BURCHETT

CONDOLENCES FROM ALL OF US TO RON AND HIS FAMILY.

PAT HASKETT, WELL KNOWN NORTH WEST ARTIST DIED LAST MONTH. HIS FUNERAL WAS AT THE MUSEUM AT FORT LEWIS.  I HAVE SOME PICTURES THAT I TOOK OF HIM TOWING A LOG RAFT IN THE SOUTH SOUND WITH HIS TUG THE SALLY S AND AN AD AND A PICTURE OF HIM ONBOARD THE ST. EVAL AND THREE ORIGINALS OIL PAINTINGS TO SHARE WITH YOU..

 

SALLY S IN SOUTH SOUND.

SALLY S IN SOUTH SOUND.

 

AD FROM PAT HASKETT.

AD FROM PAT HASKETT.

 

PAT HASKETT

PAT HASKETT

 

SALLY S AND CREW WAITING FOR THE TIDE TO TURN.FROM LEFT KG , PAT HASKETT & DEBBY HASKETT PAT IS HOLDING FISHCAKE THEIR CAT. PHPOTO BY JOHN TYICZAK.

SALLY S AND CREW WAITING FOR THE TIDE TO TURN. FROM LEFT KG , PAT HASKETT & DEBBY HASKETT PAT IS HOLDING FISHCAKE THEIR CAT. PHOTO BY JOHN TYICZAK.

 

IF YOU HAVE NEVER SEEN A PAT HASKETT ORIGINAL HERE ARE THREE VERY GOOD ONES.

 

SEASPAN SOVEREIGN MY FAVORITE HASKETT IT SITS OVER MY DESK IN MY OFFICE.

SEASPAN SOVEREIGN. MY FAVORITE HASKETT IT SITS OVER MY DESK IN MY OFFICE.

 

THE TUG OCEANIC OFF GIBRALTAR YOU CAN SMELL THE LUBE OIL AND THE FUEL OIL FROM HER PASSING. SHE IS JUST STARTING TO DID INTO THE BIG ATLANTIC SWELL.

THE TUG OCEANIC OFF GIBRALTAR. YOU CAN SMELL THE LUBE OIL AND THE FUEL OIL FROM HER PASSING. SHE IS JUST STARTING TO DIG INTO THE BIG ATLANTIC SWELL.

 

GERMAN NAVY SAILORS WATCHING THE GERMAN BATTLESHIP BIZMARK SLIDE BY.

GERMAN NAVY SAILORS WATCHING THE GERMAN BATTLESHIP BISMARCK SLIDE BY.

 

1952:  It was both a good and bad year - of course aren’t they all. I finally graduated from Lincoln High School in February 1952 at age 17 - I would be 18 in March and subject to the draft. I was in either the last mid-term class or 2nd to the last as they used to start schooling in September and January; now I understand it is only in September. I was never so bored in all my life - they never taught anything about boats. The one class that I did enjoy was Ernie Osgood’s lettering class for sign painting because I used that all the time; the rest of it, forget it. I hated gym classes and somehow I worked a deal with the school to get an early dismissal at noon with work credits – I would do anything to not have to sit thru those boring classes. My classmates thought that I was nuts being in business for myself and owning a tug. Of course some of them must think that they are still in school or want to be because they keep having these reunions which I have never attended. I knew where my compass was pointing and it had nothing to do with high school.

The only good thing was when I was 16 I bought a model A Ford for $125 dollars so I didn’t have to walk or bike to school because that was boring too; it only took me 15 or 20 minutes to walk it but after going the same route after 4 years I knew every step of the way. My dad bought the schooner ADVENTURESS from the San Francisco Bar Pilots at the end of the year and he had Jack McCrary and Ed Anderson getting her ready for the trip up the coast to Seattle. Guess who didn’t get to go? That’s right, me! My one and only chance to come up the coast on a sailing vessel and you guessed it there was a big conflict between taking my finals and the trip up the coast. My folks said “No. You have to finish your schooling.” And you want to know something - I am still mad about that one. Then when she got here after a very eventful trip the clutch broke and dad used my tug the JERKMORE to tow her in to Fremont Boat… because I was still taking finals, good heavens. I remember after my last class walking down Stone Way Avenue with Joe Caulfield discussing what our next life would be and how nothing would ever be the same and it wasn’t. I talked to Joe maybe twice more in my lifetime and I never looked back.

Without having to go to school I devoted full time to my tugboat career and working for dad. Beachcombing was good and I did a certain amount of log spill work which was always interesting. I have bills from February, 1952 for Seaboard Lumber Company, a big mill up the Duwamish River. I picked up 75 logs that were lost from their Silverdale Boom Ground and I remember running up to the Port Ludlow log storage in the middle of the night so I could go to work at first light. Off Kingston I almost got run down by this big halibut schooner type the ARTHUR H.  I could not figure out why he almost hit me so I got to checking my running lights and my red light was out. Another lesson: check your running lights every half hour. I rounded Point No Point and there was a big ground swell running out of the north - kind of spooky. A boom stick had broken and I got 25 logs off the beach and re-rafted them and put a strap on the broken boom stick.  In March I beachcomed logs that spilled from the raft that the P&T PIONEER was towing at Shilshole. During the spring I was beachcombing in Hoods Canal and Boyer had me yard an 8 section raft to him outside Pleasant Harbor where he was making up a tow. My brother-in-law, Pat Stoppelman, was also towing rafts at that time that Toughie Gore was building at the log dump in Pleasant Harbor for Seaboard Lumber. He was towing them into the Port Ludlow log storage from Pleasant Harbor.

In the spring Dick Ballinger and I took the JERKMORE to the San Juan Islands to look for logs. We did quite a bit of prospecting but we could not find any logs so we went to Friday Harbor where I hired Bob Savage and his float plane to look for more logs… and we could not find any that way either - but it was a fun ride in his seaplane. On the way back from Friday Harbor in the boat we ran into these fellows that were towing a big bag of logs in Spring Passage and we stopped to talk to them. That conversation ended up with me being hired by them to help make up log rafts. They were Sherman Thompson and Bill (Mississippi) Tolar and they did the booming for Shaw Island Logging owned by Arden and Allen White. The deal was they would have me and my tug help them put rafts together and I would do all the outside towing and I would be paid for booming the same way they were per thousand board foot. They were so busy and so far behind that they needed help. They both lived in Deer Harbor. Sherman had lived there most of his life and was married to Lucille and they had two teen age kids Betty and Clifford Alan. Mississippi had been in the Navy at Whidbey Island and had seen Deer Harbor once he loved what he saw and when he got out of the Navy he settled there, he was married to Ruth Norton and they had a son Billie. Sherman had the VERDUN a converted fish boat with a 135 horsepower Universal with a big reduction gear and Mississippi owned the STUBBY which was a 20 foot boom boat that the boat builder Chet North had built for him at Deer Harbor. She had a 115 horsepower Chrysler Crown. They both knew my dad and had purchased gear from him so it seemed like old home week.

Shaw Island Logging dumped logs anywhere that they could build a log dump. It had to have a road into it for the logging trucks and it had to have enough water at high tide to float the logs. If it was out in the open then the bags of logs had to come into a sheltered harbor where they could be made into towable rafts with top swifters on them. That’s what was happening: they were dumping logs on the west side of Orcas Island and they were towing the bags into Deer Harbor to be made into log rafts. Usually a big tug from Bellingham would come over to pick up several rafts like the BARNEY JR. or the DIVIDEND or the PALOMAR. There wasn’t enough work for Dick so he caught the ferry at Orcas and went home. So I started to learn another trade - how to build log rafts. I was becoming a boom man. I did not have any caulk boots because in beachcombing all you used were hip boots as you had to go ashore all the time and wade thru the water. So I worked slick shod till I went back to Seattle to get my car and I went over to Buffalo Shoe Mfg. on Eastlake and bought a pair of caulk boots for $50.00 and, yes, I still have them. $50.00 was a lot of money in those days when I was getting $7.50 an hour for me and the tug. Sometimes we worked where there were a row of piling that we could tie the raft to; sometimes we had to put a boat on each side and punch the bag into a more rectangular shape and run swifter lines and start working the logs so that you ended up with a raft about 70 feet wide and 4 to 8 sections long. Boom sticks are about 66 feet long and the loggers would cut the long logs in the woods  and then dump them in the water and we would take them over to the flats where they would go dry at low tide and then we would drill the 4 inch hole in each end with a chain saw with a drilling attachment trying to get the hole as close to 90 degrees when the log floated. When you had part of the raft shaped up to the right width with the logs in tight we would pull the first top swifter or top rider, which was a boom stick, up on top of the raft at the first joint, We did not have a winch on a raft so we used a tug to pull the top swifter in place.

You would position the boom stick alongside the raft overlapping the joint and run your towline across the raft, hook the chain in the end of the tow line around the end of the boom stick and pull hard enough to get the boom stick started across the raft. You had to do it just right to end up with the other end of the boom stick centered above the joint with the hole directly above the boom chain. Then you had another chain threaded around the boom chain that holds the side sticks together and you inserted that up thru the hole in the top rider and then you pulled the top swifter tight against the chain.

This got the first part of the problem done. Now you had to rig a strap around the top rider towards the end of it and shackle a snatch block into the strap and take the end of the towline and shackle the end of it into the chain that held the side sticks together and lead it back thru the snatch block so that when you pulled on your towline it brought the hole in the end of the top rider directly over the side stick chain; then you pulled the chain attached to the side stick chain up into the hole in the end of the top rider and let the toggle lay straight across, stop pulling and your raft should be nice and tight.  You put a top swifter at every joint and one across the front and back section in about the middle of the section. It was hard to get it just right and easier if the raft was tied up to piling otherwise sometimes you had to have the other tug hold the raft in position. Log rafts were built with top swifters for rough weather and in calmer waters the swifters were in the water, still at each joint. Flat rafts don’t like wind and waves - anytime it starts to blow at 15 miles per hour you better have it figured out where you were going to hide because you would start losing logs. This was before log bundles were used.

Anyway, I had a steady job at what I liked to do and Sherman and Mississippi treated me like one of the family. I got to know everyone in Deer Harbor and had friends all over the Island. I even went to my first dance at the Grange Hall in Deer Harbor where they had regular dances and it was all very social and friendly. I learned the currents around the Islands and how to build log rafts. In the couple of years that I was in the Islands we dumped logs at Reid Harbor, on the North shore of Orcas, Mail Bay on Waldron Island – Bob Hurt’s Logging Show, West Sound on Orcas, Blind Bay on Shaw Island and another spot on the east side of Shaw, south Lopez Island and at the head of East Sound. I also boomed logs at Thatcher Bay on Blakely Island for Will Ritchie but I think that was in 1953. I towed out of all these spots plus many other locations and once we took the three boats and towed an 8 section raft to Bellingham which was sure interesting. When I was in Seattle, which wasn’t very often, my folks talked to me about going to college which I had prepared for in high school. My mother graduated from the University of Washington in 1924 with honors in Business Administration and my dad had an 8th grade education and he was smarter than anyone I ever met so I was thinking about further schooling and also the draft was lurking since I had gotten my 1-A draft card in the mail. (When you turned 18 you had to sign up for the draft - of course I was having way too much fun to think very seriously about anything.)

Another tugboat race in Seattle was coming up on May 24, 1952 and I was going to be in it. Byron Fish, reporter for the Times, was already picking on me, what fun. In one of his articles he wrote ‘that the JERKMORE is noted for its tidal wave and its square bow and last year a foaming wave came splashing across the finish line in 6th place. When it subsided the judges were surprised to see the JERKMORE emerge.’ I again would be the youngest skipper and owner. I ran the JERKMORE to Seattle and Betty Thompson drove down and got on the tug for the race. I came in 4th  - pretty good for a landing barge and the papers described me as ‘the submarine entry of the tugboat races’ because I was under water more than above water. In June I received a Certificate of Merit from the Propeller Club of the United States plus I got another engraved brass plate. I ended up with 4 of them and they are all mounted on a varnished board and they are up for display in the BLUEBERRY. I ran back to the Islands and went back to work booming logs and towing and going to dances and just having a good time.

In July I helped Ray & Jenny Stickler with the KLATAWA from Thatcher Bay on Blakely Island across Rosario Strait into Alice Bight and thru Deception pass with a double wide log raft. Ray was an old friend as he towed for dad and he bought dads’ tug the KLATAWA. I also renewed my Log Patrol license with Joe & Lynn. I continued booming logs, working for Sherman & Mississippi and towing - I had become a part of the community. However, I had to make a decision: it was either the draft or college, so I started in as a freshman at the UW as a pre-major for Ocean Transportation.

I joined the Army ROTC as the Navy would not take me because I had a bum knee. I have to tell you my heart wasn’t in it. The UW was just a glorified high school but I said that I would tough it out till I got to my major. Of course I was still in the Tugboat Business and I was back working for my dad part time and beachcombing a few logs on school vacations but let’s face it I am not a student. The only A that I got was in a sailing class; all the rest of my grades reflected my non interest. All of dad’s friends that hadn’t been a success said “stay with it and you will be a success.” I thought I was already and would someone define success for me? You should have seen me in an army uniform, though. We had great parades and squads left and squads right. In November I was in Hoods Canal and Fay Hopkins, skipper of the EDITH FOSS, lost logs near Brown Point and asked for help. I salvaged 23 St. Paul logs for him and I got to ride along on the EDITH FOSS. It was always fun to be on a real tug with a hot oil stove and a head. I also helped Pat Stoppelman with a log tow. He was headed for Port Ludlow when the wind came up a gale and we got him into protection under Teekalet Bluff and tailed him out of Pleasant Harbor with a double wide raft which will just barely fit out of the entrance at high tide. I have a note in the 1952 scrap book that says Total Footage from April 5, 1950 to December 1952 is 235,980 board feet. Total number of logs was 990. There were 5 peeler logs that totaled 5,000 board feet. The average log was 238 board feet. I was in Deer Harbor for a little socializing during Christmas vacation. Boy that was a busy year for me.

 

 

EDITH FOSS AT DECEPTION PASS YOU CAN SEE HOW THE TOP SWIFTERS HELP KEEP THE LOGS IN THE RAFT.

EDITH FOSS AT DECEPTION PASS. YOU CAN SEE HOW THE TOP SWIFTERS HELP KEEP THE LOGS IN THE RAFT.

 

TWO SECTION TOP SWIFTER LOG RAFT SHOWING DETAILS.

TWO SECTION TOP SWIFTER LOG RAFT SHOWING DETAILS. (THAT’S 70′ TO 80′ SQUARE, TWO  TIMES.)

 

PULLING TOP SWIFTERS WITH A BOOM BOAT.

PULLING TOP SWIFTERS WITH A BOOM BOAT.

 

WATER SWIFTER LOG RAFT.

WATER SWIFTER LOG RAFT.

 

BEACHCOMB RAFT MAKEUP.

BEACHCOMB RAFT MAKE UP.

 

BAG BOOM FOR LOG SALVAGE.

BAG BOOM FOR LOG SALVAGE.

 

ADVENTERESS AT SEA

ADVENTURESS AT SEA

 

JERKMORE TOWING THE ADVENTURES THRU THE FREMONT BRIDGE

JERKMORE TOWING THE ADVENTURES THRU THE FREMONT BRIDGE

 

BILL TO SEABOARD LUMBER FOR PICKING UP 73 LOGS FEB. 18 1952

BILL TO SEABOARD LUMBER FOR PICKING UP 73 LOGS FEB. 18, 1952.

 

SALVAGING 23 LOGS AT PORT LUDLOW. 2-11-52

SALVAGING 23 LOGS AT PORT LUDLOW. 2-11-52

 

P&T PIONEER SPILL AT SHILSHOLE. 3-9-52

P&T PIONEER SPILL AT SHILSHOLE. 3-9-52

 

YARDING 8 SEC FOR BOYER IN HOODS CANAL,

YARDING 8 SECTIONS FOR BOYER IN HOODS CANAL.

 

AD FOR GM 6-110 IN ON-TIME AND BOYER 4-52 PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAG.

AD FOR GM 6-110 IN ON-TIME.  BOYER HALVORSEN 4-52 PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

 

SEATTLE TUGBOAT RACE. FROM SEATTLE TIMES 5-52

SEATTLE TUGBOAT RACE. FROM SEATTLE TIMES 5-52

 

JERKMORE IN 4TH PLACE

JERKMORE IN 4TH PLACE

 

THE SUBMARINE JERKMORE.

THE SUBMARINE JERKMORE.

 

RACE RESULTS 5-52

RACE RESULTS 5-52

 

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT FROM PROPELLER CLUB.

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT FROM PROPELLER CLUB.

 

SHERMAN'S FLOAT IN DEER HARBOR WITH JERKMORE AND VERDUN AT THE END OF THE FLOAT.

SHERMAN’S FLOAT IN DEER HARBOR WITH JERKMORE AND VERDUN AT THE END OF THE FLOAT.

 

VERDUN IN DEER HARBOR.

VERDUN IN DEER HARBOR.

 

SHERMAN THOMPSON. 5-52

SHERMAN THOMPSON. 5-52

 

SHERMAN AT EAST SOUND LOG DUMP.

SHERMAN AT EAST SOUND LOG DUMP.

 

MISSISSIPPI AND HIS BOOM BOAT STUBY.

MISSISSIPPI AND HIS BOOM BOAT STUBBY.

 

HEAD OF REID HARBOR 5-52 PUTTING BOOM STICKS TOGETHER,

HEAD OF REID HARBOR 5-52 PUTTING BOOM STICKS TOGETHER.

 

BARBARA LENDERSMITH, MARK AND BETTY THOMPSON YOU CANT WORK ALL THE TIME.

BARBARA LENDERSMITH, MARK FREEMAN AND BETTY THOMPSON. YOU CAN’T WORK ALL THE TIME. 8-52.

 

FROM THE LEFT AUNT MILDRED, DOC & MOTHER AT MILLERS BAY 6-52

FROM THE LEFT AUNT MILDRED, DOC & MOTHER AT MILLERS BAY 6-52.

 

LOG TOW JERKMORE HAD LOTS OF WHEEL WASH BUT NOT MUCH PULL.

LOG TOW JERKMORE HAD LOTS OF WHEEL WASH BUT NOT MUCH PULL.

 

 

STORY ON ME BY HARRY KIRWIN THAT WAS IN THE MARINE DIGEST MAG. 6-1952. THE 1941 DATE ISW WRONG SHOULE BE 1948.

STORY ON ME BY HARRY KIRWIN THAT WAS IN THE MARINE DIGEST MAG. 6-1952. THE 1941 DATE IS WRONG, IT SHOULD BE 1948.

 

 

6-2 JUNE 1952   02.51.50

 

ON THE VERDUN FROM THE LEFT MISSISSIPPI, BILL KELTON. CLIFF THOMPSON AND SHERMAN THOMPSON.

ON THE VERDUN FROM THE LEFT MISSISSIPPI, BILL KELTON. CLIFF THOMPSON AND SHERMAN THOMPSON. 6-52

 

BILL FOR TOWING 51 BOOM STICKS TO VARIOUS SITES 6-6-52

INVOICE FOR TOWING 51 BOOM STICKS TO VARIOUS SITES 6-6-52

 

TUG KLATAWA LYING IN THATCHER BAY WAITING FOR THE RIGHT TIDE AND WEATHER TO CROSS ROSARIO STRAIT WITH A LOG TOW. FROM LEFT LAUREN HUCKINS, RAY & JENNY STICKLER. KLATAWA HAD A 6-71 ON A 4 1/2 TO 1 GEAR. JERKMORE IS ALONGSIDE HER. 7-52

TUG KLATAWA LYING IN THATCHER BAY WAITING FOR THE RIGHT TIDE AND WEATHER TO CROSS ROSARIO STRAIT WITH A LOG TOW. FROM LEFT LAUREN HUCKINS, RAY & JENNY STICKLER. KLATAWA HAD A 6-71 ON A 4 1/2 TO 1 GEAR. JERKMORE IS ALONGSIDE HER. 7-52

 

HERE WE ARE JUST STARTING THRU DECPTION PASS WITH OUR LOF TOW. I AM TAILING THE RAFT THRU SO THAT IT DOESEN GET HUNG UP ON GOBLERS KNOB. ONCE I GOT RAY THRU I THEN TURNED AROUND AND PULLED ON THE GOVERNER'S RAFT GOING THE OTHER WAY TO GET HIM INTO FAIR TIDE SO HE DIDNT GET SWEPT BACK INTO THE PASS.

HERE WE ARE JUST STARTING THRU DECPTION PASS WITH OUR LOG TOW. I AM TAILING THE RAFT THRU SO THAT IT DOESEN’T  GET HUNG UP ON GOBLERS KNOB. ONCE I GOT RAY THRU I THEN TURNED AROUND AND PULLED ON THE GOVERNOR’S RAFT GOING THE OTHER WAY TO GET HIM INTO FAIR TIDE SO HE DIDN’T GET SWEPT BACK INTO THE PASS. THEN I WENT BACK TO BOOMING LOGS IN THE SAN JUANS.

 

SHIFTING AN 8 SECTION RAFT THAT WE HAD JUST BUILT IN DEER HARBOR 8-52

SHIFTING AN 8 SECTION RAFT THAT WE HAD JUST BUILT IN DEER HARBOR 8-52

 

JERKMORE AND STUBBY LEAVING DEER HARBOR WITH SMALL SCOW AND BOOM STICKS IN TOW. 8-52

JERKMORE AND STUBBY LEAVING DEER HARBOR WITH SMALL SCOW AND BOOM STICKS IN TOW. 8-52

 

JERKMORE AND BOOM STICK TOW 8-52

JERKMORE AND BOOM STICK TOW 8-52

 

JERMORE & VERDUN LYING AT LOG RAFT THAT WE WERE BUILDING. 8-52

JERKMORE & VERDUN LYING AT LOG RAFT THAT WE WERE BUILDING. 8-52

 

MARK BACK IN SEATTLE VISITING ON BOARD ALZO SCHOOL IS ABOUT TO START AT THE UW.

MARK BACK IN SEATTLE VISITING ON BOARD THE ALZO, GEORGE HILL’S BOAT. SCHOOL IS ABOUT TO START AT THE UW. 9-52/

 

MARK FITTING TIRE ON THE SIDE OF THE JERKMORE. 9-52.

MARK FITTING TIRE ON THE SIDE OF THE JERKMORE. 9-52.

 

HERE I AM TAILING PAT STOPPELMAN AND THE WESTERN STAR AND HIS LOG TOW OUT OF PLEASANT HARBOR WITH THE JERKMORE.

HERE I AM TAILING PAT STOPPELMAN AND THE WESTERN STAR AND HIS LOG TOW OUT OF PLEASANT HARBOR WITH THE JERKMORE. 11-52

 

WE HELPED PAT GET HIS LOG TOW INTO SHELTER UNDER TEAKLEET BLUFF  WHEN IT STARTED BLOWING HARD OUT OF THE SOUTH EAST. FROM LEFT PAT STOPPELMAN AND DICK BALLINGER, 11-52.

WE HELPED PAT GET HIS LOG TOW INTO SHELTER UNDER TEEKALET BLUFF WHEN IT STARTED BLOWING HARD OUT OF THE SOUTH EAST. ON THE LEFT IS PAT STOPPELMAN AND DICK BALLINGER, 11-52.

 

PURCHASE ORDER FROM FOSS FOR SALVAGING 23 LOGS FROM TOW OF EDITH FOSS AT BROWNS POINT IN HOODS CANAL. FAY HOPKINS SKIPPER.  DICK AND I SALVAGED LOGS FOR THE EDITH FOSS AND THEN GOT TO RIDE ALONG AND ENJOY THE FOOD AND THE HOT OIL STOVE. wE ALWAYS GOT GREAT TREATMENT FROM THE TUG CREWS BECAUSE IF WE WERE AROUND IF THEY HAD ANY PROBLEMS WITH THE TOW WE COULD USUALLY SOLVE THEM. 11-52.

PURCHASE ORDER FROM FOSS FOR SALVAGING 23 LOGS FROM TOW OF EDITH FOSS AT BROWNS POINT IN HOODS CANAL. FAY HOPKINS SKIPPER. DICK AND I SALVAGED LOGS FOR THE EDITH FOSS AND THEN GOT TO RIDE ALONG AND ENJOY THE FOOD AND THE HOT OIL STOVE. WE ALWAYS GOT GREAT TREATMENT FROM THE TUG CREWS BECAUSE IF WE WERE AROUND IF THEY HAD ANY PROBLEMS WITH THE TOW WE COULD USUALLY SOLVE THEM. 11-52.

 

VIEW FROM AFT DECK OF EDITH FOSS AND HER LOG TOW.

VIEW FROM AFT DECK OF EDITH FOSS AND HER LOG TOW.

 

EDITH FOSS. 11-52

EDITH FOSS. 11-52

 

ECITH FOSS. 11-52

EDITH FOSS. 11-52

 

JERKMORE TOWING FISH SCOW OUT OF ROCHE HARBOR 12-1952

JERKMORE TOWING FISH SCOW OUT OF ROCHE HARBOR 12-1952

 

TOTAL BOARD FOOT OF LOGS FROM APRIL 5 1950 TO DECEMBER 1952.

TOTAL BOARD FEET OF LOGS FROM APRIL 5, 1950 TO DECEMBER 1952.

 

 PRESENT DAY: BOYER HALVORSEN AND I HAVE BEEN EXCHANGING PHOTOS

 

GRETCHEN H IN THE CHANNEL AT WAKE ISLAND NOW THATS ALONG WAY FROM HOME.

GRETCHEN H IN THE CHANNEL AT WAKE ISLAND. NOW THAT’S ALONG WAY FROM HOME.

 

GRETCHEN H AND BARGE SEABECK IN TONGASS NARROWS IN SEPT. 2014

GRETCHEN H AND BARGE SEABECK IN TONGASS NARROWS IN SEPT. 2014

 

BARGE SEABECK AND HER DECK LOAD.

BARGE SEABECK AND HER DECK LOAD.

 

BILLIE H AND JENIFER H. BILLIE H WAS JUST REENGINED WITH EMDs. JENIFER H CAME FROM PT .BARROW.

BILLIE H AND JENNIFER H. THE BILLIE H WAS JUST RE-ENGINED WITH EMDs. JENNIFER H CAME FROM PT .BARROW.

 

LOCAL PHOTOS BY MARK, MARGIE AND ERIK.

 

CHRISTINA H BUILT FOR PACIFIC TOWBOAT AS THE SEA MULE IN 1957. WE ARE NOT SURE OF THE DETAILS BUT HERE GOES. THE BIBLE SAYS 150 HORSEPOWER BUT WE KNOW THAT SHE HAD A 6-110 GM 220 HORSEPOWER & SHE HAD A 3306 CAT AND THEN RICHARD PUT IN A 8-92 GM WITH A 4.5 TO 1 GEAR. THAT IS SOMEWHERE AROUND 300 HORSEPOWER AND SHE SWINGS A 50 X 48 4 BLADE PROP. I CANT FIND A PHOTO OF HER AS THER SEA MULE HELP!!!!!.

CHRISTINA H WAS BUILT FOR PACIFIC TOWBOAT (FOSS) AS THE SEA MULE IN 1957 AT ANACORTES. WE ARE NOT SURE OF THE DETAILS BUT HERE GOES. THE BIBLE SAYS 150 HORSEPOWER WHEN SHE WAS BUILT, BUT WE KNOW THAT SHE HAD A 6-110 GM 220 HORSEPOWER & SHE HAD A 3306 CAT AND THEN RICHARD PUT IN A 8-92 GM WITH A 4.5 TO 1 GEAR. THAT IS SOMEWHERE AROUND 300 HORSEPOWER AND SHE SWINGS A 49 X 46 THREE-BLADE PROP. I CAN’T FIND A PHOTO OF HER AS THE SEA MULE. HELP!!!!!

 

CHRISTINA H ON THE HARD AT CSR.

CHRISTINA H ON THE HARD AT CSR.

 

CHRISTINA H OUT ON THE HARD AND HER 50 INCH PROP.

CHRISTINA H OUT ON THE HARD AND HER 49 INCH PROP.

 

HERE SHE IS IN A PUSH OFF WITH OUR GRACE. THE GRACE AT 1500 RPMS WILL HOLD HER AND THE GRACE WILL TURN 18OO AT THE DOCK. sO SHE IS GETTING HER 300 HORSEPOWER.

HERE SHE IS IN A PUSH OFF WITH OUR TUG GRACE. THE GRACE AT 1500 RPMS WILL HOLD HER AND THE GRACE WILL TURN 1800 AT THE DOCK. SO SHE IS ALMOST  GETTING HER 300 HORSEPOWER. THE GRACE IS RATED AT 365 HORSEPOWER AND SWINGS A 60 INCH 5-BLADE PROP ON A 6 TO 1 GEAR AND SHE HAS A D-343 CAT.

 

THE CHRISTINA H IS QUICK AND HAS A GOOD TURN OF SPEED.

THE CHRISTINA H IS QUICK AND HAS A GOOD TURN OF SPEED.

 

HERE SHE IS TIED UP TO OUR DOCK GOOD LOOKING HOUSE JUST NEEDS A LITTLE BONDO AND REWIRING.

HERE SHE IS TIED UP TO OUR DOCK. GOOD LOOKING HOUSE JUST NEEDS A LITTLE BONDO AND REWIRING.

 

WOOPS WERE DID THE HOUSE GO. I THINK TOM HAS TO MUCH FUN WELDING UP NEW ALUMINUM HOUSES.

WOOPS! WHERE DID THE HOUSE GO? I THINK TOM HAS TOO MUCH FUN WELDING UP NEW ALUMINUM HOUSES. RICHIE IS DEFINITELY HELPING.

 

ERIK GIVING RICHARD A CHECK FOR THE CHRISTINA H. NEW NAMES I HAVE HEARD FOR IT ARE YANKEE, JEB STUART, CLIDE, GENERAL GRANT, NORTHERN AGREESION,

ERIK GIVING RICHARD A CHECK FOR THE CHRISTINA H. NEW NAMES I HAVE HEARD FOR IT ARE: YANKEE; JEB STUART; CLIDE; GENERAL GRANT; NORTHERN AGGRESSION.

 

HOS ARROWHEAD SECRET BOAT OUT OF LUDD. HE HAD TO BACK DOWN AS A SLOOP SAILED RIGHT IN FRONT OF HIM WHAT THEY PUT ON THE HEAD STONE AFTER A COLLISION IS ( I HAD THE RIGHT AWAY)

HOS ARROWHEAD – SECRET BOAT OUT OF LUDD. HE HAD TO BACK DOWN AS A SLOOP SAILED RIGHT IN FRONT OF HIM. WHAT THEY PUT ON THE HEAD STONE AFTER A COLLISION IS:  “I HAD THE RIGHT OF WAY”.

 

SNOW PRINCE BEAUTIFUL CANADIAN YACHT. WHAT DID SHE LOOK LIKE BEFORE THE CONVERSION?.

SNOW PRINCE - BEAUTIFUL CANADIAN YACHT. WHAT DID SHE LOOK LIKE BEFORE THE CONVERSION?.

 

ON-TIME WITH A FRESH COAT OF VARNISH.

ON-TIME WITH A FRESH COAT OF VARNISH.

 

 

MANSON'S NANCY M WITH SPECIAL PUSH GEAR ON HER BOW. THEY WERE BRINGING IN PONTOONS FOR THE NEW BRIDGE ON SUNDAY AFTERNOON, THE PUSH GEAR DISTRIBUTES THE LOAD BETTER ON THE CONCRETE PONTOON. IT REALLY WORKS AS SHE WAS GOING TWICE AS FAST AS THE FIRST TIME WE SAW HER SEVERAL MONTHS AGO.

MANSON’S NANCY M WITH SPECIAL PUSH GEAR ON HER BOW. THEY WERE BRINGING IN PONTOONS FOR THE NEW BRIDGE ON SUNDAY AFTERNOON. THE PUSH GEAR DISTRIBUTES THE LOAD BETTER ON THE CONCRETE PONTOON. IT REALLY WORKS AS SHE WAS GOING TWICE AS FAST AS THE FIRST TIME WE SAW HER SEVERAL MONTHS AGO.

 

TERILYN BRINGING IN A SMALL PONTOON.

TERILYN BRINGING IN A SMALL PONTOON

 

 

WE ARE MAKING UP TO THE SEA WOLF AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD PRIOR TO PUTTING HER INTO # 2 DRYDOCK. WE HAD EARLYER PICKED HER UP FROM THE IMPALLA OUTSIDE THE LOCKS AFTER WES HANSON HAD TOWED HER DOWN FROM DUTCH HARBOR.

WE ARE MAKING UP TO THE SEA WOLF AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD PRIOR TO PUTTING HER INTO # 2 DRYDOCK. WE HAD EARLIER PICKED HER UP FROM THE IMPALLA OUTSIDE THE LOCKS AFTER WES HANSON HAD TOWED HER DOWN FROM DUTCH HARBOR.

 

SEA WOLF IN DRYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD.

SEA WOLF IN DRYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD.

 

AL & BRYCE BOTH HAD A BIRTHDAY SO WE PUT THEIR NAMES ON THE CAKE, AL GOT BUSY AND COULD NOT MAKE THE PARTY SO WE JUST WENT AHEAD AND ATE THE CAKE.

AL & BRYCE BOTH HAD A BIRTHDAY SO WE PUT THEIR NAMES ON THE CAKE, AL GOT BUSY AND COULD NOT MAKE THE PARTY SO WE JUST WENT AHEAD AND ATE THE CAKE.

 

BIRTHDAY PARTY FROM THE LEFT MARGIE, TOM,RICHIE,BRYCE & ERIK.

BIRTHDAY PARTY FROM THE LEFT MARGIE, TOM, RICHIE, BRYCE & ERIK.

 

ISLAND BREEZE ON HER DAILY RUN TO THE PIT.

ISLAND BREEZE ON HER DAILY RUN TO THE PIT.

 

 

OUR MAN ON WHIDBEY ISLAND, STAN WILLHIGHT, SENDS ON PART OF HIS COLLECTION OF BLACK AND WHITE TUGBOAT PHOTOS. GREAT STUFF STAN!

 

 

ANDREW FOSS 1940 AT FRIDAY HARBOR. LEE LANGSTAFF SENT A NOTE TO STAN AND I QUOTE "I WORKED ON THE ANDREW FOSS MANY TIMES AS MATE UNDER CAPT. BILL ERICKSON FRO 1946 TO 1950. MOST OF THE TIME THE ANDREW FOSS TOWED LOGS OUT OF CANADA AND GAS AND OIL BARGES, BUT DURING THIS TIME WE DID MAKE A COUPLE OF TRIPS TO ALASKA AND TOWED BACK LOG CRIBS FOR THE MILLS IN BELLINGHAM, ANACORTES AND SEATTLE. I MET LEE WHEN HE WAS SKIPPER OF THE POLAR STAR FOR JIM HAGEN AND LATER HE WAS PILOT ON A FEW FOREIGN VESSELS THAT WE SHIFTED. ALWAYS A NICE COMPETENT FELLOW.

ANDREW FOSS 1940 AT FRIDAY HARBOR. LEE LANGSTAFF SENT A NOTE TO STAN, AND I QUOTE “I WORKED ON THE ANDREW FOSS MANY TIMES AS MATE UNDER CAPT. BILL ERICKSON FROM 1946 TO 1950. MOST OF THE TIME THE ANDREW FOSS TOWED LOGS OUT OF CANADA AND GAS AND OIL BARGES, BUT DURING THIS TIME WE DID MAKE A COUPLE OF TRIPS TO ALASKA AND TOWED BACK LOG CRIBS FOR THE MILLS IN BELLINGHAM, ANACORTES AND SEATTLE. I MET LEE WHEN HE WAS SKIPPER OF THE POLAR STAR FOR JIM HAGEN AND LATER HE WAS PILOT ON A FEW FOREIGN VESSELS THAT WE SHIFTED. ALWAYS A NICE COMPETENT FELLOW.”

 

 

SEASPAN PRINCE 7-18-1990 AT NEW WESTMINSTER.

SEASPAN PRINCE 7-18-1990 AT NEW WESTMINSTER.

 

ELEFANTE GRANDE & SEA ROVER 5-10-1990 A COUPLE OF CROWLEY BOATS.

ELEFANTE GRANDE & SEA ROVER 5-10-1990 A COUPLE OF CROWLEY BOATS IN THE LOCKS.

 

JOE-C TOWING DAVE UPDOKES MIKI THE RELIEF JUAT PASSING UNDER THE AURORA BRIDGE.

JOE-C TOWING DAVE UPDIKES MIKI THE RELIEF JUST PASSING UNDER THE AURORA BRIDGE.

 

MOGUL AT FISHERMANS TERMINAL IN SEATTLE 5-2-1990.

MOGUL AT FISHERMEN’S TERMINAL IN SEATTLE 5-2-1990.

 

NORTHERN RETRIEVER 4-11 1990. SHE WAS A V-4 TUG FROM WW II.

NORTHERN RETRIEVER 4-11 1990. SHE WAS A V-4 TUG FROM WW II.

 

PROSPER WAS A UNIT OF BELLINGHAM TUG & BARGE AND HAD A 350 HP ATLAS.  I HAVE A GREAT PHOTO OF HER OUTSIDE THE PASS WITH A LOG TOW.

PROSPER WAS A UNIT OF BELLINGHAM TUG & BARGE AND HAD A 350 HP ATLAS. I HAVE A GREAT PHOTO OF HER OUTSIDE THE PASS WITH A LOG TOW.

 

WESTERN PIONEER AT LUDD 5-10-1990. SHE WAS AN ALASKA FREIGHTER FOR YEARS.

WESTERN PIONEER AT LUDD 5-10-1990. SHE WAS AN ALASKA FREIGHTER FOR YEARS.

 

MORE PICTURES OF OLYMPIA TUGBOAT RACING TAKEN BY SCOTT SCHOCH FROM ROBIN PATERSON’S SCRAPBOOK.

 

GARY DUFF'S MERILYN GETTING ALL THAT YOU CAN GETR OUT OF A 400 HORSEPOWER ENTERPRISE. BUILT AS THE SOUND THEN IVER FOSS.

GARY DUFF’S MERILYN GETTING ALL THAT YOU CAN GET OUT OF A 400 HORSEPOWER ENTERPRISE. BUILT AS THE ANGELES THEN NAMED THE IVER FOSS.     #40

 

STEVES TATE'S ELF SHE ALSO WAS A FOSS BOAT THE FOSS NO. 15 ORIGINALY SHE WAS A STEAM TUG THE ELF.

STEVES TATE’S ELF. SHE ALSO WAS A FOSS BOAT - THE FOSS NO. 15 ORIGINALY SHE WAS A STEAM TUG THE ELF.      #41

 

ANOTHER SHOT OF THE ELF.    #42

ANOTHER SHOT OF THE ELF. #42

 

DOUG PATERSON'S CHEMAINUS YARDER AT OLYMPIA.

DOUG PATERSON’S CHEMAINUS YARDER AT OLYMPIA.  #44

 

LEE & GLADYS SHOBEN'S LILLIAN C. AT OLYMPIA

LEE & GLADYS SHOBEN’S LILLIAN C. AT OLYMPIA   #45

 

ROB & KAE PATERSON'S WINAMAC & GREG MAGNUSON'S MALOLO LEADING THE PACK.  #48

ROB & KAE PATERSON’S WINAMAC & GREG MAGNUSON’S MALOLO LEADING THE PACK. #48

 

WINAMAC, RELIANCE AND ELWAH HAVING A GOOD TIME.  #51

WINAMAC, RELIANCE AND ELWAH HAVING A GOOD TIME. #51

 

MORE LOCAL PHOTOS TAKEN BY CAPT. ERIK FREEMAN.

 

BERING ROSE IN DRYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD

BERING ROSE IN DRYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD

 

SEA WOLF AT ALASKA BOAT FOR REPAIR.

SEA WOLF AT ALASKA BOAT FOR REPAIR.

 

WESTWARD ENROUTE TO FOSS DRYDOCK WITH DIXIE PROVIDING THE POWER.

WESTWARD I ENROUTE TO FOSS DRYDOCK WITH DIXIE PROVIDING THE POWER.

 

CAPT MARK DING WHAT HE DOES BEST PUSHING THE THROTTLE.

CAPT. MARK DOING WHAT HE DOES BEST, PUSHING THE THROTTLE.

 

CAPT. TOM MAKING UP TO CORP. BARGE.

CAPT. TOM MAKING UP TO CORPS OF ENGINEERS BARGE.

 

DIXIE PUTTING WESTWARD I INTO FOSS DRYDOCK.

DIXIE PUTTING WESTWARD I INTO FOSS DRYDOCK.

 

ARICA IN FOSS DRYDOCK.

ARICA IN FOSS DRYDOCK.

 

JEEP AND GENERAL LEE SHIFTING ANITA J AT PACIFIC FISHERMEN.

JEEP AND GENERAL LEE SHIFTING ANITA J AT PACIFIC FISHERMEN.

 

BOYER'S MAIH H ISN'T SHE A BEAUTY.

BOYER’S MAIA H - ISN’T SHE A BEAUTY!

 

CONFIDENCE AT PACIFIC FISHERMEN.

CONFIDENCE AT PACIFIC FISHERMEN.

 

WESTWARD I JUST LEAVING STABERTT'S WITH  DIXIE ALONGSIDE.

WESTWARD I JUST LEAVING STABBERT’S WITH DIXIE ALONGSIDE.

 

PACIFIC STAR IN DRYDOCK AT STABBERT'S YACHT & SHIP.

PACIFIC STAR IN DRYDOCK AT STABBERT’S YACHT & SHIP.

 

MT. MITCHELL BACK AT HER MOORINGS.

MT. MITCHELL BACK AT HER MOORINGS.

 

OCEAN ALASKA AT HER BASE AT EAST LAKE UNION OF U.S. SEAFOODS.

OCEAN ALASKA AT HER BASE AT U.S. SEAFOODS ON EAST LAKE UNION.

 

CAPT.TOM MAKING UP DIXIE TO ALLIANCE AT U.S. SEAFOODS.

CAPT.TOM MAKING UP DIXIE TO ALLIANCE AT U.S. SEAFOODS.

 

DIXIE SHIFTING ALLIANCE AT U.S. SEAFOODS.

DIXIE SHIFTING ALLIANCE AT U.S. SEAFOODS.

 

DIXIE SHIFTING OCEAN ALLIANCE AT U.S. SEAFOODS.

DIXIE SHIFTING OCEAN ALLIANCE AT U.S. SEAFOODS.

 

CAPT. TOM GETTING READY FOR THE NEXT SHIFT.

CAPT. TOM GETTING READY FOR THE NEXT SHIFT.

 

ALLIANCE & OCEAN ALASKA AT U.S.SEAFOODS PIERS.

ALLIANCE & OCEAN ALASKA AT U.S. SEAFOODS’ PIERS.

 

DIXIE & GENERAL GRANT SHIFTING DOUG BOWERS RUSSIAN PROJECT FROM ALASKA BOAT TO COASTAL TRANSPORTATION.

DIXIE & GENERAL GRANT SHIFTING DOUG BOWERS RUSSIAN PROJECT FROM ALASKA BOAT TO COASTAL TRANSPORTATION.

 

RICHIE HAVING A CUP OF JOE ENROUTE TO BALLARD.

RICHIE HAVING A CUP OF JOE ENROUTE TO BALLARD.

 

DIXIE PUTTNG RUSSIAN BACK INTO HER SPOT AT ALASKA BOAT.

DIXIE PUTTNG RUSSIAN BACK INTO HER SPOT AT ALASKA BOAT.

 

I HAVE BUILT SCRAP BOOKS FOR A LONG TIME. THEY ARE 19 INCHES BY 24 INCHES. THEY START ABOUT 1850 AND LAST YEAR I FINISHED UP 1996. THERE ARE SO MANY PICTURES AND DATA THAT I HAD TO SPLIT  A YEAR UP INTO FOUR DIFFERENT BOOKS SO THAT MARGIE COULD LIFT ONE. NOW I AM INTO MARCH OF 1997 AND I FOUND SOME GREAT SHOTS TAKEN WHILE WE WERE WORKING AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK WHICH I WILL SHARE WITH YOU. NO, I DO NOT HAVE ANY SPARE TIME.

 

JAMES A THE LUDD TUG. SHE CAME FROM THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND I HAVE A PHOTO OF HER HANDLING A BARGE FERRY AND SHE HAD A LITTLE HIGHER HOUSE. HE HAS A 6-71 GM.

JAMES A THE LUDD TUG. SHE CAME FROM THE COLUMBIA RIVER AND I HAVE A PHOTO OF HER HANDLING A BARGE FERRY AND SHE HAD A LITTLE HIGHER HOUSE. SHE HAS A 6-71 GM.

 

HERE SHE IS BACKING OUT THE JOHN N COBB.

HERE SHE IS BACKING OUT THE JOHN N COBB.

 

OUR SOVEREIGN PUSHING VIRGINIA V INTO A DRY DOCK AT LUDD SOVEREIGN HAD FOUR 6-71 GM DIESELS ON TWO SHAFTS AND SWUNG 58 INCH PROPS ON ABOUT 7 TO 1 REDUCTION GEARS. SHE CAME UP FROM CALIFORNIA TO HANDLE THE LST GARBAGE BARGE BETWEEN EVERETT AND SEATTLE. SHE HAD BEEN NAMED PLUMAS FOR THE PLUMAS RIVER.

OUR SOVEREIGN PUSHING VIRGINIA V INTO A DRY DOCK AT LUDD. THE SOVEREIGN HAD FOUR 6-71 GM DIESELS ON TWO SHAFTS AND SWUNG 58 INCH PROPS ON ABOUT 7 TO 1 REDUCTION GEARS. SHE CAME UP FROM CALIFORNIA TO HANDLE THE 1st GARBAGE BARGE BETWEEN EVERETT AND SEATTLE. SHE HAD BEEN NAMED PLUMAS FOR THE PLUMAS RIVER.

 

HERE OUR SOVEREIGN IS DOCKING THE ATKA A RUSSIAN VESSEL AT LUDD.

HERE OUR SOVEREIGN IS DOCKING THE ATKA, A RUSSIAN VESSEL AT LUDD.

 

HERE OUR SOVEREIGN IS SHIFTING THE ABBY M AN EX CROWLEY TUG THE THEILINE W WHICH CAME FROM AMERICAN TUGBOAT CO. IN EVERETT WHEN TOM BOOUGHT THEM. AMERICAN GOT HER ON THE EAST COAST AS THE ATLANTIC NO. 6 AND SHE WAS DIESEL ELECTRIC. I USED TO TAIL HER IN WITH THE STANDFAST HAD SHE COUOLD SLOW DOWN TO JUST A CRAWL WITH THE DIESEL ELECTRIC SYSTEM.

HERE OUR SOVEREIGN IS SHIFTING THE ABBY M AT LUDD AN EX-CROWLEY TUG THE THEILINE W WHICH CAME FROM AMERICAN TUGBOAT CO. IN EVERETT WHEN TOM BOUGHT THEM. AMERICAN GOT HER ON THE EAST COAST AS THE ATLANTIC NO. 6 AND SHE WAS DIESEL ELECTRIC. I USED TO TAIL HER AND HER NORTHLAND BARGE IN WITH THE STANDFAST.  SHE COULD SLOW DOWN TO JUST A CRAWL WITH THE DIESEL ELECTRIC SYSTEM.

 

HERE WE ARE PUSHING ON THE SIDE OF DOUG LOGANS ALASKA GRANDE ISLE EX DACKAR I AM TAKING THE PICTURE FROM THE BLUBERRY. A REAL WIND STORM CAME UP AND THE SHIP WAS TRYING TO LIFT THE TOP OF THE SOUTH PIER OFF AT LUDD. WE GROUND AWAY ON IT TILL THE WIND WENT DOWN SO THAT NOTHING MOVED.

HERE WE ARE PUSHING ON THE SIDE OF DOUG LOGAN’S ALASKA GRANDE ISLE (EX-DAKAR I). AM TAKING THE PICTURE FROM THE BLUBERRY. A REAL WIND STORM CAME UP AND THE SHIP WAS TRYING TO LIFT THE TOP OF THE SOUTH PIER OFF AT LUDD. WE GROUND AWAY ON IT TILL THE WIND WENT DOWN SO THAT NOTHING MOVED.

 

MORE PHOTOS FROM 1997.  BALLARD CAMERA (OWNED BY BRUCE & KATHLEEN COZENS) DEVELOPED & PRINTED ALL OF MY PHOTOS AND DID A GREAT JOB.

 

WESTERN NAVIGATOR ON THE HEAD END BRINGING IN THE ARCTIC FJORD. 4-1997

WESTERN NAVIGATOR ON THE HEAD END BRINGING IN THE ARCTIC FJORD. 4-1997

 

SEA & SHORE'S  PETER H & ASD TUG 4-1997

SEA & SHORE’S PETER H & ASD TUG 4-1997

 

PETER H AND SEA & SHORE FLOATING EQUIMENT 4-1997.

PETER H AND SEA & SHORE FLOATING EQUIPMENT 4-1997.

 

 

Thanks to all of you who send in pictures and facts so that I can share the information one photo at a time.  Anything that you send me, I can scan and send back to you good as new.

WANTED:

  1. Crowley decals and cloth patches for jackets of caps. The one I really like says “Red Stack Tugs”.

  2. Old Cary-Davis & Puget Sound Tug & Barge Photos & advertisements.

  3. Old cannery tender & log towing photos.

  4. We buy old tug and waterfront photos or collections and snapshots, as well as old (pre 1946) Marine Digest Magazines in any condition.

  5. Information wanted: in an article in the Yachting magazine, it stated that Doc Freeman bought a tug named LEWIS II in 1943. He got her from Bellingham Tug & Barge and Nick Olson sent me the file from the Coast Guard on her and now I need a photo. Doc Freeman owned her in 1943. Other owners were Alan J. Bannon 1944, Ragnvald Johnson 1945, Albert R. Peterson of Port Townsend 1968-1971, Joe Douglass Pennock of Seattle 1974 and Harry R. McGahan of Aberdeen 1976 anyone knowing any of these folks may lead me to a photo. Thanks Nick.

  6. Want builders plate off the Coast Guard Cutter BONHAM. I gave it to Jim Valentyne after dad bought the BONHAM.

  7. Need photo of SEA MULE (EX-CHRISTINA H) she was built in 1957 for Pacific Towboat (Foss)

  8. All the best from:     Mark & Margie Freeman, Captains Erik & Tom, Miss Blue, Richie,  The Mark Freeman Maritime Museum, Tatoosh Towing & Salvage, Fremont Boat Co., Fremont Tugboat Co. and the three cats; Indy, Razz and Batman (all three cats came from a no-kill shelter about 4 years ago.)

Please donate to the Northwest Seaport to help repair the ARTHUR FOSS. You saw the pictures of the CHICKAMAUGA being dismantled in Port Townsend we sure don’t want that to happen the ARTHUR FOSS.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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MARK FREEMAN’S “RUDDERLESS” FOR SEPTEMBER 15, 2014

CAPTAIN MARK.

 CAPT. MARK

 

 

OUR LOGO THANKS TO JOHNNY ADAMS WHO DREW IT AND BILL GARDEN GAVE ME PERMISSION TO USE IT AS HE DID FOR MANY YEARS.

OUR LOGO THANKS TO JOHNNY ADAMS WHO DREW IT AND BILL GARDEN GAVE ME PERMISSION TO USE IT AS HE DID FOR MANY YEARS.

WE LOST A COUPLE MORE FELLOWS SEEMS LIKE THAT’S ALL I PRINT NOW. PAT HASKETT, WELL KNOWN NORTHWEST ARTIST, DIED. PAT WAS ONE OF THE THREE FOUNDERS OF THE OLYMPIA-SOUTH SOUND MARITIME CHAPTER AND HARBOR DAYS. HE DIED DURING THE 41ST ANNUAL HARBOR DAYS AND THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE  OF THE FIRST TUG RACES THAT HE HELPED ESTABLISH. AS WELL AS BEING A WELL KNOWN NORTH WEST ARTIST, HE ALSO WAS IN THE TUG BOAT BUSINESS WITH THE TUGS SALLY S AND THE MYSTERY. I HAVE SEVERAL HASKETT ORIGINALS IN MY OFFICE AND HOME BUT MY FAVORITE ONE IS OF THE SEASPAN SOVEREIGN AND HER BARGE IN HEAVY WEATHER. PAT WAS ALSO AN ARMY VETERAN HAVING SERVED IN VIETNAM.

MIKE BUSE OWNER OF THE TUG MAGGIE B HAD A STROKE IN GIG HARBOR ON THE WAY TO THE HARBOR DAYS TUGBOAT RACE IN OLYMPIA AND LATER DIED IN THE HOSPITAL. MIKE WAS A LONG TIME PARTICIPANT IN THE HARBOR DAYS TUGBOAT RACES. HE WAS VERY PROUD OF HIS TUGS WORKING HISTORY WITH THE FAMILY OWNED BUSE LUMBER CO. IN EVERETT.

BOB PECK’S NEW TUG THE KATHY M ON DISPLAY AT THE OLYMPIA TUG RACE.

BOB PECK BUILT HER AND SHE HAS A 38 HP DIESEL ENGINE AND IS 15 FEET LONG.

BOB PECK BUILT HER AND SHE HAS A 38 HP DIESEL ENGINE AND IS 15 FEET LONG. CHUCK FOWLER PHOTO.

 

KATHY M AT SPEED SHE IS DESIGNED AROUND A 1900 STEAM TUG. CHUCK FOWLER PHOTO.

KATHY M AT SPEED SHE IS DESIGNED AROUND A 1900 STEAM TUG. CHUCK FOWLER PHOTO.

 

 

JERKMORE: Navy Serial #C-31568; Sales catalog B-48-50 opening June 21, 1950 Lot 13. Navy ship APA 38-13 LCVP 36 FOOT LANDING BARGE. Coast Guard # 30 N 1799.

We could all see that I couldn’t go too far or get a very big log off the beach or pull very much with the SEAL ROCK but it got me started at age 14 into beachcombing and independent towing; I knew where my compass was pointing. My payments must have been current because dad was talking to me about a bigger tug. Of course being a kid (I haven’t changed much) I wanted a real neat good looking tug like the Vamoose but dad knew what I needed was a shallow draft (the VAMOOSE drew 6 feet) boat that could run right up on the beach with lots of power to jerk a log off the beach and lots of power to tow your own raft. Dad had built the SANDDAB II out of a 36 foot LCVP landing barge for his Miller’s Bay boat. She had a 175 horsepower Continental Commando gas engine and she would go right up on the beach and he tried backing a log off the beach (successfully!) so he knew, dammit he was always right (lucky me). So I kept looking at little tugs trying him on for size but that didn’t work. We had gone over to the Bremerton Navy Yard looking at surplus boats and he was high bidder on several LCMs and LCVPs. So Jack and I towed them home – little did I know that among all those boats was my new tug. Dad said “why don’t I take the SEAL ROCK and tow this one LCVP, item 13, over to dock 6 by our big covered shed and you can go to work on it because it is your new tug.” Wow! I had a new tug… but it was not esthetically pleasing. It did not have a real bow, in fact it was a flat bow just like a barge; the only thing round was the stern. Oh my goodness, my new tug was a landing barge!!!!!!  Needless to say I was more than a little disgruntled but there was nothing that I could do about it. Dad had his friend, Bill Garden, draw up a set of plans for the conversion. I still didn’t get it that this was going to be an all in one: a super jerk boat, a small tug, a one man operation and a money maker but it still didn’t have a bow. Of course I was always busy towing for dad, beachcombing logs with the SEAL ROCK, going to high school and working in the store and working on my new boat. I towed her next door to Ed Lee’s dry-dock and we hauled her out of water and pulled her up on the hard where we could take her apart. Jack McCrary was in charge and I worked on her and Paul Yitterdahl and Ed Lee and several other of dad’s employees also worked on her. We were going to get her out in a hurry and start working her. The first thing we had to do was take off the ¼ inch armor plating, recut it so that it was at the bottom of the chine and reached up to the edge of the deck to protect her from logs hitting her – just like iron bark on real tugs. Dad had a special piece of steel built that went around the stern and across the bow. It was not possible to hurt the hull with the armor plating on it, but the ¾” plywood would collapse if a log hit it without the steel. Of course the armor plate was almost impossible to cut with a cutting torch or to drill new bolt holes, there is too much nickel in the steel I was told. We built a rube Goldberg contraption to hold the ½ inch drill and we had a 4 x 6 timber about 10 feet long for the lever arm, when we pressed down on the end of the timber we really got pressure on the drill bit. We used gallons of oil on the drill bit and everybody learned how to sharpen drill bits. It was quite an operation because we had to have a hole every 6 inches all the way around the steel plate and there were 6 plates on each side and one across the bow and stern. It seems like we drilled for weeks. We cut the sides down as you can see in the photos because there was no way you could work off the height of a landing barge; we got her so low amidships that I could sit in the low spot and dog a log – really handy. We had a steel bitt welded up for the bow bitt that would attach to the lifting ring plates in the bottom and we strengthened the forward deck with lots of dead wood and two full length 2×12” oak planks. We figured out that she would back everything off the beach and the bitt had to be strong enough to lift the boat up by it and the boat weighed several tons. But when backing up at 6 knots that log was going to roll down the beach in a hurry when that tow line came tight. And she had enough power to back the log off the beach dragging it across the sand. Of course I didn’t tell you but she had a fresh 6-71 GM (jimmy diesel) of 225 horsepower with 90 MM injectors and a one and one half to one reduction gear and a twin disc clutch. She swung a standard LCVP prop [22 inch diameter and 20 inches of pitch] with real heavy blades. Jack built these real heavy duty corner posts out of 6×6” timbers. Bill Garden always loved to kid my dad about the corner posts that he built into all his conversions. Dad really liked big heavy corner posts. They are hard to build with rabbets for the house sides and where it attaches to the deck has to be perfect and very strong so that when a line under strain hits it at can stand the strain. The house where I would live, on and off for over 5 years, was not much but it kept you dry if not terribly warm. On the port side there was a settee bunk and the back stop for that was a 6 foot pipe berth which would swing up so that if you had a deckhand there were 2 berths. On the starboard side was a sink built into the top of a kitchen cabinet and behind that was a Skippy wood stove and underneath the stove was storage for wood or presto logs. The steering wheel was in the center front of the pilot house and just to the right of it was the landing barge control which was a big lever with a speed control in the handle, all manual of course, standard navy issue. On top of the house I carried a short skiff and on the aft cabin over the engine I had a 15 gallon wood barrel for drinking water, in the engine room there was a bucket for the call of nature.  All primitive but worked just fine – standard work boat stuff, no frills. We put a small compass on her and an inside search light with a cord. Eventually G & L Radio found me a small 5 watt radio telephone with a very limited range. If I was on the east shore of Hoods Canal I could not talk to the Seattle Marine Operator at Edmonds but if went over to the west side there were no trees in the way so I could get thru. She had a wet exhaust to start with but that was hard to work around so I had Red over at Seth Green’s weld me up a dry exhaust using part of an old stack off a cannery tender. In the engine room there was a sharp bend in the exhaust pipe and he welded up a box around the 4 inch pipe and we cooled it with the sea water that circulated and cooled the heat exchanger so that you could get past the back end of the engine without burning yourself. We also installed a clutch control next to the stern tow bitt that was really handy for moving the boat just a little bit; that way you didn’t have to run up to the pilot house if you just wanted to nudge her. There was about an 18 inch step down to get in and out of the pilot house. The designer, Higgins, had a monkey rudder built in to the bottom of the LCVPs just ahead of the prop to make them handle better. Dad named her the JERKMORE because he built a super jerk boat and he was just a little corny. I, of course, didn’t think very much of the name but it stuck and the boat proved to be a formidable beach comber.  We commissioned her in December, 1950 and I started beachcombing with her on Christmas vacation. My dad “Doc” then gave me the bill for the JERKMORE. It was for $ 2,500.00 plus sales tax, plus interest. I can’t find the bill or when I paid it off, you can sure see how valuable the dollar used to be. I also can’t find all the log books for the JERKMORE. I have two which cover the period from June 10, 1953 to March 3, 1955 when I sold the tug and went on active duty in the Coast Guard and I got demoted from Captain to seamen recruit.

The first trip to the beach to get a log was almost a disaster. I was working around Indianola and it is all full of sunken rocks. I went into the beach, climbed over the bow with the chain and jerk line and hooked up to the log, pulled myself back on board, backed out and about the same time the line came tight I backed into a rock. I hit pretty hard popping the deck flange off with the top of the rudder so the rudder had to come up a couple of inches. I went down in the stern between the two fuel tanks and could not see any water flowing in; the rudder stuffing box was tight and I had not sunk the boat on the first log. I did think was this an omen, like it’s time to move ashore, like the old gag of putting the anchor over your shoulder and start walking east and when someone asks ‘what’s that’, you are home… away from the water…

While I was working the area the next day this big, all white tug the ON-TIME comes up and this fellow motions me over. He says “I am Boyer Halvorsen and my tug the SUSAN H just lost a lot of logs up at Pilot Point. Do you want to work with me to pick them up tomorrow if the wind goes down?” Wow! My first log spill. Build a boat and the work comes; don’t build a boat and nothing ever happens. I of course said ‘You bet, I am ready to go. Where do I meet you and what time do you want to get underway?’ We met the next day over by his buoy in Port Madison. He had about ten boom sticks in tow and we hooked up the JERKMORE behind the ON- TIME and I started a long time friendship with Boyer. Of course he and my dad were friends – dad knew everyone. Now Pilot Point is just south of Point No Point about two miles. Boyer said “When we get there, I will make a bag with these boom sticks and keep one boom stick alongside the tug hung out on an angle so you can drop the log in front of me and I will scoop it up in the v and let it go back into the bag. I will put a man ashore to hook you up and we will start getting our logs back.” The only real problem was that we had to have enough water to work inside this line of rocks so it was a high tide show. It took us a couple of days but we got back 67 logs. It seems that Denny, skipper of the SUSAN H, had come around No Point with the current so he could not go back and the Southeast wind had picked up against the current and he lost logs till he could get back close to shore and get protection down at Sandy Beach which is a long ways; they were Seaboard Lumber Co. logs. Another time I ran up to Twin Spits and picked up 15 logs for Boyer and took them into Port Gamble to the big mill that Pope & Talbot had there. I worked for Boyer all over even towing rafts in Hoods Canal when he was assembling log tows and his good word for me to the mills produced a lot of work cleaning up log spills even in their storages. Most of the work I did myself but I hired Dick Ballinger to work with me just beachcombing. I met his dad who worked at Fremont Boat Co. and later worked at our marine store.

I got my first business license on March 27, 1951 and a story about the JERKMORE and me going to work her was in the Marine Digest of January 20, 1951.

I worked all spring salvaging logs and doing tow jobs and working all the kinks out of the new boat and then it was tugboat race time. What fun! I was the youngest skipper in the race at 17. Reporter Byron Fish printed some wonderful tall tales in the papers, he said that I could be identified not only by my square bow and bright red pilot house and by my rear guard action but then I saw some of the entries and was sure that I could be the slowest. When the race ended I placed 6 out of 8 beating the HOOHAH and the SKOOKUM. Other boats racing were: ISKUM first place; 2nd BEE; 3rd MAGNOLIA; 4th HAZEL FOSS; 5th VESTA MILLER. I waited all my life to be in one of those races what a great time. Only problem I ever had was the JERKMORE would get her square bow under a big wave and would try to go to the bottom so I spent half my time backing up to get her bow up.

Dick and I got a lot of real nice logs in the Clinton area at one point. Someone had come down thru there and leaked logs all the way, our scale sheet showed 60 logs from the Clinton area. But I almost had heart failure just north of Clinton, I was running the boat and we were getting logs off the beach and I was running pretty fast to the next log. Dick was sitting on the port side and he fell over backwards yelling something. I stopped the boat and he pointed in the water here just below the surface was one huge rock and I had almost hit it at 7 knots. Yes, it was on the chart and still is but I got busy and did not check close enough. I corrected that bad habit. Usually you survey an area that you want to work at low tide and you mark all the stones on the chart.

I got another lesson from my dad about what you think you can do and what you can really do. I even got hollered at. I had been up most of the night doing some tow job and my dad comes in my room and wakes me and says “Get up and get going Pioneer Towing needs help. They have the INVADER in the ship canal with an 8-section piece and he needs to be relieved for another job that they have her promised out on. So get your tug and tow that 8 section piece up to the Gas Plant storage and tie it up.” But dad the JERKMORE won’t tow that. Mind you, an 8-section piece would fill up the large Locks. He says “Get up and get going.” I lay in bed for another 5 minutes and he comes roaring into my room and I spring out of bed, dress quickly, run down the dock, grab the JERKMORE and relieve the INVADER. He was right… again… It was a little slow, but I got the job done and Pioneer Towing was happy. But I am not too sure that dad was happy with my performance. I was wrong again but learning. So the next year when Sherman says “Run over to Henry Island and dig out that 33-section tow for the PALOMAR.” I just went and did it. Before we went tuna fishing I helped lock thru 22 sections that Ray Stickler on the KLATAWA and Pat Stoppelman on the WESTERN STAR had towed down from Deep Bay on Lummi Island.

In July we all went tuna fishing out of Westport in Grays Harbor but not on the JERKMORE. Dad had bought this 46 foot halibut schooner the SHARON and we had been working on her getting ready for the ocean. It was one of those summers where the water warms up and the tuna are farther north and dad wanted to try our luck with a fishing venture. Jack McCrary was skipper and I was engineer, navigator, deckhand and Dick was deckhand. She had a 45 horsepower Lorimer heavy-duty diesel, air start with a clutch. We left Seattle and Dad rode along to Port Angeles where he got off. I should have gotten off too. Off Dungeness Spit I found out what an afternoon westerly and an ebb tide do. Boy, was it rough. Dick got off after the first trip and Jack and I made several more just to prove to ourselves that we could not catch enough tuna fish. We caught a lot of fish but never enough and I learned all about bar harbors and more about the ocean. At night we would just shut down and drift with the fleet watching the big freighters work their way thru the fleet, boats were regularly sunk. The boat was built for short fellows and my bunk was not long enough to stretch out in. I did a bad thing in port one morning. I wanted to sleep in and Jack had just cooked this wonderful breakfast and he said more than once “Mark get up and eat.” I finally made the grade and knocked the board out that held the galley table up and everything went on the floor, Jack scrambles out the hatch and says “Well I am not going to clean it up.” I stand there, wide awake now, and I know there are no overboard drains and I will have to clean this up the hard way. Two hours later I have the mess cleaned up and the floor scrubbed and I have made up my mind that I will always get up when summoned or before. I take all the garbage off the boat with me and stop in the first restaurant to get some breakfast. This fellow looks at me very suspiciously and asks “Are you the one that dumped the table?” I admit to it but I ask him “How the hell did you know?” He tells me that this fellow comes in the door, sits down and is laughing to himself and when asked why, Jack tells him the story. So when I walk in the door the fellow is smart enough to think that maybe I was the culprit.  Anyway, we got so far off the coast that I was laying courses out on the red and white squares of the plastic table cloth which I fastened down the chart to with thumb tacks when we ran out of chart. I would take direction finder bearings to find out kind of where we were – north or south of Grays Harbor. We had a 600 foot sounder so once we picked up the bottom we could always find our way home with the direction finder. I remember before we left I was sitting on one of the wheel stops thinking that I would never have to come back to Westport, thank god for that. Well, never say never. Four short years later I reported for duty at the Coast Guard Lifeboat Station at Westport for a tour of duty that lasted another three and a half years.

Boy was I happy to get home and back to towing and beachcombing and log spill work and the boat did not rock all the time. I just don’t like the ocean and I am not a fisherman.

There was a spill in Lake Washington and along with that, I had collected 627 logs with the JERKMORE, SEAL ROCK and MIZPAH as of November 13, 1951. Total footage was 158,660; the average log was 253 board feet.

At the end of summer Lincoln High School started up again but by this time I was a senior. It was just as boring as the last year. I have to tell you a good one, now I can draw or sketch pretty decent pictures of tugboats. I had this class in zoology and Mr. Thompson had us drawing all these bugs and he sends home a note with me to my folks and wants to know if I ever had polio because my drawings were so awful. My folks had a meeting with me and said shape up and draw right; just because they are not tugs doesn’t mean that you can slough off. Hey, if I am not interested that means I am bored and you have lost me as a student and I want to report that at age 80 nothing has changed.

 

 

BID SHEET THAT JERKMORE WAS ON.

BID SHEET THAT JERKMORE WAS ON.

 

JERKMORE WAS ITEM 13.

JERKMORE WAS ITEM 13.

 

36 FOOT LCVP LANDING BARGE.

36 FOOT LCVP LANDING BARGE.

 

1950 PAUL YITTERDAHL CUTTING HEW SHEAR LINE  ON SIDE OF JERKMORE.
1950 PAUL YITTERDAHL CUTTING NEW SHEAR LINE ON SIDE OF JERKMORE.

 

STERN SHOT OF JERKMORE AND YOU CAN SEE THE LINE THRU THE NUMBER THAT WE ARE LOWERING THE SHEAR LINE TO.

STERN SHOT OF JERKMORE.  YOU CAN SEE THE LINE THRU THE NUMBER THAT WE ARE LOWERING THE SHEAR LINE TO.

 

THIS SHOT SHOWS THE BOW CUT DOWN TO ITS NEW HEIGHT AND ALL THE EXTRA DECK BEAMS TO SUPPORT THE NEW DECK AND JERK BITT.

THIS SHOT SHOWS THE BOW CUT DOWN TO ITS NEW HEIGHT AND ALL THE EXTRA DECK BEAMS TO SUPPORT THE NEW DECK AND JERK BITT

 

 

 

 

"JERKMORE" SURVEY

“JERKMORE” SURVEY

 

NEWS FLASH FROM MARINE DIGEST

NEWS FLASH FROM MARINE DIGEST

 

MARK & DICK BALLINGER AND THE NEWLY LAUNCHED JERKMORE.

MARK WITH DICK BALLINGER AND THE NEWLY LAUNCHED JERKMORE.

 

BOYERS "ON-TIME" SHE WAS ONE OF THREE THAT McNEIL"S ISLAND PRISON BUILT DURING WW II. BOYER INSTALLED A 6-110 GM. RAY KRANTZ PHOTO

BOYER’S “ON-TIME”.  SHE WAS ONE OF THREE THAT McNEIL’S ISLAND PRISON BUILT DURING WW II. BOYER INSTALLED A 6-110 GM. RAY KRANTZ PHOTO

 

BOYER'S "SUSAN H" ALONGSIDE RAFT AT CAPE POLE IN ALASKA. DENNIS HAVEN PHOTO.

BOYER’S “SUSAN H” ALONGSIDE RAFT AT CAPE POLE IN ALASKA. DENNIS HAVEN PHOTO.

 

"JERKMORE" LYING AT BOYER'S DOCK IN PORT MADISON WITH "ON-TIME" & "SUSAN H".

“JERKMORE” LYING AT BOYER’S DOCK IN PORT MADISON WITH “ON-TIME” & “SUSAN H”.

 

 

BILL TO SEABOARD LUMBER FOR PILOT POINT LOG SPILL.

BILL TO SEABOARD LUMBER FOR PILOT POINT LOG SPILL.

 

MARCH 1,1951 LETTER TO THE ARMY ENGINEERS REQUESTING REPORTING FORMS FOR TRANSPORTAION.

MARCH 1, 1951 LETTER TO THE ARMY ENGINEERS REQUESTING REPORTING FORMS FOR TRANSPORTATION.

 

FIRST BUSINESS LICENSE AND TAX COMMISSION REGESTRATION.

FIRST BUSINESS LICENSE AND TAX COMMISSION REGISTRATION.

 

 

FEB 1951 JERKMORE OFF WESTPOINT.

FEB 1951 JERKMORE OFF WESTPOINT.

 

MAY 1951 MERRY, MARK & MAY ON STERN OF JERKMORE, WHO COILED THE JERK LINE.

MAY 1951 MERRY, MARK & MAY ON STERN OF JERKMORE. WHO COILED THE JERK LINE?

 

"JERKMORE" AND BEACHCOMB RAFT LYING AT BOYER'S BUOY MAY 1951

“JERKMORE” AND BEACHCOMB RAFT LYING AT BOYER’S BUOY MAY 1951

 

MAY 1951 GETTING A LOG OFF THE BEACH WHERE SHILSHOLE BAY MARINA IS NOW.

MAY 1951 GETTING A LOG OFF THE BEACH WHERE SHILSHOLE BAY MARINA IS NOW.

 

 

ARTICLE ON TUGBOAT RACING BY BYRON FISH.

ARTICLE ON TUGBOAT RACING BY BYRON FISH.

 

 

CLASS C TUGBOAT RACE MAY 19 1951. PHOTO BY JOE WILLIAMSON

CLASS C TUGBOAT RACE MAY 19 1951. PHOTO BY JOE WILLIAMSON

 

 

"JERKMORE" NO. 8 PHOTO BY JOE WILLIAMSON.

“JERKMORE” NO. 8 PHOTO BY JOE WILLIAMSON.

 

 

TUGBOAT RACE ARTICLE OUT OF MARINE DIGEST.

TUGBOAT RACE ARTICLE OUT OF MARINE DIGEST.

 

DOC, MAY & MARK ALL SITTING ON THE MILLERS BAY SAND SPIT BEFORE THEY BUILT HOUSES ON IT AND RUINED IT.

DOC, MAY & MARK ALL SITTING ON THE MILLERS BAY SAND SPIT BEFORE THEY BUILT HOUSES ON IT AND RUINED IT. JUNE 1951

 

TOWING INVOICE TO STIMPSON MILL JUNE 18. 1951

TOWING INVOICE TO STIMPSON MILL JUNE 18,1951

 

 

CLINTON RAFT JUNE 1951.

CLINTON RAFT JUNE 1951.

 

CLINTON RAFT LYING IN KINGSTON. DICK BALLINGER ON RAFT.

CLINTON RAFT LYING IN KINGSTON. DICK BALLINGER ON RAFT. JUNE 1951

 

BIG BEACHCOMB RAFT UP SHORT NORMALLY IF YOU HAD ANY DISTANCE TO GO I WOULD PUT OUT 600 FEET OF TOWLINE TO GET THE RAFT AWAY FROM THE WHEELWASH.

BIG BEACHCOMB RAFT UP SHORT. NORMALLY IF YOU HAD ANY DISTANCE TO GO I WOULD PUT OUT 600 FEET OF TOWLINE TO GET THE RAFT AWAY FROM THE WHEELWASH.

 

 

SCALE SHEET FOR CLINTON RAFT.

SCALE SHEET FOR CLINTON RAFT.

 

 

"JERKMORE" AT SPEED.

“JERKMORE” AT SPEED.

 

BILL TO PIONEER TOWING FOR TOWING 8 SECTION RAFT FROM SHIP CANAL TO GAS PLANT STORAGE.

BILL TO PIONEER TOWING FOR TOWING 8-SECTION RAFT FROM SHIP CANAL TO GAS PLANT STORAGE.

 

BILL FOR LOCKING ASSISTS FOR 22 SECTIONS JULY 7 1951

BILL FOR LOCKING ASSISTS FOR 22 SECTIONS JULY 7 1951

 

AUTHORIZATION LETTER FROM SILER MILL CO. AUG 21 1951,

AUTHORIZATION LETTER FROM SILER MILL CO. AUG 21 1951,

 

MARK ON SHARON TUNA FISHING AUGUST 1951.  JACK McCRARY PHOTO

MARK ON SHARON TUNA FISHING AUGUST 1951. JACK McCRARY PHOTO

 

 

JACK McCRARY MY MENTOR ON SHARON AUG 1951 AT SEA.

JACK McCRARY MY MENTOR ON SHARON AUG 1951 AT SEA.

 

TOWING IN A DAYS WORK TO THE MILLERS BAY LOG STORAGE BACK FROM TUNA FISHING SEPT. 1951

TOWING IN A DAYS WORK TO THE MILLERS BAY LOG STORAGE BACK FROM TUNA FISHING SEPT. 1951

 

LOG SCALE OCT 10, 1951

LOG SCALE OCT 10, 1951

 

LOG COUNT ON NOVEMBER 13,1951. ITS BEEN A BUSY YEAR.

LOG COUNT ON NOVEMBER 13,1951. ITS BEEN A BUSY YEAR.

 

 

MARK'S REPORT CARD FROM LINCOLN HIGH SCHOOL ON JAN. 1951

MARK’S REPORT CARD FROM LINCOLN HIGH SCHOOL ON JAN. 1951

 

NOW FOR SOME LOCAL SHOTS, ENOUGH OF THAT OLD TIME STUFF.

 

"BLUEBERRY'S" OUT OF WATER REPAIRS ARE FINISHED AND SHE IS HEADED FOR WATER AT CSR.

“BLUEBERRY’S” OUT OF WATER REPAIRS ARE FINISHED AND SHE IS HEADED FOR WATER AT CSR.

 

PART OF OUR CREW ATR THE LAUNCHING OF THE "BLUEBERRY". FROM THE LEFT BRICE, BORNY AND CAPT. TOM.

PART OF OUR CREW AT THE LAUNCHING OF THE “BLUEBERRY”. FROM THE LEFT BRYCE, BORNIE AND CAPT. TOM.

 

"BLUEBERRY" ALMOST WET.

“BLUEBERRY” ALMOST WET.

 

"GENERAL LEE" TAKING"BLUEBERRY" IN TOW BACK TO FREMONT BOAT.

“GENERAL LEE” TAKING”BLUEBERRY” IN TOW BACK TO FREMONT BOAT.

 

"BLUEBERRY" HOME AT FREMONT BOAT NOW ALL WE HAVE TO DO IS PUT HER BACK TOGETHER AND THAT WILL TAKE A COUPLE OF MONTHS BECAUSE WE UNLOADED THE BOAT INTO A 20 FOOT CONTAINER AND THATS DOWN AT RIC'S, THANKYOU RIC.

“BLUEBERRY” HOME AT FREMONT BOAT.  NOW ALL WE HAVE TO DO IS PUT HER BACK TOGETHER AND THAT WILL TAKE A COUPLE OF MONTHS BECAUSE WE UNLOADED THE BOAT INTO A 20 FOOT CONTAINER AND THATS DOWN AT RIC’S, THANK YOU RIC!

 

"BLUEBERRY" IS SURE PRETTY WITHOUT ANY FENDERS BUT THAT WONT LAST VERY LONG.

“BLUEBERRY” IS SURE PRETTY WITHOUT ANY FENDERS BUT THAT WON’T LAST VERY LONG.

 

CAPT. ERIK AND THE "GENERAL LEE" TOWING OUR BARGE WITH THE COUGAR  FOOT BALL HELMET ON IT. HOW IS THAT FOR MAKING TROUBLE.

CAPT. ERIK AND THE “GENERAL LEE” TOWING OUR BARGE WITH THE COUGAR FOOTBALL HELMET ON IT. HOW IS THAT FOR MAKING TROUBLE?

 

"GENERAL LEE & JEEP" TOWING ANOTHER NEW HOUSE BOAT FROM FOSS TO WARDS COVE AND JUST CLEARING THE FREMONT BRIDGE.

“GENERAL LEE & JEEP” TOWING ANOTHER NEW HOUSEBOAT FROM FOSS TO WARDS COVE AND JUST CLEARING THE FREMONT BRIDGE.

 

ANOTHER VIEW JUST PASSING UNDER THE AURORA BRIDGE.

ANOTHER VIEW JUST PASSING UNDER THE AURORA BRIDGE.

 

OUR MAN IN VANCOUVER B.C., MIKE WRIGHT, SENDS ON CANADIAN PHOTOS OF TUGS.

 

"VIKING KING" IS SHE A GOOD LOOKING BOAT WITH HER BUFF PAINT.

“VIKING KING”.  SHE A GOOD LOOKING BOAT WITH HER BUFF PAINT.

 

"VICTORY XII  MIKES TUG.

“VICTORY XII”- MIKE’S TUG. I THINK WITH THAT NAME SHE WAS A STONE BROTHERS TUG, THEY HAD NEAT NAMES ON THEM.

 

STEAM TUG "PRESTIGE"

STEAM TUG “PRESTIGE”

 

"PRESTIGE" ANOTHER VIEW.

“PRESTIGE” ANOTHER VIEW.

 

THE NEXT SET IS TAKEN BY SCOTT SCHOCH OF OLYMPIA TUGBOAT RACING. IT WAS IN ONE OF ROBIN PATERSON’S SCRAP BOOKS THAT I GOT FROM KAE PATERSON.

 

START OF THE RACE FROM LEFT THE "MAGIE B, ISSWAT & CHEMAINUS YARDER.

START OF THE RACE FROM LEFT THE “MAGGIE B, ISSWAT & CHEMAINUS YARDER”.

 

SAME RACE FROM LEFT THE "MAGIE B, ISSWAT, CHEMAINUS YARDER, SALLY B AND IT LOOKS LIKE THE TWO BITS.

SAME RACE FROM LEFT THE “MAGGIE B, ISSWAT, CHEMAINUS YARDER, SALLY B” AND IT LOOKS LIKE THE “TWO BITS”.

 

DOUG PATERSON'S "CHEMAINUS YARDER"

DOUG PATERSON’S “CHEMAINUS YARDER”

 

BOB BURNS TUG THE "SALLY B"

BOB BURNS TUG THE “SALLY B”

 

'NOREEN AND SANDMAN" NECK AND NECK.

“NOREEN AND SANDMAN” NECK AND NECK.

 

ROBIN & KAE PATERSON'S "WINAMAC"

ROBIN & KAE PATERSON’S “WINAMAC”

 

HEY SCOTT THANKS FOR TAKING ALL THESE PHOTOS.

 

OUR MAN ON WHIDBEY ISLAND, STAN WILLHIGHT, SENDS ON MORE PHOTOS. THANKS STAN, WONDERFUL PHOTOS THAT YOU HAVE TAKEN OVER THE YEARS.

 

 

ANOTHER PHOTO OF STANS LATEST MODEL.

ANOTHER PHOTO OF STAN’S LATEST MODEL.

 

"SPIKE" 65 FOOT EX U. S. NAVY YTL. 3-21-1990

“SPIKE” 65 FOOT EX-U. S. NAVY YTL. 3-21-1990

 

"SEA CAP X" AT NEW WESTMINSTER 7-18-1990.

“SEA CAP X” AT NEW WESTMINSTER. 7-18-1990.

 

"PEGGY FOSS" KORT NOZZEL SISTER TO OUR "GRACE'. FOSS SOLD HER TO GRANT SNYDER ON THE OREGON COAST AND I UNDERSTAND THAT HER SOLD HER TO AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION

“PEGGY FOSS” KORT NOZZLE SISTER TO OUR “GRACE”. FOSS SOLD HER TO GRANT SNYDER ON THE OREGON COAST AND I UNDERSTAND THAT HE SOLD HER TO AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION. 7-5-1990

 

"JACQUES CARTIER" IN EVERETT IN 7-5-1990

“JACQUES CARTIER” IN EVERETT.  7-5-1990

 

FREMONT TUGS A-1 TOWING BOATS AFLOAT SHOW IN SHIP CANAL 8-21-1990

FREMONT TUGS “A-1″ TOWING BOATS AFLOAT SHOW IN SHIP CANAL. 8-21-1990

 

FREMONT TUGS "SKILLFUL" TAILING FLOAT TOW. 8-21-1990.

FREMONT TUGS “SKILLFUL” TAILING FLOAT TOW. 8-21-1990.

 

 

JON NORGAARD SENT ME THIS PHOTO OF THE “ARROW NO. 4″.

 

"ARROW NO. 4" BUILT IN 1937 BY ARROW TUG & BARGE IN ASTORIA.

“ARROW NO. 4″ BUILT IN 1937 BY ARROW TUG & BARGE IN ASTORIA.

 

RON BURCHETT, OUR OTHER MAN IN VANCOUVER B.C., SENT IN THESE OLDIES.

 

'ISLAND NAVIGATOR" A MIKI.

‘ISLAND NAVIGATOR” A MIKI.

 

 

"SUDBURY II" SHE WAS A U.S.NAVY SALVAGE VESSEL WITH FOUR 900 HP COOPER BESSEMER'S DIESEL ELECTRIC. I HAVE ONE OF HER LIFE RINGS.

“SUDBURY II” SHE WAS A U.S. NAVY SALVAGE VESSEL WITH FOUR 900 HP COOPER BESSEMER’S DIESEL ELECTRIC. I HAVE ONE OF HER LIFE RINGS.

 

 

"ISLAND COMMANDER"

“ISLAND COMMANDER”

 

"ISLAND SCAMP" NOW THATS MY KIND OF TUG.

“ISLAND SCAMP” NOW THATS MY KIND OF TUG.

 

THANKS RON - NICE TO HAVE YOU BACK IN TOWN.

 

HERE ARE SOME MORE LOCAL PHOTOS.

 

"SHELLFISH" INTO NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD FROM SEA.

“SHELLFISH” INTO NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD FROM SEA.

 

"AMERICAN LADY" HEADED FOR NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARGIE & I GET MORE PHOTOS GOING BACK AND FORTH TO WORK.

“AMERICAN LADY” HEADED FOR NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARGIE & I GET MORE PHOTOS GOING BACK AND FORTH TO WORK.

 

 

"BERING ROSE" HEADED FOR HER DOCK .

“BERING ROSE” HEADED FOR HER DOCK .

 

 

"DIXIE & GENERAL LEE" TOWING "BARANOF TO LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. sHE WAS A I80 BUOY TENDER FOR THE COAST GUARD WITH AN ICE BREAKER BOW.

“DIXIE & GENERAL LEE” TOWING “BARANOF” TO LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. SHE WAS A 180′ BUOY TENDER FOR THE COAST GUARD WITH AN ICE BREAKER BOW.

 

KEITH SCHERMERHORN DROPPED BY ON HIS WAY TO THE HISPITAL TO SHOW BE THE"TYEE SEA" IT WAS SO NEAT I AM GOING TO HAVE TO BUILD ONE.

KEITH SCHERMERHORN DROPPED BY TO SHOW ME THE “TYEE SEA”.  IT WAS SO NEAT I AM GOING TO HAVE TO BUILD ONE.

 

"GALENE" HEADED FOR HER BERTH AFTER WINNING THE OLYMPIA TUG BOAT RACE. SKIP IS FLYING THE CHECKERED FLAG AS WELL AS A BROOM AT THE MAST HEAD. BEAUTIFUL WELL KEPT MIKI.

“GALENE” HEADED FOR HER BERTH AFTER WINNING THE OLYMPIA TUG BOAT RACE. SKIP IS FLYING THE CHECKERED FLAG AS WELL AS A BROOM AT THE MAST HEAD. BEAUTIFUL WELL KEPT MIKI !!!!!!!!

 

SKIP AND CREW VISITED MY MUSEUM. THE FELLOW ON THE RIGHT IS FROM MAINE AND SERVED ON THE "GALENE" DURING WW II  -WOW-.

SKIP AND CREW  (EXCEPT FOR ME) VISITED  MY MUSEUM. THE FELLOW ON THE RIGHT IS FROM MAINE AND SERVED ON THE “GALENE” DURING WW II -WOW!.

 

OUR MAN IN COOS BAY, BOB RICHARDSON, SENDS ON THESE PHOTOS. THANKS BOB.

 

COAST GUARD 47 FOOTER TOWING A TROLLER IN.

COAST GUARD 47 FOOTER TOWING A TROLLER IN.

 

BIG SISTER OF THE "BLUEBERRY" TENDING BUOYS AT COOS BAY.

BIG SISTER OF THE “BLUEBERRY” TENDING BUOYS AT COOS BAY.

 

SAUSES'S NAVAJO INBOUND AT COOS BAY.

SAUSE’S “NAVAJO” INBOUND AT COOS BAY.

 

DUNLAP'S "SNOHOMISH" OUTBOUND AT COOS BAY.

DUNLAP’S “SNOHOMISH” OUTBOUND AT COOS BAY.

 

MORE LOCAL PHOTOS FROM OUR MAN ON THE TUGS, CAPT ERIK.

 

"DIXIE WITH BARANOF" ON THE WAY TO LAKE UNION DRY DOCK.

“DIXIE” WITH “BARANOF” ON THE WAY TO LAKE UNION DRY DOCK.

 

"BARANOF" IN DERYDOCK AT LAKE UNION DRY DOCK.

“BARANOF” IN DRY DOCK AT LAKE UNION DRY DOCK.

 

SEA & SHORE'S "PETER H" BUSY AS USUAL.

SEA & SHORE’S “PETER H”, BUSY AS USUAL.

 

RICHARD HAS THE THROTTLE IN THE COMPANY CORNER.

RICHARD HAS THE THROTTLE IN THE COMPANY CORNER.

 

KIRBY'S TUG THE "PACIFIC CHALLENGER" OFF WEST POINT, HOW DID ERIK GET CLEAR OUT HERE?.

KIRBY’S TUG THE “PACIFIC CHALLENGER” OFF WEST POINT. HOW DID ERIK GET CLEAR OUT HERE?.

 

"ALLISA ANN & DANIELLE" WORKING IN LAKE WASHINGTON ON SEAFAIR BOOMSTICKS.

“ALLISA ANN & DANIELLE” WORKING IN LAKE WASHINGTON ON SEAFAIR BOOMSTICKS.

 

"DIXIE" TOWING FLOATS FROM SEAFAIR FOR BOATS AFLOAT SHOW NEXT.

“DIXIE” TOWING FLOATS FROM SEAFAIR FOR BOATS AFLOAT SHOW.

 

YACHTS AT BOATS AFLOAT SHOW.

YACHTS AT BOATS AFLOAT SHOW.

 

"GREEN HOPE" BEING REBUILT.

“GREEN HOPE” BEING REBUILT.

 

"FLYER" SHIFTING GRAVEL BARGES AT SALMON BAY SAND & GRAVEL.

“FLYER” SHIFTING GRAVEL BARGES AT SALMON BAY SAND & GRAVEL.

 

"FLYER" JUST PASSING UNDER BALLARD BRIDGE.

“FLYER” JUST PASSING UNDER BALLARD BRIDGE.

 

"WASP" WITH HUGE GRAVEL BARGE.

“WASP” WITH HUGE GRAVEL BARGE

 

 

"GULF PROWLER" AT MARINE FLUID SYSTEMS.

“GULF PROWLER” AT MARINE FLUID SYSTEMS.

 

"DIXIE" AND TWO KIRBY TUGS THE"ADRIATIC SEA & PACIFIC CHALLENGER"

“DIXIE” AND TWO KIRBY TUGS THE “ADRIATIC SEA & PACIFIC CHALLENGER”

 

"BLUEBERRY" GOING BACK INTO SALMON BAY.

“BLUEBERRY” GOING BACK INTO SALMON BAY FROM CST BOATYARD.

 

"BLUE PACIFIC"

“BLUE PACIFIC”

 

"IMPALLA" TOWED "SEA WOLF" DOWN FROM KODIAK AFTER SHE LOST AN ENGINE. TOM & ERIK MET HER AND RELIEVED HER OF HER TOW AND TOOK THE "SEA WOLF" INTO RED SALMON PACK. WES HANSON IS HER SKIPPER AND I BOUGHT THE TUG "A-1" FROM HIS DAD.

“IMPALLA” TOWED “SEA WOLF” DOWN FROM DUTCH AFTER SHE LOST AN ENGINE. TOM & ERIK MET HER AND RELIEVED HER OF HER TOW AND TOOK THE “SEA WOLF” INTO RED SALMON PACK. WES HANSON IS HER SKIPPER AND I BOUGHT THE TUG “A-1″ FROM HIS DAD.

 

CAPT. ERIK ASSISTED THE "CAPE GREIG" AND LANCE INTO FISHERMANS TERMINAL.

CAPT. ERIK ASSISTED THE “CAPE GREIG” AND LANCE INTO FISHERMEN’S TERMINAL.

 

JUST IN FROM MICHAEL WRIGHT IN CANADA. THE FAMOUS TUG “IVANHOE” IS BEING BROKEN UP INSTEAD OF BEING SAVED FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS TO SEE AND HEAR HER RUN WITH THAT BIG UNION DIESEL. WHAT A SHAME.

 

SAD DAY.

SAD DAY.

 

SHE WAS A REAL BEAUTY.

SHE WAS A REAL BEAUTY.

 

THE UNION COMES OUT ALL 52 TONS OF IT. I HOPE SOMEONE SAVES ITAND DOESNT JUST GO TO THE STEEL MILL TO BE MADE INTO REINFORCING ROD.

THE UNION COMES OUT. I HOPE SOMEONE SAVES IT AND IT DOESN’T JUST GO TO THE STEEL MILL TO BE MADE INTO REINFORCING ROD.

 

STORY ABOUT THE IVANHOE FROM THE PACIFIC MOTORBOAT MAGAZINE MAY 1938.

 

 

IVANHOE - PACIFIC MOTORBOAT MAY 1938

 

IVANHOE

 

-IVANHOE - 2

 

Thanks to all of you who send in pictures and facts so that I can share the information one photo at a time.    Anything that you send me, I can scan and send back to you good as new.

     WANTED:

  1. Crowley decals and cloth patches for jackets of caps. The one I really like says “Red Stack Tugs”.

  2. Old Cary-Davis & Puget Sound Tug & Barge Photos & advertisements.

  3. Old cannery tender & log towing photos.

  4. We buy old tug and waterfront photos or collections and snapshots, as well as old (pre-1946) Marine Digest Magazines in any condition.

  5. Information wanted: in an article in the Yachting magazine, it stated that Doc Freeman bought a tug named  LEWIS II in 1943. He got her from Bellingham Tug & Barge and Nick Olson sent me the file from the Coast Guard on her and now I need a photo. Doc Freeman owned her in 1943. Other owners were Alan J. Bannon 1944; Ragnvald Johnson 1945; Albert R. Peterson of Port Townsend 1968-1971; Joe Douglass Pennock of Seattle 1974 and Harry R. McGahan of Aberdeen 1976. Anyone knowing any of these folks may lead me to a photo. Thanks Nick.

  6. Want builders plate off the Coast Guard Cutter BONHAM. I gave it to Jim Valentyne after dad bought the BONHAM.

All the best from:

Mark & Margie Freeman, Captains Erik & Tom, Miss Blue, Richie, Bryce, The Mark Freeman Maritime Museum, Tatoosh Towing & Salvage, Fremont Boat Co., Fremont Tugboat Co. and the three cats; Braveheart (Indy), Razz and Batman (all three cats came from a no-kill shelter about 4 years ago.)

Please donate to the Northwest Seaport to help repair the ARTHUR FOSS you saw the pictures of the CHICKAMAUGA being dismantled in Port Townsend we sure don’t want that to happen the ARTHUR FOSS.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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MARK FREEMAN’S “RUDDERLESS” AUGUST 23, 2014

CAPTAIN MARK.

CAPTAIN MARK.

 

 

OUR LOGO THANKS TO JOHNNY ADAMS WHO DREW IT AND BILL GARDEN GAVE ME PERMISSION TO USE IT AS HE DID FOR MANY YEARS.

OUR LOGO, THANKS TO JOHNNY ADAMS WHO DREW IT AND BILL GARDEN GAVE ME PERMISSION TO USE IT AS HE DID FOR MANY YEARS.

 

TOM MEDENDORP

 

 

I have completed the first run on all the tugs and workboats that my dad “Doc” owned or operated, bought and sold or sold on consignment. I am sure that I will find more and I will share them with you as I find them. Dad bought and sold well over a thousand boats of all types including freighters, tankers, sailing vessels, fish boats, fish packers, tugs and barges, charter vessels, and yachts and I don’t know how many surplus vessels, the list is endless.

Now I will share with you all the tugs and barges that I owned starting with the “SEAL ROCK” in 1948 which was a round-sided Navy dory used as an officer’s Gig on the four stack destroyers. I will list them by the year that I bought them. In 1948, I was 14.

     The SEAL ROCK, official number 30 M 1394; length 21 feet; beam 68 inches; draft 2.5 feet; power 8 horsepower; built as an officer’s gig for the U.S. NAVY four stack destroyers.

It was the summer of 1948 and I was working for dad pumping boats, painting boats, scrubbing boats and helping out at the Freeman & Gibson Marine store driving the A-frame truck – illegally of course. Boy was I ever busy in the ‘Doc Freeman sweat shop’. Dad says to me at the breakfast table “Do you want to come with me to look at surplus boats at Manchester and Bremerton?” Well, that’s like asking me if I like ice cream. My answer was “What ferry do we catch?” Oboy – a day out of the farm.

On the way over dad says to me “You know I have been watching this Navy Dory for a long time waiting for it to be declared surplus and come up for bid. It might be just the right size to make a small tug for you.” Well I just about fell off the ferry boat with that statement. He said “We will take a look at it and you will have to tell me what you think.” My god, my own tug. Incredible! Dad really put me in a tail spin.

We got off the ferry at Bremerton and drove over to the far side of the base and entered the base with armed guards all over the place. Lots 1 and 2 could be seen at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard at Bremerton and lots 3 to 10 could be seen at Orchard Point at Manchester. Lot 1 was a 36 ft LCPL landing barge and Lot 2 was a Motor Dory in poor shape but it sure looked like my first tug. Boy was I turned on, even at that age I could envision what it would like in Freeman colors but it needed a lot of work. We looked it over and first the 5 H.P. Buffalo gas engine was junk and the boat needed to be recaulked and it needed to be completely refinished especially the teak decks and the big oak guards.  Dad asked “What do you think?” I said “Well I think it will do just fine.” – trying to be sort of business-like but I felt like screaming “When do we get to take her home?” He said “Well I think I will bid $101.01 on her there probably won’t be very many people bid on her and right about then I started sweating out the bid opening that was on June, 16, 1948 Sale #B-49-48 which was about 3 weeks away. That was the longest three weeks in my life that I can remember.

We then jumped back into the car and headed for Manchester to look at the other boats that were up for bid. You talk about interesting! Small boats on that sale included: Lot 3 was a 45 foot Artillery boat; Lot 4 was a 35 foot plane rearming barge; lot 5 was a 36 ft LCVP landing barge; lot 6 was a 20 foot clinker built motor boat; Lot 7 was a 40 foot motor launch; Lot 8 was a 33 foot plane rearming boat; Lot 9 was a 36 foot LCVP and Lot 10 was a 19 foot commercial dory – like a cod fishing dory. All in poor condition, all needed repairs to make them float home if we were high bidder. We knew that if we were high bidder on the motor dory that we could not make her float and that we would have to put her inside a landing barge or a motor launch. I waited for the bid to open and my fertile mind was at full ahead. I asked dad how could I pay for all the repairs as I was going to school and was making only kids wages. When I went to work for him in 1942, I was 8 years old and was receiving a nickel an hour for pumping boats but I can’t remember what I was being paid in 1948, but if it was more than 25 cents an hour, I would be surprised. Of course dad was way ahead of me – he was always way ahead of me – and he said he would pay for the repairs and give me a final bill and that I would be paying interest on the principal. So, I was learning how business was done. I could do towing for him and others and maybe I could get a log patrol license and start beachcombing logs as he had noticed a lot of stray logs around in his travels. Boy he was way out in front in his plans for me (lucky me). Of course going to school was my first job and no matter what time I got in off his boats I went to school.

Three weeks went by and finally the day of the bid opening had arrived. Dad could not get any results till the next day so I don’t think I slept that night but after school the next day Dad finally told me that we (he) was high bidder on the motor dory and that got me going in the tug boat business.

The U.S. NAVY used the round-sided Dorys as officer gigs on the four stack destroyers – that was the purpose of the round steel house with two portholes there also were two small benches forward where the officers could sit out of the weather. They had a flat bottom just like a regular dory with a heavy keel extending thru the bottom, they had to be quite strong to be lifted by davits. Typical of Navy boats, they had beautiful cast bronze guards over the stern and stem for complete protection. I guess the correct names for them would be stem iron and stern iron.  They were planked with either one inch or ¾ inch cypress with teak decks and two big round oak guards about 2½ inches in diameter with a shear strake made of oak between the two guards about six inches wide. Of course this had to have all the old varnish removed before I could apply new. I don’t remember what other boats we got on the sale but we had to have something to put the dory into because she would not float. We might have taken an LCVP with us because I can remember stuffing her into a landing barge and Jack McCrary saying now she will get home safely. We picked up some more boats at Manchester and towed them all home. We unloaded her with the crane at Seth Greens dry-dock where Tillicum Marina is now and made her float long enough to tow her into dad’s boathouse. Jack and I had chain falls rigged so we slid her into the shed and hooked up the chain falls to her lifting rings and lifted her high enough to let the water drain out of the seams and then slip some 4” x 12” planks under her. We let her down onto the planks and the shipyard was ready for her and so was I but I had to go to school and dad’s fleet needed pumping and the cows needed to be milked.

The rebuild went slowly. Jack would work on her – he pulled the Navy engine out of her and started recaulking her and I spent a lot of time removing paint & varnish. Dad put an ad in the Times and PI looking for a small engine and several engines were looked at. He bought an 8 horsepower Universal Fisherman for $125.00. It was a single cylinder gas engine – of course it was hand crank to start, turning 1200 RPM. We figured it out with Don Thomas from Olympic Propeller that she would swing a 14 inch diameter with a 12 inch pitch but that was more of a running light wheel it turned out. She was my first and last boat with teak decks and white seam compound, I really made her shine: lots of man-o-war varnish. I painted the hull black and had a white boot stripe with the house Freeman Buff and inside the hull & house Malachy Green. Jack installed the Universal and built a box around the engine with removable panel and put the throttle on the side of the box and side steering with a big lever. She had an oak tow bitt and a bow bitt but she needed tow lights. She only had a hot shot battery for the engine ignition which ran a ford coil which you adjust manually which was called advancing or retarding the spark. You always retarded the spark when starting the engine so that you did not get a backfire and have the crank break your wrist.

My mother, May, had some pretty fancy salt and pepper shakers so I appropriated two which looked like Fresnel lenses and had a big enough opening to get a very small 6 volt bulb inside and with the 32 point top light, I could display 3 white 32 pt lights for a lighted tow astern. For unlit logs you needed a white, two reds and a white so I made a submerged string that was just the right length and taped it to the mast for 6 volt bulbs and of course a red and green combination running light. I got a Cunningham No. 1 air whistle and a surplus hand air pump and with some adjusting, and a really thin diaphragm, I got the whistle to blow on really low air pressure.

We worked on the boat for a long time but finally one afternoon we lowered her into the water and let her hang in the slings for a couple of days while the seams tightened up.  With some coaxing I got the engine started. She had a primer cock on top of the cylinder head where you could pour raw gas into the cylinder and the exhaust was out the port side. Turns out to be a very reliable engine except when I would go on the beach to get a log and leave the engine on the idle. Sometimes a piece of carbon would get under the valve and you would lose compression and the engine would quit. I got pretty clever in fixing that problem – I had a set of tools in a box in the engine compartment which consisted of the right socket and the ½ inch drive wrench to fit it to take off the head nuts and a couple of screwdrivers to lift the head and a real thin screwdriver that would fit in under the valve to get the offending piece of carbon out so that I would get compression back. A squirt from the oil can, which was filled with gas, and away she would go: put-put-put-put. The engine quitting always seemed to happen when the tide was falling and that means that I could get stuck on the beach so with having to take the head off I had to keep the boat with its stern pointed out by using a pike pole or just push her off the beach into deeper water and hurry!

Her name came from my first trip up the coast when I helped dad bring home the FEATHER (which was a 50 foot ex-Army Engineers boat built by Stephens) from Portland to Seattle in 1948. On the way up the coast we passed Seal Rock and that’s where the name came from. I called my new company Tatoosh Towing Service and later changed the last name to Salvage. I still have the sign off our Millers Bay log storage that I painted that says Tatoosh Towing and Salvage  EV-1500 – which was our phone number.

After we got the boat running Dad gave me the bill for her at the dinner table. That was the great meeting place because he knew that we would be at the table or out working for him so he always caught us one way or the other. The bill was for $650.00 plus sales tax, plus interest. I was learning. He kind of gave me a funny look like when was I going to start paying him back and why wasn’t I out working instead of eating dinner. It was a very serious moment. That led into what he was getting at: how was I going to make some money because now I was in debt to him. But he had some ideas on that subject, now that he had my attention.

He knew these two fellows who had the master log patrol license #2; of course I knew them also: Joe Boles and Lynn Campbell. They were in deals with dad all the time; in fact, Joe and dad bought the steamer VIRGINIA V together during the war and they had a lot to do with running war workers between the foot of Washington Street and Todd’s Dry-dock which dad had the SPEEDER on.

Anyway, Dad sent away for all the paper work from them and the State that regulated the log business and pretty soon I had a log Patrol License under their license. Dad said he had been watching all these saw logs lying on the different beaches and he thought that was one way to make some money. Lake Washington and the Ship Canal were full of logs and mills and log dumps and storages and the tugs towed log rafts into the lake where they were stored all the time because there were no toredos or marine borers in fresh water. That is why you paint the bottom of the boats with copper paint and you use creosote piling in salt water because that stops the bugs from chewing up your investment. When we salvaged the PACIFIC QUEEN in Tacoma Harbor she was down for 9 months and her upper stern, which did not have any copper paint, was just riddled with holes as big as your thumb from the bugs. So you either cut up the logs in the saw mill or you got them into fresh water storage or in shallow salt water log storages that were dry with the tide out. The State did not want log pirates and there were some very strict rules about logs: You cannot work around a storage where it is obvious where the logs came from. You cannot work some areas where there has been a major reported log spill. You cannot put an unbranded log into the water west of the Cascade Mountains.

What would happen is: I would beachcomb a bunch of logs and tow them into Joe and Lynn’s storage up the Duwamish River and then they would have them scaled and I would be paid a percentage of the logs value and get a scale sheet showing all the logs. They would store them on my dog gear until they had been scaled and then they would knock out my dog gear and I would pick it up from them. More later on dog gear. I started beachcombing logs in Laurelhurst; it was a fertile ground with all the tugs and log tows going in and out of Lake Washington that had to pass Webster Point. There were big storages in Union Bay on the south side and regular deep draft tugs could not go onto the flats but my little shallow boat did just fine. Another area was from Webster Point to Sand Point – there is quite an exposure to SE winds and waves so that was always good picking. I always looked out the window on to the lake to see if there were any drifters. Everywhere I went, I looked for loose logs and of course so did dad. I stored my beachcombed logs in the lake at our Northlake Boat Sales yard where Gas Works Marina is now. We had some outer dolphins that were not handy to tie boats to so I would keep my logs there till I had 50 or more and then I would take dad’s 50 foot tug the MIZPAH and tow them thru the locks across Seattle Harbor and up the West Waterway to Joe and Lynn’s storage near Siler Mill. So I was learning how to salvage logs and tow logs and paying off the SEAL ROCK. I had an opportunity on Christmas vacation to go with Pat Stoppelman, my future brother-in-law, on a real beachcombing expedition. Pat owned this 40 foot tug the VAMOOSE powered by a 55 horsepower Atlas heavy duty diesel and he had one of the ten pusher tugs that we had brought in from California. He called her the MAY and she would be our jerk boat. So off we went in the dead of winter. We had to tow two 36 foot LCVP landing barges to Everett, after tying those up in a blizzard we took off for Sandy Point in Saratoga Passage then up to Utsalady and anchored up for a few hours sleep.  My berth was under the forward hatch which we referred to as the Glory Hole. It was toasty warm when I crawled into the sack but it cooled off with the Atlas shut down and it was downright cold when Pat hollered at me to get up. I tried to lift the hatch but it had about 6 inches of snow on it – maybe I should just stay inside for the day?  We had breakfast and it was time to go to work. There were quite a few good logs on the Stick Point shore, on the chart it is called Strawberry Pt.

I was going to work the beach that means take a shovel and a peavey and get your hip boots on. Pat would nose up to the beach and I would wade out to meet him and he would give me the end of his tow line and chain and I would attach it to the log. But when I got ashore I could not tell the good logs from the junk logs because they were buried in snow and neither could Pat. So he came ashore and we started to scrape the snow off the logs trying to find the good ones. It was a long slow process and then it turned northerly and got real cold. We got several logs off the beach but the poor little MAY was so light that I could almost roll a log with my peavey better because even with chain wraps on the log to make it roll the May would run out fast with enough tow line out to get good speed up and bam she would just stop and the log would not move. So I dug the sand out as best as I could to make the log roll easier, it was very frustrating. When you are beachcombing you don’t wear caulk boots, you wear hip boots and of course I got on a slippery log and made the bay – god it was cold – but I was learning my trade. Pat and I worked at it for several days till I had to go back to school and of course I broke the brake drum on the hand cranked anchor winch on the VAMOOSE by stepping on it too hard. But Pat went back to it when the weather cleared and used the VAMOOSE to jerk the bigger logs down the beach. My folks picked me up at Utsalady and we drove back to town. Pat always kidded me about making one trip with him was all it took to make me a very successful beachcomber.

Dog gear is what you use to tie up the logs to make a raft as you get the logs off the beach. A dog is made of steel – it is like a tapered giant spike with a hole in the top and you would use a 3/8 inch or half inch wire or ¼ inch chain threaded through the hole. The wire or chain would be 50 to 70 feet long with 20 to 40 dogs strung on the wire and a dog in each end of the wire. After the first log was pulled off the beach you would hammer in the center dog (of the 20 or 40) with your dog axe about one third of the way back on the log, so that you could build your brail of logs by adding logs on either side of the center and have spare dogs on each side. I always tried to get a boom stick or a big log for the starter log.

Boom sticks are long – usually 66 feet – and it is easier to tie the second brail to the longer log. Big logs tend to ride better in the center of the brail. I used have at least 15 or 20 dog lines at the ready. The longer dog lines were for the log towers to secure individual logs in the front and back sections of their log tow that were exposed to the most wave action. If you were towing flat rafts and the wind blew 10 to 15 miles per hour (depending on where you were), you started looking for a hiding place because you were going to start losing logs. Bundle rafts will stand a lot more weather as they build the bundle on the logging truck by running wires around the load of logs before they dump it in the water and the shear bulk of it makes it ride the waves better.

I also made up a lot of tag lines which were ½ inch to 1 inch line with a dog spliced in on both ends. I would make up longer tag lines and have 2 or 3 dogs on the line besides the end dogs.

I also put swifter lines across the back end of each brail. Swifter lines were typically ½” line with a dog in each end and were used to hold the back end of the logs in line. The logs I collected would stay on the dog lines and be towed in to Joe & Lynn who would have them scaled and then I would get my dog gear back after they were re-rafted or went to the mill.

In the spring of 1949 when the weather started getting better I started working the Sound; of course when working out of the lake you always wanted to be working on the flood tide so the logs didn’t have so far to go to be floating. I started working either side of the entrance to Shilshole as far as West Point and down past Golden Gardens, this was always a fertile area because of the swift currents and waves just outside the Locks. I then expanded to Jefferson Head and to Millers Bay. There was always a problem as to where to safely keep the logs I gathered; but, my folks had a 200 foot dock and a scow house in Millers Bay. So I made the dock into my log storage area and when I had a raft built I would run our tug the MIZPAH over and make the tow up the West Waterway. Of course I had to start learning the currents and how to tow logs on Puget Sound because regular log rafts tow at 1 ½ miles an hour and beach combed rafts at about 2 miles an hour. So, you had to have at least half tide to get in and out of Millers Bay because it was so shallow.

I always worked the SEAL ROCK by myself. There wasn’t room for two and I had a boat to pay off. To get a log off the beach I would nose the boat ashore, leave the engine in gear and slide over the side with my hip boots on – usually it was not too deep for my boots. I would drag my one inch manila tow line along with a chain with a bigger shackle on the end. If the log was floating I would just choke the log with the chain so that the chain would come tight against itself, crawl back onboard, leave the right amount of slack and tie the tow line off on the stern tow bitt and the boat would naturally end up with its bow pointing seaward. Then I’d back up so I had slack in the tow line, put the boat in gear and advance the throttle – the theory was when the line came tight the weight of the boat would jerk the log off the beach; or, if you put turns on the chain, it would roll the log into the water.

Then I would shorten the towline and dog up the log and tow the brail down to the next log and repeat. The logs would just drift – or sometimes stay in place if the dogs hung down in the water.

I broke the cartilage in my knee playing basketball at Lincoln High School and the doctor put it in a cast. After about a week in the cast I got nervous so I went back to beachcombing logs but my knee had shrunk up inside the cast and was quite flexible so I just went back to work climbing over the side of the boat to get ashore. The only thing that I did differently was not getting on the raft that I was building, instead I dogged up from inside the boat. I got a short handled axe and a 2 lb hammer to do this from the boat. It took about three weeks to get out of the cast but it seemed to have cured the problem.

I towed a lot of different stuff you would be surprised how much you could tow with just 8 horsepower.  The heaviest were the logs and they were a slow go. I got to deliver a lot of surplus hulls after we had sold them and one thing that was very popular were the steel life rafts. They were about 10 or 12 feet wide and square and had compartments that could be gotten into from either side depending on how the raft landed in the water. Of course the first thing that we did was open up the compartments to see if there was anything left in them; they always had malted milk balls which were excellent. Of course being hollow on each side they towed just like logs, the hollow made a huge vacuum and even the big tugs could not make any speed with them. The people that bought them used them for swim floats at their beach front homes. I would load a big anchor and the right length of chain and I would tow all day to get it to the right spot; then sound the depth of the water or better yet have the home owner tell me to drop the anchor that way I didn’t get it in the wrong spot. The rafts were thin steel so they didn’t last too long but if they sunk at least they were out of sight.

I towed two of them to Millers Bay and installed them at the end of our dock for the gang plank to land on but they didn’t last very long, I think we got about a year out of them, but they always produced good towing money.

One day I am talking to Ned Brainard, who was the head salesman next door at Vesoja’s Marine, and a good friend. Ned comes up to me and says “Mark, I bet that one of my new 10 horsepower Johnson outboards will pull your tug backwards.” I did a quick calculation and I said “I think you are dead wrong Ned – why don’t you just back up one of your high powered boats and we will find out.” Of course I was young and dumb and cocky but I wasn’t quite so cocky when Ned pulled me backwards but I was learning. Of course the new outboard had two more horsepower and got its turns quicker and though the Universal was trying, once it started backwards, it got worse. But to be pulled backwards by an outboard that was just plain awful. Life is just plum full of lessons and the younger you are the worse the lessons. Ned took the wind out of my sails.

Eventually, I got the SEAL ROCK paid off and evidently I had good credit as my dad says “You know, I see a lot of logs on the beaches that you can’t pull off with the little SEAL ROCK.”  I could not disagree with him and that led to another set of problems called the JERKMORE but that is another story.

 

 

 

GOV. BID SHEET FOR MOTOR DORY AND OTHER BOATS.

GOV.BID SHEET FOR MOTOR DORY AND OTHER BOATS.

 

 

SEAL ROCK IS # 2 ON LIST.

SEAL ROCK IS # 2 ON LIST

 

MY FIRST BUSINESS CARD

MY FIRST BUSINESS CARD

 

MY LOG PATROL LICENSE FOR THE "SEAL ROCK"

MY LOG PATROL LICENSE FOR THE “SEAL ROCK”

 

BOW OF THE SEAL ROCK.

BOW OF THE SEAL ROCK.

 

STERN OF "SEAL ROCK"

STERN OF “SEAL ROCK”

 

 

MY SISTER MERRY AND I ON "SEAL ROCK".

MY SISTER MERRY AND I ON “SEAL ROCK”.

 

 

FROM LEFT MARK, COUSIN AL AND MERRY.

FROM LEFT MARK, COUSIN AL AND MERRY.

 

 

MARK ON THE "SEAL ROCK".

MARK ON THE “SEAL ROCK”.

 

 

MARK ON THE STERN OF THE "SEAL ROCK". HARRY KIRWIN PHOTO.

MARK ON THE STERN OF THE “SEAL ROCK”. HARRY KIRWIN PHOTO.

 

 

"SEAL ROCK" IN PORT MADISON. MAY FREEMAN PHOTO.

“SEAL ROCK” IN PORT MADISON. MAY FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

MARK TRYING TO FIGURE OUT WHY IT WONT START. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

MARK TRYING TO FIGURE OUT WHY IT WON’T START. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TOOLS OF THE TRADE. TOP LAWNTERN JACK, PEAVEY , DOG AXE AND FOUR RAFTING DOGS.

TOOLS OF THE TRADE. TOP LANTERN JACK, PEAVEY , DOG AXE AND FOUR RAFTING DOGS.

 

 

ARTICLE FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE OF DEC. 1948

ARTICLE FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE OF DEC. 1948

 

 

014

 

CURRENT LOCAL PHOTOS.

 

HERE IS A REAL CAPTAIN. CAPTAIN RON ERNEST ON DUCK DODGE NIGHT RON KEEPS HIS SAILBOAT ON DOCK #6.

HERE IS A REAL CAPTAIN. CAPTAIN RON ERNST ON DUCK DODGE NIGHT.   RON KEEPS HIS SAILBOAT ON DOCK #6.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PIRATE SHIP "GALENE"

PIRATE SHIP “GALENE”

 

 

 

 

 

BATMAN THE UPSTAIRS OFFICE CAT. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

BATMAN THE UPSTAIRS OFFICE CAT. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"BLUEBERRY" STARTING TO GET SOME PAINT ON.

“BLUEBERRY” STARTING TO GET SOME PAINT ON.

 

CAPT. ERIK SURVEYING THE MESS IN THE "BLUEBERRY"

CAPT. ERIK SURVEYING THE MESS IN THE “BLUEBERRY”

 

CAPT. ERIK AND  MARGIE ARE BOTH GRINNING SO IT MUST BE GOING OK.

CAPT. ERIK AND MARGIE ARE BOTH GRINNING SO IT MUST BE GOING OK.

 

 

RICHIS,ERIK,TOM AND BRYCE IN THE SHADE OF COURSE. bOAT BUILDING CREW HAVING LUNCH.

RICHIE, ERIK, TOM AND BRYCE  IN THE SHADE, OF COURSE. BOAT BUILDING CREW HAVING LUNCH UNDER BOW OF “BLUEBERRY”.

 

 

RICHIE TOMS ASSISTANT.

RICHIE - TOM’S ABLE ASSISTANT.

 

BRYCE WORING UNDER STERN OF "BLUEBERRY". MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

BRYCE WORKING UNDER STERN OF “BLUEBERRY”. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

NEW STERN WHEELER ON THE LAKE BUT THIS ONE IS FOOT POWERED.

NEW STERN WHEELER ON THE LAKE BUT THIS ONE IS FOOT POWERED.

 

"SALLY S" OUT FOR AN AFTERNOON. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

“SALLY S” OUT FOR AN AFTERNOON. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"ISLAND STORM" PUSHING ONE AHEAD. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

“ISLAND STORM” PUSHING ONE AHEAD. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

U.S.LIBERATOR CAME HOME ON SUNDAY AFTERNOON.

U.S. LIBERATOR CAME HOME ON SUNDAY AFTERNOON.

 

BEST SUNSET OF THE YEAR. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

BEST SUNSET OF THE YEAR. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

WE HAD TO MOVE A BURIED  CRUISE SHIP INTO DRYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD.

 

 

"DIXIE" WORKING THE PROBLEM AT THE END OF I-5 PIER

“DIXIE” WORKING THE PROBLEM AT THE END OF I-90 PIER

 

"DIXIE" MOVING A BIG TUG OUT OF THE WAY

“DIXIE” MOVING A BIG TUG OUT OF THE WAY.

 

 

r

“GRACE” WAITING FOR ROOM TO HELP “DIXIE”

 

"GRACE" PUSHING ON BIG TUG.

“GRACE” PUSHING ON BIG TUG.

 

"GRACE" GOING INSHORE TO PUSH ON "JIMMY SMITH"

“GRACE” GOING INSHORE TO PUSH ON “JIMMY SMITH”

 

 

"GRACE" PUSHING ON JIMMY SMITH"

“GRACE” PUSHING ON JIMMY SMITH”

 

"GRACE" WAITING FOR "DIXIE" TO GET IN AND MAKE UP TO CRUISE SHIP "SPIRIT OF GLACIER BAY"

“GRACE” WAITING FOR “DIXIE” TO GET IN AND MAKE UP TO CRUISE SHIP “SPIRIT OF GLACIER BAY”

 

"GRACE & DIXIE" START HER OUT OF THE HOLE.

“GRACE & DIXIE” START HER OUT OF THE HOLE.

 

"GRACE" ALONGSIDE LOTS OF WESTERLY WIND THAT DAY.

“GRACE” ALONGSIDE - LOTS OF WESTERLY WIND THAT DAY.

 

"GRACE" PUSHING ON HER STERN BECAUSE SHE HAS TO GO INTO DRY DOCK STERN FIRST SO IT HAS TO GO A LOT UPWIND.

“GRACE” PUSHING ON HER STERN BECAUSE SHE HAS TO GO INTO DRY DOCK STERN FIRST SO IT HAS TO GO A LOT UPWIND.

 

JUST ENTERING THE DRYDOCK.

JUST ENTERING THE DRYDOCK.

 

ROGER OTENBACH CAME FOR A VISIT.

ROGER OTTENBACH CAME FOR A VISIT.

STABBERT YACHT AND SHIP WILL SCRAP THE HELENA STAR AFTER HER SINKING.

 

 

BOY IS SHE A MESS.

BOY IS SHE A MESS.

"DIXIE" GETTING READY TO MAKE UP TO "HELENA STAR"

“DIXIE” GETTING READY TO MAKE UP TO “HELENA STAR”

 

"DIXIE" AND RESOLVE MARINE BARGE AT STABBERTS.

“DIXIE” AND RESOLVE MARINE BARGE AT STABBERTS.

 

SAFE AT LAST."HELENA STAR" IN DRY DOCK.

SAFE AT LAST.”HELENA STAR” IN DRY DOCK.

 

"DIXIE" AND "DISCOVERY STAR" WE TOWED HER FROM STABBERTS TO NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD..

“DIXIE” AND “DISCOVERY STAR” WE TOWED HER FROM STABBERTS TO NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD..

 

"DIXIE AND DISCOVERY STAR"

“DIXIE AND DISCOVERY STAR”

 

GENERAL LEE PUSHING HER END INTO I-90 PIER.

GENERAL LEE PUSHING HER END INTO I-90 PIER.

 

MARGIE AND BATMAN.

MARGIE AND BATMAN.

 

"GENERAL LEE & DIXIE" SHIFTING "PACIFIC STAR" TO STABBERTS FROM RED SALMON.

“GENERAL LEE & DIXIE” SHIFTING “PACIFIC STAR” TO STABBERTS FROM RED SALMON.

 

DOWN THRU THE BRIDGES.

DOWN THRU THE BRIDGES.

 

 

SEA&SHORE BUSY AS USUAL.

SEA & SHORE, BUSY AS USUAL.

 

"TERRI L. BRUSCO IN THE LAKE.

“TERRI L. BRUSCO” IN THE LAKE.

 

BATMAN HAS FILLED OUT A LITTLE WITH AGE.

BATMAN HAS FILLED OUT A LITTLE WITH AGE.

 

MARGIE AND BRYCE AND THE "BLUEBERRY" IS GOING BACK TOGETHER VERY NICELY AND THE NEW PAINT REALLY LOOKS GOOD.

MARGIE WITH BRYCE AND RICHIE. “BLUEBERRY” IS GOING BACK TOGETHER VERY NICELY AND THE NEW PAINT REALLY LOOKS GOOD.

 

 

"ISLAND STORM" PUSHING ONE AHEAD.

“ISLAND STORM” PUSHING ONE AHEAD.

 

"FURY" PUSHING ONE AHEAD. SHE WAS A YTL AL LIESKI BUILT THAT HIGH HOUSE ON HER SO YOU CAN SEE BETTER. I HEAR THAT LARRY JAY SOLD THE COMPANY?

“FURY” PUSHING ONE AHEAD. SHE WAS A YTL THAT AL LIESKI BUILT THE HIGH HOUSE ON SO YOU CAN SEE BETTER. I HEAR THAT LARRY JAY SOLD THE COMPANY?

 

 

"CORBIN FOSS" I HEAR THAT SHE IS GOING TO TOW A CARRIER AROUND SOUTH AMERICA TO TEXAS?. SHE WAS ONE OF TWO TUGS THAT MARINE POWER & EQUIPMENT BUILT BUT NEVER FINISHED. FOSS NOW OWNS THEM BOTH.

“CORBIN FOSS” I HEAR THAT SHE IS GOING TO TOW A CARRIER AROUND SOUTH AMERICA TO TEXAS. SHE WAS ONE OF TWO TUGS THAT MARINE POWER & EQUIPMENT BUILT BUT NEVER FINISHED. FOSS NOW OWNS THEM BOTH.

 

"ZOLOTOI & OCEAN PROWLER IN BALLARD.

“ZOLOTOI & OCEAN PROWLER IN BALLARD.

 

"EQUATOR" BEAUTIFUL SEINER I SOLD HER FOR MR SMITH OF EVERETT IN THE 1960S.

“EQUATOR” – A BEAUTIFUL SEINER. I SOLD HER FOR MR. SMITH OF EVERETT IN THE 1960′s.

 

" ARGONAUT II SOMEBODY IS KEEPING HER IN GREAT SHAPE. GREAT LOOKING BOAT SHE WAS CANADIAN AND IS FOR SALE. NOW IF I DIDNT OWN THE BLUEBERRY MAYBE.

“ARGONAUT II”. SOMEBODY IS KEEPING HER IN GREAT SHAPE. GREAT LOOKING BOAT SHE WAS CANADIAN AND IS FOR SALE. NOW IF I DIDN’T OWN THE BLUEBERRY… MAYBE.

 

 

TUG "R.W.CONFER" CAME BY OUR HOUSEBOAT.

TUG “R.W.CONFER” CAME BY OUR HOUSEBOAT.

 

WE WERE JUST GOING HOME ON OUR LONG COMMUTE AND WE SAW THE "REDWOOD CITY" UNDER THYE FREMONT BRIDGE SO WE WAITED A MINUTE AND MARGIE SNAPPED HER. SHE BELONGS TO STAR MARINE AND GREG BOUGHT HER IN CALIFORNIA.

WE WERE JUST GOING HOME, ON OUR LONG COMMUTE, AND WE SAW THE “REDWOOD CITY” UNDER THE FREMONT BRIDGE SO WE WAITED A MINUTE AND MARGIE SNAPPED HER. SHE BELONGS TO STAR MARINE AND GREG BOUGHT HER IN CALIFORNIA.

 

OUR MAN IN MAINE, BILL PAGE, IS TAKING A LITTLE CRUISE ON HIS BRAND NEW BOAT THAT HE BUILT FROM A SET OF PLANS THAT OUR OLD FRIEND BILL GARDEN DREW.

 

BILL & PAULA  PAGE ARE HAVING A LITTLE PLAY TIME ON THE SERIANA.

BILL & PAULA PAGE ARE HAVING A LITTLE PLAY TIME ON THE SERIANNA.

 

 

BILL SENT ALONG THIS PHOTO OF THE CRAIG TRANS WHICH IS THE OLD CRAIG FOSS AN LT. FOSS SOLD HER AND SHE FELL ON HARD TIMES. I THINK THAT SHE IS IN HALIFAX.

BILL SENT ALONG THIS PHOTO OF THE CRAIG TRANS WHICH IS THE OLD CRAIG FOSS AN LT.     FOSS SOLD HER AND SHE FELL ON HARD TIMES. I THINK THAT SHE IS IN HALIFAX.

 

 

OUR MAN ON WHIDBEY ISLAND, STAN WILLHIGHT, SENDS ON MANY FINE BLACK & WHITE TUGBOAT PHOTOS, STAN HAS TAKEN A LOT OF PHOTOS. THANKS FOR SHARING THEM WITH US.

 

 

STAN JUST BUILT THIS MODEL TUG NOW THATS HOW TUGS OUGHT TO LOOK.

STAN JUST BUILT THIS MODEL TUG NOW THAT’S HOW TUGS OUGHT TO LOOK.

 

 

5-2-1990 WINAMAC SHE WAS A CANADIAN LOG TOWER. ROB & KAE PATTERSON BROUGHT HER IN TO THE STATES. ON EASTER SUNDAY IN 1953 SHE TOOK A 20 SECTION TOW FROM US AT DEER HARBOR THAT WE HAD JUST BUILT. SHE HAD A GARDNER IN HER THEN AND BOY WOULD SHE PULL.

5-2-1990 “WINAMAC”.  SHE WAS A CANADIAN LOG TOWER THAT ROB & KAE PATERSON BROUGHT IN TO THE STATES.     ON EASTER SUNDAY IN 1953, SHE TOOK A 20 SECTION TOW FROM US AT DEER HARBOR THAT WE HAD JUST BUILT. SHE HAD A GARDNER IN HER THEN AND BOY WOULD SHE PULL. SHE IS NO LONGER WITH US.

 

 

 

3-19-1990 "SEASPAN VOYAGER" IN BELLINGHAM.

3-19-1990 “SEASPAN VOYAGER” IN BELLINGHAM.

 

"JOE C" TOWING DAVE UPDIKES MIKI THE "RELIEF" JUST ENTERING LAKE UNION.

“JOE C” TOWING DAVE UPDIKE’S MIKI THE “RELIEF” JUST ENTERING LAKE UNION.

 

7-12-1990 "TARTAR" BILL GILBERT HAD HER BUILT BY CENTRAL SHEETMETAL TO TOW HIS PILEDRIVER. BILL GARDEN DESIGNED HER. ERIK AND TOM OWN HER NOW AND THEY HAVE COMPLETLY REBUILT HER AND SHE HAS HER BUFF PAINT ON HER.

7-12-1990 “TARTAR” BILL GILBERT HAD HER BUILT BY CENTRAL SHEETMETAL TO TOW HIS PILEDRIVER. BILL GARDEN DESIGNED HER. ERIK AND TOM OWN HER NOW AND ARE IN THE PROCESS OF REBUILDING HER.  SHE NOW HAS HER BUFF PAINT ON HER.

 

8-21-1990 "PT PIONEER" POPE & TALBOT BUILT HER  BECAUSE BOYERS "SUSAN H" WAS SUCH A SUCCESS. SHE HAD A 260 HORSEPOWER WASHINGTON AND LATER A D353 CAT 400 HORSEPOWER. WHEN THEY SHUT THE MILL AT PORT GAMBLE THEY SOLD HER AND SHE WENT TO CANADA BUT I UNDERSTAND THAT SHE IS BACK IN THE STATES.

8-21-1990 “PT PIONEER”. POPE & TALBOT BUILT HER BECAUSE BOYERS “SUSAN H” WAS SUCH A SUCCESS. SHE HAD A 260 HORSEPOWER WASHINGTON AND LATER A D353 CAT WITH 400 HORSEPOWER. WHEN THEY SHUT THE MILL AT PORT GAMBLE THEY SOLD HER AND SHE WENT TO CANADA BUT I UNDERSTAND THAT SHE IS BACK IN THE STATES. WE TIED HER UP HERE AT FREMONT BOAT WHILE WAITING FOR THE AUCTION

 

"PT PIONEER" WIOTH LOG TOW COMING UP ON THE BALLARD BRIDGE.

“PT PIONEER” WITH LOG TOW COMING UP ON THE BALLARD BRIDGE.

 

4-26-1990CANADIAN TUG "PACIFIC STANDARD" AT VANCOUVER BC.

4-26-1990 CANADIAN TUG “PACIFIC STANDARD” AT VANCOUVER BC.

 

AGNES FOSS IN WORLD WAR II COLORS.

AGNES FOSS IN WORLD WAR II COLORS.

 

 

 MORE LOCAL PHOTOS.

 

"DIXIE & GENERAL LEE" JUST CLEARING THE FREMONT BRIDGE ON THE WAY TO NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD FROM THE TERMINAL. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE & GENERAL LEE” JUST CLEARING THE FREMONT BRIDGE ON THE WAY TO NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD FROM THE TERMINAL. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

CAPT. TOM CLOSING ON HIS ESCORT TUG. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

CAPT. TOM CLOSING ON HIS ESCORT TUG. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

 

TUG'S "DIXIE & GENERAL LEE" LANDING "MYSTERY BAY" AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD UNDER THE BIG CRANE AND ITS NICE SHADE OF ORANGE.

TUGS “DIXIE & GENERAL LEE” LANDING “MYSTERY BAY” AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD UNDER THE BIG CRANE AND ITS NICE SHADE OF ORANGE.

 

 

F,V "ALASKA MIST" UP FOR REPAIRS AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD.

F/V “ALASKA MIST” UP FOR REPAIRS AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD.

 

 

STERN OF "ALASKA MIST" WITH HER TAIL SHAFT PULLLED AT NORTHLAKE.

STERN OF “ALASKA MIST” WITH HER TAIL SHAFT PULLLED AT NORTHLAKE.

 

 

"SPIRIT OF GLACIER BAY" UP AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD.

“SPIRIT OF GLACIER BAY” UP AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD.

 

 

WE JUST HAPPENED TO BE AT CAP-SANTE WHEN THE            CAME OUT OF THE BOAT HAVEN TO DO BATTLE WITH A TOPSAIL SCHOONER.

WE JUST HAPPENED TO BE AT CAP SANTE WHEN THE “LADY WASHINGTON” CAME OUT OF THE BOAT HAVEN TO DO BATTLE WITH A TOPSAIL SCHOONER.

 

 

JACK RUSSELS STERN WHEELER CHARTER VESSEL "CHRISTINE W".

JACK RUSSELS STERN WHEELER CHARTER VESSEL “CHRISTINE W”.

 

 

CLIFF CENTER'S ST THE "RELIABLE" SHE IS THE LOGO BOAT FOR OLYMPIA TUG RACES THIS YEAR.

CLIFF CENTER’S ST THE “RELIABLE”. SHE IS THE LOGO BOAT FOR OLYMPIA TUG RACES THIS YEAR.

 

 

CROWLEYS "PROTECTOR" UP IN THE FOSS DRYDOCK.

CROWLEYS “PROTECTOR” UP IN THE FOSS DRYDOCK.

 

RIC'S NEW TUG AND IT WILL BE A DANDY WHENTHEY ARE DONE WITH IT. IT CAME OUT OF THE FAR NORTH I HEAR.

RIC’S NEW TUG AND IT WILL BE A DANDY WHEN THEY ARE DONE WITH IT. IT CAME OUT OF THE FAR NORTH I HEAR.

 

 OUR MAN & WOMAN, BOB & DONNA RICHARDSON, IN COOS BAY ARE GETTING A LITTLE PLAY TIME AND HE TRADED IN HIS GAS PICK UP FOR A USED DIESEL AND REPORTS THAT IT GETS GOOD MILEAGE.  BOB SAYS THAT THEY HAVE BEEN DREDGING IN COOS BAY. THOSE HARBORS WITH RIVERS RUNNING INTO THEM ARE ALWAYS SHALLOWING UP.

 

COOS BAY WILL MAKE A CHRISTIAN OUT OF YOU- DO WE HAVE TO GO OUT?.

COOS BAY WILL MAKE A CHRISTIAN OUT OF YOU- DO WE HAVE TO GO OUT?

 

GEORGES WALES PILOT YOU HAVE TO BE NIMBLE TO BE A PILOT.

GEORGES WALES, PILOT. YOU HAVE TO BE NIMBLE TO BE A PILOT.

 

 

HENRY SAUSE OUT BOUND WITH A LITE OIL BARGE.

“HENRY SAUSE” OUT BOUND WITH A LITE OIL BARGE.

 

 

HENRY SAUSE JUST PAST BOB;S HOUSE WITH ITS FUEL BARGE.

“HENRY SAUSE” JUST PAST BOB’S HOUSE WITH ITS FUEL BARGE.

 

DUNLAPS MANFRED NYSTROM OUT BOUND.

DUNLAPS “MANFRED NYSTROM” OUT BOUND.

 

 

NOW THAT'S A BIG DUSTY.

NOW THAT’S A BIG DUSTY

 

 

Thanks to all of you who send in pictures and facts so that I can share the information one photo at a time.    Anything that you send me, I can scan and send back to you good as new.

WANTED:

  1. Crowley decals and cloth patches for jackets of caps. The one I really like says “Red Stack Tugs”.

  2. Old Cary-Davis & Puget Sound Tug & Barge Photos & advertisements.

  3. Old cannery tender & log towing photos.

  4. We buy old tug and waterfront photos or collections and snapshots, as well as old (pre 1946) Marine Digest Magazines in any condition.

  5. Information wanted: in an article in the Yachting magazine, it stated that Doc Freeman bought a tug named LEWIS II in 1943. He got her from Bellingham Tug & Barge and I can’t seem to track her down, any ideas?.

  6. Want builders plate off the Coast Guard Cutter BONHAM. I gave it to Jim Valentyne after dad bought the BONHAM.

  7. Tatoosh Towing & Salvage, Fremont Boat Co. Fremont Tugboat Co. and the three cats; Braveheart, Razz

All the best from: Mark & Margie Freeman, Captains Erik & Tom, Miss Blue, Richie, The Mark Freeman Maritime Museum,Tatoosh Towing & Salvage, Fremont Boat Co. Fremont Tugboat Co. and the three cats; Braveheart, Razz and Batman (all three cats came from a no-kill shelter about 4 years ago,). Please donate to the Northwest Seaport to help repair the ARTHUR FOSS you saw the pictures of the CHICKAMAUGA being dismantled in Port Townsend we sure don’t want that to happen the ARTHUR FOSS.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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MARK FREEMAN’S “RUDDERLESS” JULY 13, 2014

 

CAPTAIN MARK.
CAPTAIN MARK.

 

OUR LOGO THANKS TO JOHNNY ADAMS WHO DREW IT AND BILL GARDEN GAVE ME PERMISSION TO USE IT AS HE DID FOR MANY YEARS.

OUR LOGO THANKS TO JOHNNY ADAMS WHO DREW IT AND TO BILL GARDEN WHO GAVE ME PERMISSION TO USE IT.

WE WERE JUST NOTIFIED THAT OUR OLD TIME FRIEND AND INSURANCE MAN, TOM MEDENDORP, PASSED AWAY. HE WAS DOING WHAT HE LIKED BEST: RIDING HIS BIG HARLEY IN IDAHO WITH HIS FRIENDS WHEN HE SUFFERED AN APPARANT HEART ATTACK – BUT WE HAVEN’T GOT ALL THE INFORMATION YET, WHICH WE WILL SHARE LATER. GOODBYE TOM, WE WILL ALL MISS YOU GREATLY.

-1

 

MARK & DOC FREEMAN

MARK & DOC FREEMAN

 

 

 

My dad, “Doc”, bought and sold boats and everything else. He owned a great number of tugs – some he used in his business, others he bought and sold, some he sold on consignment. He bought and sold well over a thousand regular boats including several sailing ships, freighters, yachts, tugs, ferry boats and thousands of surplus vessels, landing barges, motor launches, skiffs dorys, yard oilers, freighters, deck barges, Coast Guard Cutters – if it floated Doc had something to do with it. Doc had a partner Russ Gibson that’s where the name Freeman & Gibson came from. Dad even named his famous marine hardware store Freeman & Gibson. I think that they were partners from the end of the 1930s until about 1950 when the partnership was dissolved and the store became “Doc Freeman’s”.

Dad also invested funds from his old time employees and made them share holders in the various properties that he bought. Dad also had the Alaska Junk Co. as a partner in a lot of the big boat purchases. The government would at times have bids on three big freighters opening on the same day and you had to have a bid in on all them so it took a lot of ready cash to play that game. I also owned several tugs and barges and there is a story and pictures about all of them. My brother-in-law, Pat Stoppelman, and my sister, Merry, were in the tugboat business and they had at least 25 different tugs so my work is cut out for me - as if I didn’t have enough to do.

I thought that I should start putting them down in print since I turned 80 in March. I have kept all the files that I could lay my hands on. It takes six large deep file drawers that contain dad and Pat & Merry’s and my info on our boats.  Dad died in January, 1963 when he just turned 60. Any new info that you have, please pass it on to me. Some boats we have just a photo, others are mentioned in trade journals – and we don’t have hardly any files before WW II  and almost no photos during the war except for the trade journals. Silver was used in the war effort and you could not buy any film. Lucky that Joe Williamson and Ray Krantz, both famous marine photographers and friends of mine, took photos throughout the war and I have a lot of their photos.

This is the almost the last of dads tugs and workboats While this is not all of them but as many as I could find and remember so as others appear I will put them in the blog.

 STEAM TUG ROSALIE.

 

 

Tug Rosalie: Official #: 233544;  St.s.;  Registered length: 38.2 feet; over all length: 42 feet; beam: 11.7 and depth of hold is 4.6 feet. 12 gross tons & 5 net tons, built in 1898 at San Francisco with 80 horsepower steam. She was built as a dispatch boat for Alaska Commercial Company at St. Michael, Akaska.

American Tugboat Company in Everett bought her in 1905 and she was always a good boat for them, they referred to her as the Pup.

I think American laid her up and my dad bought her from them and had her for sale. There is some confusion in McCurdy’s History. It says American sold her to South America and put her on a ship to deliever her to Ecuador. Dad told me that he and Grandpa Fitz, who had an unlimited Steam engineers’ license ( any ocean any tonnage he could have been chief engineer on the QUEEN MARY), used to do a lot of shifting with her. Now if American still owned her and put her with Doc for sale, well you don’t use other peoples’ boats for your work, dad was very straight-laced about any business transaction and he did not use boats that were for sale for his own purpose.

One of the photos shows her laying at Fremont Boat and I think dad sold her to South America but there is no way to know the details for sure. Anyway, she was sold and left the country on a Grace Lines Ship and the Merchant Vessels of the United States shows her going out of the book in 1936. She was always one of dad’s favorites and just from that alone I think American sold her to him. Just before he died The Puget Sound Maritime Historical Society made him an honorary member and had a very nice presentation vellum with a ink drawing of his pilot house and the ROSALIE charging along – it is included in the photos of the ROSALIE.

 

A 1925 MARINE DIGEST STORY FEATURING THE "ROSALIE"

A 1925 MARINE DIGEST STORY FEATURING THE “ROSALIE”

 

"ROSALIE"

“ROSALIE”

 

 

"ROSALIE"

“ROSALIE”

 

"ROSALIE"

“ROSALIE”

 

 

"ROSALIE" AT FREMONT BOAT CO. IN 1936.

“ROSALIE” AT FREMONT BOAT CO. IN 1936.

 

DAD WAS MADE AN HONARY MEMBER AND GIVEN THIS CERTIFICATE FROM THE PUGET SOUND MARITIME HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

DAD WAS MADE AN HONORARY MEMBER AND GIVEN THIS CERTIFICATE FROM THE PUGET SOUND MARITIME HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

 

 LAUNCH SAND DAB II.

 

Launch: SAND DAB II: Ga.s;  Official number: 258333; registered length 35.7; overall 36 feet; beam 10.3 feet; depth of hold 4.8 feet.  12 gross tons, 10 net tons. Built at Dundalk, Maryland, by the Owens Yacht Company as LCVP C-79941 a landing barge. Bill Garden drew up the plans and we built a half round bow which looked pretty good on a square nose landing barge. Bill and dad were good friends from the 1930s and Bill did a lot of design work for us.

This was another famous ‘Millers Bay Special’ but it was really neat because it had a head, bunks, a stove, a sink  and even an automatic pilot. She only drew about 31/2 feet for good old shallow Millers Bay. When we got the hull surplus it had a 6-71 GM Diesel and that was way too valuable to have, so dad sold that engine and put a 175 horsepower Continental Commando Gas engine in her. They were like a Hall Scott – great sounding heavy-duty gas engine with lots of kick and of course, it was surplus too.

Jack and I had to run over to Kingston to bring a part to the fellow that had my tug the JERKMORE  chartered and as I was making the landing, the current caught me and I broke out all the windows in the pilot house. I misjudged the landing and there were these 12 x 12 timbers sticking out from the edge of the dock and when I knew that I was going to hit them I centered them up so they took out the windows and not the house. After the crash Jack looked at me and said ‘well you sure screwed up that landing’ and laughed! That’s sure how you learn. We didn’t have her very long, she was way too neat and dad sold her but that’s one of the things that we did for a living was build up boats and then sell them. Dad, of course, had a ship yard running in the 1930s and knew all about building boats and Jack McCrary had Frank & McCrary, a boat building firm, so everyone knew how to build boats.

 

 

"SAND DAB II" AT OUR MILLERS BAY DOCK.

“SAND DAB II” AT OUR MILLERS BAY DOCK.     1949

 

APRIL 1950 AD ON "SAND DAB II" IN MARINE DIGEST.

APRIL 1950 AD ON “SAND DAB II” IN MARINE DIGEST.

 

 LAUNCH SAND DAB IV.

 

Launch: SAND DAB IV: Official number: 266088;  length 32.8 feet; beam 9.8 feet; depth of hold 4.8 feet; 10 tons gross, 9 net tons, built as a Plane Rearming Barge in 1942 at Fairhaven, NY.  Power 141 horsepower.

Dad bought her surplus as he needed another ‘Millers Bay Special’ so Bill Garden drew the plans up and dad had the hull out of water next door at Lee’s Marine Way’s and Jack McCrary started to work on her. Later, when she would floatm we moved her into our boat  shed. Dad & Mother made several trips to Millers Bay in her and he had an outing towing a landing barge that he just sold to Tacoma with friends combining a little business with pleasure. Jack put on beautiful iron bark guards with Alaska Cedar plugs and then he varnished the guards. She was another neat boat with all the amenities like a head and bunks etc. Dad went upstairs and got a Chrysler Royal gas engine for her. Dad sold her in December of 1955 when I was in the Coast Guard so I never got to meet the new owners.

 

 

"SAND DAB IV" BEING REBUILT BY JACK McCRARY IT WAS A 33 FOOT PLANE REARMING BARGE. AT LESS MARINE WAYS NEXT DOOR.

“SAND DAB IV” BEING REBUILT BY JACK McCRARY AT LEE’S MARINE WAYS NEXT DOOR. SHE ORIGINALLY WAS A 33 FOOT PLANE REARMING BARGE.

 

JACK HAS THE CABIN FRAMED UP.

JACK HAS THE CABIN FRAMED UP.

 

"SAND DAB IV" AT MILLERS BAY SAND SPIT. FROM LEFT PAUL YITTERDAHL, HELEN GRIFFIN, MOTHER MAY, KATE, AND DAD DOC. NOTHING LIKE A SHALLOW BOAT.

“SAND DAB IV” AT MILLERS BAY SAND SPIT. FROM LEFT PAUL YITTERDAHL, HELEN GRIFFIN, MAY FREEMAN, KATE AND DOC FREEMAN. NOTHING LIKE A SHALLOW BOAT.

 

 

"SAND DAB IV " ON SETH GREENS DRYDOCK. WE SOLD HER IN 1956.

“SAND DAB IV ” ON SETH GREENS DRYDOCK. WE SOLD HER IN 1956.

 

 

 SEA MULE TUGS AND M&T UNITS.

 

 

Surplus SEA MULE TUGS were all steel construction, length 40 feet; beam 12 feet; draft 3 1/2 feet; power two Chrysler Royal straight 8 gas engines with 9 to 1 reduction gears and they swung a 48 inch diameter with 46 inches of pitch and they really pulled. Dad and Russ bought six in one sale and three in another sale.

Another surplus unit that they bought was the Murray & Tregurtha portable propulsion unit. This was like a giant outboard with the same 141 horsepower Chrysler Royal and a 9 to 1 reduction gear swinging the 48 inch x 46 inch iron prop. You could bolt or weld the unit to the back end of a barge and you would not need a tug and you could have more than one unit on the barge. You could raise and lower the prop depending on how deep or shallow the water was. They were very similar to the ASD props on the tractor tugs today but very crude by modern standards. They were really handy as you had thrust in any direction that you wanted.

There was a single engine model of the Sea Mule with one Chrysler. Dad & Russ must have bought 100 of them surplus at Fort Lewis and every afternoon Associated Transfer would show up with two of them on a lowboy and we would strip them of the engine and all the boat gear - steering wheels or anything that we could put into our marine store and sell. We had an A-frame truck which took care of the heavy stuff but it was a real pain because it was summer and hot and sticky and at two units a day it went on forever. We had to strip the units in a hurry and send the truck to the steel mill the same afternoon or incur more charges. So far, I cannot turn a photo of the single Sea Mule Units but they are around somewhere. U.S. PLYWOOD mill, where Peter Strong’s Coastal Transportation is now, had one that they used for a boom boat but I can’t remember how they made it float by itself. It was called the SEA HAG and Bill Miller used to be the boom man there. I heard that he pulled a 3 to 1 Jimmy with his Royal on a 9 to 1. Big slow turning props sure pull a lot.

 

 

FREEMAN & GIBSON BOUGHT 9 OF THESE UNITS THAT WERE SURPLUS IN 1949. THEY HAD TWO CHRYSLER ROYAL GAS ENGINES WITH 9 TO 1 REDUCTION GEARS WHICH SWUNG A 48 INCH DIAMETER PROP WITH 46 INCHES OF PITCH. YOU TALK ABOUT A VERSATILE ENGINE AND REDUCTION GEAR PACKAGE. THE GIANT OUTBOARD HAD ONE 9 TO 1 ROYAL WE CALLED THEM MURRAY & TREGURTHAS AFTER THE BUILDERS.

FREEMAN & GIBSON BOUGHT 9 OF THESE UNITS THAT WERE SURPLUS IN 1949. THEY HAD TWO CHRYSLER ROYAL GAS ENGINES WITH 9 TO 1 REDUCTION GEARS WHICH SWUNG A 48 INCH DIAMETER PROP WITH 46 INCHES OF PITCH. YOU TALK ABOUT A VERSATILE ENGINE AND REDUCTION GEAR PACKAGE. THE GIANT OUTBOARD HAD ONE 9 TO 1 ROYAL WE CALLED THEM MURRAY & TREGURTHAS AFTER THE BUILDERS.

 

RECEIPT FREOM UNITED STATES MARITIME COMMISSION FOR SEA MULES.

RECEIPT FROM UNITED STATES MARITIME COMMISSION FOR SEA MULES.

 

SPECS ON SEA MULE TUGS.

SPECS ON SEA MULE TUGS.

 

 

ADE YOLUNGSMAN CONVERTED A SEA MULE INTO A LOG PATROL TUG. IN THE SAME PHOTO IS ONE OF OUR PUSHER TUGS.

AD YOUNGSMAN CONVERTED A SEA MULE INTO A LOG PATROL TUG. IN THE SAME PHOTO IS ONE OF OUR PUSHER TUGS THAT HE BOUGHT FROM US.

 

 

 TUG “SERVICE”

Tug SERVICE: Official number 215162; Ol.s; length 47.7; beam 10.4 feet. Depth of hold 5 feet.  20 gross tons; 13 net ton; power 75 horsepower Atlas – her second engine, I think. Built in 1917 as the B & A NO. 3 in Seattle, she had a 75 horsepower steam engine.  The owners in 1936 thru 1951 were Pioneer Transport (aka Pioneer Sand & Gravel) and in 1953-54 the book shows the owner as Ray Rider. I would guess around 1952 dad bought and sold her as I remember her tied to the end of dock 6 at Fremont Boat Company but I have no records of her. She towed gravel barges out of the pit in south sound to the south end of Lake Union and into the Duwamish river.

 

 

 

"SERVICE RUNNNING LITE.

“SERVICE” RUNNNING LITE.

 

 

B & A NO. 3 I JUST RECEIVED THIS PHOTO FROM SKIP LAMPMAN ALONG WITH SEVERAL OTHERS THANKS SKIP.

B & A NO. 3  TUG  “SERVICE’s”  FIRST NAME . I JUST RECEIVED THIS PHOTO FROM SKIP LAMPMAN ALONG WITH SEVERAL OTHERS.  THANKS SKIP!

 

 

 TUG SKOOKUM.

 

 

Tug  SKOOKUM.  Official number 225979; Ol.s;  length 47.3 feet; beam 12.8; depth of hold 5.9 feet;  19.6 gross tons; 13 net tons.

She was built in Olympia by Henry Long’s Shipyard in 1926 and the design work was done by L. H. Coolidge. She was built for James Draham to tow logs out of the boom grounds in Mud Bay at the head of Eld Inlet. Her power was a 65 horsepower Atlas which swings a 46 inch diameter and a 30 inch pitch at 325 rpm and she pulled 3,400 lbs on the scale. Mr. Draham also had the tug ISKUM and he listed both boats for sale with Doc Freeman at Fremont Boat Co.  He cautioned my dad to only show the two tugs at high tide as they would both be floating typical shallow water boom grounds. Dad wrote to Mr. McClintoc at Oregon Shipbuilding and he quoted the SKOOKUM for $9,000.00 and the ISKUM for $5,000.00. He ended up selling the SKOOKUM to them and delivered her to Portland. He covered over the windows with plywood but how he got her there I am not sure. I think that he had someone run her down the coast because he gave James Draham a bill for fuel and insurance and repairs and it said nothing about towing. Some of the invoices are dated May 20, 1942 so the trip was somewhere around then. I was too young to go along but I thought about it! I was 8 years old but my compass was pointing in the right direction already. I didn’t get to go down the coast till 1949 when we brought the FEATHER up the coast from Portland. At least I got my picture taken on the SKOOKUM.

 

 

PLANS FOR THE "SKOOKUM" FROM 1922 PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

PLANS FOR THE “SKOOKUM” FROM 1922 PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

 

A PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE AD FOR ATLAS IMPERIAL DIESELS IN THE "SKOOKUM & ISKUM"

A PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE AD FOR ATLAS IMPERIAL DIESELS IN THE “SKOOKUM & ISKUM”

 

"SKOOKUM" RINNING LITE. HAS TO BE A JOE WILLIAMSON OR RAY KRANTZ PHOTO?

“SKOOKUM” RUNNING LITE. HAS TO BE A JOE WILLIAMSON OR RAY KRANTZ PHOTO?

 

A YOUNG MARK SITTING ON THE TOW BITT OF THE "SKOOKUM" I ALWAYS KNEW WHERE MY COMPASS WAS POINTING. OUR HOME IN THE BACKGROUND THE FERRY "AIRLINE".

A YOUNG MARK SITTING ON THE TOW BITT OF THE “SKOOKUM”. I ALWAYS KNEW WHERE MY COMPASS WAS POINTING. OUR HOME IN THE BACKGROUND IS THE FERRY “AIRLINE”.

 

"SKOOKUM" READY FOR A TRIP DOWN THE COAST WINDOWS WITH SHEETS OF PLYWOOD OVER THEM FORWARD HATCH DOGGED DOWN. YOUNG MARK READY TO GO.  1942

“SKOOKUM” READY FOR A TRIP DOWN THE COAST. WINDOWS WITH SHEETS OF PLYWOOD OVER THEM, FORWARD HATCH DOGGED DOWN. YOUNG MARK READY TO GO. 1942

 

LETTER TO JAMES DRAHAM ON JAN. 19TH 1942.

LETTER TO JAMES DRAHAM ON JAN. 19TH 1942.

 

LETTER FROM DAD TO JAMES DRAHAM OWNER OF THE "SKOOKUM & ISKUM" MAY 4, 1942

LETTER FROM DAD TO JAMES DRAHAM OWNER OF THE “SKOOKUM & ISKUM” MAY 4, 1942

 

LETTER TO OREGON SHIPBUILDING CORP. MAY 4 1942 FROM DAD.

LETTER TO OREGON SHIPBUILDING CORP. MAY 4, 1942 FROM DAD.

 

REST OF LETTER TO OREGON SHIPBUILDING.

REST OF LETTER TO OREGON SHIPBUILDING

 

LETTER FROM DAD TO OREGON SHIPBUILDING ABOUT DELIVERY OF THE TUG "SKOOKUM.  MAY 29 1942'

LETTER FROM DAD TO OREGON SHIPBUILDING ABOUT DELIVERY OF THE TUG “SKOOKUM”. MAY 29 1942.

 

PURCHASE ORDER FOR THE "SKOOKUM" LOOK  AT THE COST OF FUEL AND MEN TO TAKE THE TUG TO PORTLAND.

PURCHASE ORDER FOR THE “SKOOKUM” LOOK AT THE COST OF FUEL AND MEN TO TAKE THE TUG TO PORTLAND.

 

FINAL LETTER ON SALE OF THE 2 TUGS ON JUNE 26, 1942.

FINAL LETTER ON SALE OF THE TWO TUGS ON JUNE 26, 1942.

 

 

 TUG STIMPSON.

 

 

Tug STIMPSON. Official number: 212265. Oi.s; length 49.1 feet; beam 14.4 feet; depth of hold 5.3 feet; 27 gross tons; 18 net tons. Built in Seattle in 1914 to tow logs to the Stimpson Mill in Ballard. Her second or third engine was a 110 horsepower Atlas 4-cylinder. I have no records other than one photo of her tied up in front of our house barge and a good memory of my sister, Merry, and I in her engine room. Dad said we had to wash down the engine room. He said “soogie”, and I knew just what he meant. Soogie is made up of hot water and a mixture of centanouz (TSP) which is very caustic and when mixed with hot water it takes off dirt, grease and skin – lots of skin. She had an exhaust leak in the engine room and it was the worst one I have ever seen; it seems like we scrubbed for days and never did find any white paint.

 A funny story or should we start it like: “now this is no crap”. That’s how real sea stories start, you know.

The STIMPSON had a 110 horsepower Atlas and the fellows that we sold her to were very proud of her and they said that she would really pull and they were noisy about it. At that time my brother-in-law ,Pat Stoppelman, had the tug WESTERN STAR and he had just re-powered her. He took out a 100 horsepower CO Fairbanks that was totally worn out - it was one of those famous Fairbanks that we talk about when we refer to them as base firing, back-lashing, cinder-throwing, snooze-chewing, Punk starting, air gobbling son of a bitch – that being our most polite description.

Pat replaced the CO with a 6-71 GM with a 4 3/8 to 1 reduction gear which normally swings a 50 inch diameter and 30 inches of pitch three-blade propeller. Now the way you fit wheels to log boats is at the dock you have to get the maximum number of rpm. That means you should be able to turn 1900 at the dock and not overheat. That way towing a raft at 1 ½ miles an hour, you have just a little wiggle room for loads on the engine. A Jimmy (slang for GM) will produce 165 horsepower at 1800 with 60 mm injectors. The landing barges had a battle setting on the governor and with 90 mm injectors they would produce 225 horsepower. The guys that owned the STIMPSON, I think their name was Tellefson, were really giving Pat a bad time like that old Jimmy won’t pull anything, it just makes a lot of noise and it sure would not pull our Atlas which is a real engine. Pat said “enough, we are going to show you just what a Jimmy has.”

The STIMPSON noses  into the end of the dock at Fremont Boat, puts her in gear and ties a ½” line to the dock and tells Pat any time you want to hook up we are ready and you will never break this line you won’t even make it come tight. Pat backs in to them, hands them the end of the stick pennant and goes out about 150 feet and tightens up on the line and starts to wind her up. The guys on the STIMPSON are going full ahead with their foot on the wedges, lots of smoke and they listen to that Jimmy wind up. It steadily gets a higher pitch  and all of a sudden they fly off the dock; the small line tightens up and breaks and their stern is going under water and they are hollering for Pat to “Stop! You are sinking us.” Some guys never get it. They just talk too much; or, is the right word boast. I can’t tell you how many lessons Jimmys have given. Vic Franks shipyard installed their first Jimmy and they came over to get my dad because they thought it was running away dad said “No, everything is normal, they just whine a little and do they ever pull.”

"STIMPSON" LOG TOWER.
“STIMPSON” LOG TOWER.

 

 

"STIMPSON" AT FREMONT BOAT CO.

“STIMPSON” AT FREMONT BOAT CO.

 

"WESTERN STAR" MY SISTER MERRY AND BOB SHREWSBURY.

“WESTERN STAR” MY SISTER MERRY AND BOB SHREWSBURY.

 

 

 DIVING TENDER “S.H. FINCH”

 

Diving tender/tug S. H. FINCH. Official number: 224278; Ol.s; registered length 58.6;  beam

18.5 feet; depth of hold 8.2 feet; 58 gross ton;, 40 net tons. Built in 1924 at Seattle by Crosby

Marine Corporation for use by Henry Finch, diver. Her power was a 65 horsepower Mianus

Diesel. Later in her life she got two 6-71 GM 165 horsepower diesel engines. Doc and Manny

Berman of Alaska Junk Company bought her at a U.S. MARSHALLS sale and sold her to Pan Pacific Salvage Corp for work in Alaska on July 22, 1955.

 

"S. H. FINCH PLANS FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BT MAGAZINE.

“S. H. FINCH PLANS FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

 

 

"S. H. FINCH" STORY FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

“S. H. FINCH” STORY FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

 

"S. H. FINCH UNDERWAY IN LAKE UNION.

“S. H. FINCH” UNDERWAY IN LAKE UNION.

 

 "S. H. FINCH"LAYING AT DOCK IN WEST WATERWAY SPOKANE STREET BRIDGE IN BACKGROUND.


“S. H. FINCH” LAYING AT THE DOCK IN WEST WATERWAY, SPOKANE STREET BRIDGE IN BACKGROUND.

 

 

 TUG “STOKER”

 

 

Tug STOKER. Doc Freeman purchased surplus from the U. S. NAVY at Bremerton, Washington. Length 30 feet; beam 10 feet; draft 4 feet; semi tunnel. Built during World War II by Grandy Boat Company on Lake Union for the U. S. ARMY, they built three of them. Power was 105 horsepower Navy Buda model DD. We started her up and started using her shortly after we brought her home. After dad died in 1963, mother sold the tug to me but that’s another story.

 

 

"STOKER" NEW SURPLUS.

“STOKER” NEW SURPLUS.

 

"OSCAR" ONE OF THREE THAT GRANDY BOAT CO. ON LAKE UNION BUILT FOR U.S.ARMY DURING WORLD WAR II.

“OSCAR” ONE OF THREE THAT GRANDY BOAT CO. ON LAKE UNION BUILT FOR U.S.ARMY DURING WORLD WAR II.

 

 

 STEAM WHALER “UNIMAK”

 

 

Steam Whaler  UNIMAK.  Official number: 209710. St.s; registered length 100 feet; beam 19.2 feet; depth of hold 12.4 feet; 148 gross tons; 101 net tons; 350 horsepower.

Built in 1912 for American Pacific Whaling Company. Freeman & Gibson were high bidders on YAG 33 and was physically delievered by the United States Maritime Commission on September 10, 1946 and we towed her home to the end of the dock at Fremont Boat Company and put her up for sale. But, no takers. Of course she was steam and it took a big crew to run her and steam boats burn lots of oil to make steam. She would not sell no matter what dad did to advertise her. He even gave it serious thought to make a big tug out of her and install something like a 300 horsepower Atlas or a big Fairbanks but that did not pencil out the way he wanted it. So he said “we will cut her up for scrap.” We started in on her tearing out all the wood in her – all the steel had wood paneling over it – and there was just tons of wood. We removed as much as possible and we were trying to figure out how to get the rest of it out when Dad came up with this really bright idea: we would burn the wood out of her. But we could not do that while tied to Fremont Boat Company docks. The plan was made that Jack and I would tow her out into Lake Washington with the MIZPAH and get her out of King County and throw some diesel on her and throw a flare into her and watch her burn……

Dad even wrote up this big story about burning her and published it in the Marine Digest and I think both papers had it so that everyone in authority would know what we were doing; well, almost everyone got the word. All except for Tony who ran the Harbor Police boat No. 1. but more on that later.

Jack McCrary and I fired up the MIZPAH and went alongside the UNIMAK and soak her down good with diesel and rigged a wire off the bow of her so we could shackle into her and just keep up wind of her and let her burn. We charge out into Lake Washington at 4 knots and take a couple of bearings and determine that we are out of King County and are in someone else’s territory. I asked “now Jack”? and he said “I think so, Mark” so I lite a flare and chucked it into her and soon we had a real bonfire going and lots of smoke, it burned for several hours and not a soul shows up. The fire finally goes out and we make up to it and tow her back to Fremont Boat. On the way back we are in Union Bay and Tony and Patrol 1 passes us at full speed. Jack comments as he goes by that maybe we will see him later. We tie her up at Fremont Boat soak her down with our fire hose and we are just getting ready to shift the tug when Patrol No. 1 shows up and Tony hollers at us “were you on fire?”  “Yes, we were - didn’t you get the word?”-  “what word?” he pipes up. Well we didn’t get a ticket but we did get a dirty look and a don’t pull that one again. I didn’t see where we did anything wrong. Of course today they would just throw the key away and you would never see the light of day ever again……… did I ever tell you the one about burning landing barges? Well that’s another story. Before we burned her we took the pilot house off her and put it on this big scow and unloaded it on Treasure Island for Russ Gibson in Port Madison.

"UNIMAK" AS A STEAM WHALER CHASER BOAT WITH GUN ON THE BOW UNDER THE CANVAS. PHOTO BY HARRY KIRWIN FROM THIS WAS SEAFARING
“UNIMAK” AS A STEAM WHALER CHASER BOAT WITH GUN ON THE BOW UNDER THE CANVAS. PHOTO BY HARRY KIRWIN FROM THIS WAS SEAFARING

 

"UNIMAK" IN WAR TIME COLORS.

“UNIMAK” IN WAR TIME COLORS.

 

 

NOTICE ABOUT BURNING "UNIMAK"

NOTICE ABOUT BURNING “UNIMAK”

 

PILOT HOUSE OFF "UNIMAK" THAT JACK AND I ROLLED ASHORE ON TREASURE ISLAND IN PORT MADISON.

PILOT HOUSE OFF “UNIMAK” THAT JACK AND I ROLLED ASHORE ON TREASURE ISLAND IN PORT MADISON.

 

 

 TUG “Wm. CRAWFORD”

 

Tug Wm CRAWFORD. Official number: 214014. Registered length 43 feet; overall length 47 feet; beam 12.8 feet; depth of hold 4.3 feet; 15 gross tons; 10 net tons.

Built at Seattle in 1916, designed by Lee & Brinton and built by John Wilson. She was built for Merrill & Ring the huge logging company for their boom ground on the Pysht River in the Straits of Juan De Fuca where she made up log rafts for towing by the big tugs. It is very shallow in the river so they made her twin screw and she only drew 3 ½ feet of water. Her original power was a pair of 35 horsepower Atlas gas engines but later in her life she had a pair of 100 horsepower Hall Scott gas engines; and, eventually, she had a pair of 6-71 165 horsepower Jimmys. Doc bought her in 1942 and tried to sell her, but no takers; so he rebuilt her and reengined her and put her to work as a P (percentage) boat for Cary Davis (the forerunner of Puget Sound Tug & Barge). He sold an interest in her to Phil Bishop who I met in the Islands during the early 1950s. She of course was a wreck when he bought her as you can tell by the photos, that’s how most of our old tugs started when we got them. Read the letter of November 24, 1942 they hit something with the prop over at  Drummond Literage in the West Waterway and the shaft and wheel were hanging out the stern of the boat; they got a line around it but it still slipped out of the boat and Ed Messerly took his shirt off and cramed it into the stuffing box and saved the boat from sinking as they went to the drydock. Oh, for a life at sea! Dad eventually sold her to Brown and Anderson who were running tugs out of Port Townsend, they had other boats as well and some beachcomb boats named the NEW SHOE & the OLD SHOE. Other owners that I knew about: Cotton Construction of Port Townsend renamed her the COTTON NO.6 and changed the house and I think that they put the Jimmys in her. Larry Jay also towed with her and Lee and Gladys Schoeben made a crusing tug out of her and we even cruised with them. The last fellow that had her and I don’t know his name put in a couple of 25-40 horsepower Model DA Buda diesels which were somewhere in the area of the original power - in fact the Atlas gas engines probably had more power. The last place that I saw her was in Gig Harbor. She also had a sister tug the “Wm Burnett”.

 

PLANS FOR Wm. CRAFORD FROM JUNE 1916 PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

PLANS FOR Wm. CRAFORD FROM JUNE 1916 PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

 

LETTER FROM DOC ON FWB. 2 1942 ABOUT "CRAWFORD" FOR SALE

LETTER FROM DOC ON FEB. 2, 1942 ABOUT “CRAWFORD” FOR SALE

 

Wm. CRAWFORD LAYING ON DOCK 1 AT FREMONT BOAT CO. IN 1942

“Wm. CRAWFORD” LAYING ON DOCK 1 AT FREMONT BOAT CO. IN 1942

 

"Wm. CRAWFORD" ON DOCK 1.

“Wm. CRAWFORD” ON DOCK 1.

 

LETTER ON "CRAWFORD" AFTER REPOWERING DEC.3 1942.

LETTER ON “CRAWFORD” AFTER REPOWERING DEC. 3, 1942.

 

"Wm CRAWFORD" UNDER WAY WITHJ NEW ENGINES.

“Wm CRAWFORD” UNDER WAY WITH NEW ENGINES.

 

SHE LOOKS LIKE SHE WAS PAINTED WAR TIME GRAY.

SHE LOOKS LIKE SHE WAS PAINTED WAR TIME GRAY.

 

 

ACCIDENT REPORT.

ACCIDENT REPORT.

 

 

COTTON CONSTRUCTION OF PORT TOWNSEND OWNED HER HER AND CHANGED THE HOUSE AND SHE HAD 2 671 GMS IN THIS PHOTO. I THINK STAN WILLHIGHT TOOK THIS PICTURE.

COTTON CONSTRUCTION OF PORT TOWNSEND OWNED  HER AND CHANGED THE HOUSE. SHE HAD TWO 6-71 GMs IN THIS PHOTO. I THINK STAN WILLHIGHT TOOK THIS PICTURE.

 

 Here are a group of local photos of our activities.

 

TOM & RICHIE WORING ON THE BOW BULWARKS ON THE "BLUEBERRY"

TOM & RICHIE WORKING ON THE BOW BULWARKS ON THE “BLUEBERRY”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CPT.TOM FITTING BULWARKS ON THE "BLUEBERRY".

CPT. TOM FITTING BULWARKS ON THE “BLUEBERRY”. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 "ON-TIME" GETTING HER PICTURE TAKEN


“ON-TIME” GETTING HER PICTURE TAKEN. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

"CHELSEA K" ENROUTE TO PIER 90 IN TOW BY "GRACE & DIXIE" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“CHELSEA K” ENROUTE TO PIER 90 IN TOW BY “GRACE & DIXIE”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

'CHELSEA K" WITH "DIXIE" ALONGSIDE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

‘CHELSEA K” WITH “DIXIE” ALONGSIDE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"CHELSEA K" AT PIER 90. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“CHELSEA K” AT PIER 90. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE" ALONGSIDE "CHELSEA K". ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” ALONGSIDE “CHELSEA K”. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

MORE LOCAL PHOTOS.

 

 

"JEEP & HALFTRACK" TOEING "WYRILL" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“JEEP & HALFTRACK” TOWING “WYRILL”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

MORE "WYRILL" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

MORE  OF THE “WYRILL”.   ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CROWLEY TUG "MERCURY" FIRST OF THE TWIN SCREW SUPER BOATS. COUSIN AL HERMAN WAS CHIEF ENGINEER ON HER AND WORKED FOR TOM FOR YEARS. HE LIKED THE TUG SO MUS=CH THAT HE BUILT A MODEL OF HER UNFORTUNATLY HE DIED BEFORE THE MODEL WAS DONE. I INHERITED THE MODEL FRO HIS LIFE BELLE AND I AM PUTTING BACK TOGETHER. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

CROWLEY TUG “MERCURY” FIRST OF THE TWIN SCREW SUPER BOATS. COUSIN AL HERMAN WAS CHIEF ENGINEER ON HER AND WORKED FOR TOM FOR YEARS. HE LIKED THE TUG SO MUCH THAT HE BUILT A MODEL OF HER. UNFORTUNATLY HE DIED BEFORE THE MODEL WAS DONE. I INHERITED THE MODEL FROM HIS WIFE, BELLE, AND I AM PUTTING IT BACK TOGETHER. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"MERCURY" STERN VIEW.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“MERCURY” STERN VIEW. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

OLD FRIEND PHIL  BALLINGER & MARK. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

OLD FRIEND PHIL BALLINGER & MARK.  MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

SEE YOU OVER THE NEXT SWELL JON NORGAARDE ON THE CAPE ALITAK. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

‘SEE YOU OVER THE NEXT SWELL’ JON NORGAARD ON THE CAPE ALITAK. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

"MISCHIEF" A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

“MISCHIEF” A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

ERIK & "GENERAL LEE" TOWING A HOUSE BARGE THAT LOST STEERING OUTSIDE THE LOCKS. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO,

ERIK & “GENERAL LEE” TOWING A HOUSE BARGE THAT LOST STEERING OUTSIDE THE LOCKS. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO,

 

JOE, MIKE & MARK A LIKLEY. BUNCH OF SUSPECTS. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

JOE, MIKE & MARK – A LIKLEY BUNCH OF SUSPECTS. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

BRAND NEW AND WE HELPED LAUNCH HER. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

BRAND NEW AND WE HELPED LAUNCH HER. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

MORE SUSPECTS TOM, JOE AND ERIK THEY LOKK TOHAPPY TO BE PRODUCTTIVE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

MORE SUSPECTS TOM, JOE AND ERIK THEY LOOK TOO HAPPY TO BE PRODUCTIVE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

YOM CUT THE CUTTY OFF THE FORWARD HATCH AND WILL BUILD A NEW ONE OUT OF ALUMINUM. Margie FREEMAN PHOTO.

TOM CUT THE CUTTY OFF THE FORWARD HATCH AND WILL BUILD A NEW ONE OUT OF ALUMINUM AS THE HATCH COVER. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TOM CUT AWAY A LARGE PIECE OF BAD STEEL ON THE PORT SIDE UNDER THE STUFFING BOX. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

TOM CUT AWAY A LARGE PIECE OF BAD STEEL ON THE PORT SIDE UNDER THE STUFFING BOX. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

MORE CREW  BRICE OUR VARNISH MAN, RICHIE ARE ALL AROUND MAN AND THE BOSS MARGIE. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

MORE CREW BRYCE, OUR VARNISH MAN;  RICHIE OUR ALL AROUND MAN AND THE BOSS, MARGIE. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TOM HAS FITTED A NEW PIECE OF STEEL IN THE PORT SIDE BOTTOM. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

TOM HAS FITTED A NEW PIECE OF STEEL IN THE PORT SIDE BOTTOM. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TOM FITS AND JOE WELDS GREAT COMBINATION. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

TOM FITS AND JOE WELDS GREAT COMBINATION. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

WE REPLACED THE TEXAS DECK AS WELL AS THE UPPER BOBBY HATCH AND WILL REPLACE IT WITH A WINDOW THAT OPENS. tHE CUTTY DOORS JUST KEPT THE DRIFTWOOD OUT BUT THE HOT AIR JUST WENT SOUTH. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

WE REPLACED THE TEXAS DECK AS WELL AS THE UPPER BOOBY HATCH AND WILL REPLACE IT WITH A WINDOW THAT OPENS. THE CUTTY DOORS JUST KEPT THE DRIFTWOOD OUT BUT THE HOT AIR JUST WENT SOUTH. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

NEW BULWARKS WITH A WELDED LINK FOR THE CLOSED CHOCK WORKS GREAT. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

NEW BULWARKS WITH A WELDED LINK FOR THE CLOSED CHOCK WORKS GREAT. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

ANOTHER BATCH OF LOCAL FILM.

 

 

"DIXIE" SHIFTING "SAMSON MARINER" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” SHIFTING “SAMSON MARINER”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

JON CHECKING UP ON US ON HIS THREE WHEEL BICYCLE I HAVE TOI GET ONE OF THOSE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

JON CHECKING UP ON US ON HIS THREE WHEEL BICYCLE I HAVE TO GET ONE OF THOSE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

SHIFTING THE "DEEP PACIFIC" AT PACIFIC FISHERMEN. EIRK FREEMAN PHOTO.

SHIFTING THE “DEEP PACIFIC” AT PACIFIC FISHERMEN. EIRK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE" SHIFTING HOUSEBARGE ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” SHIFTING HOUSE BARGE ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"COURAGEOUS" NEEDED A QUICK TURN AROUND AT THE TERMINAL ERIK SAID HE COULD DO IT BUT IT WOULD TAKE HIM ABOUT 5 MINUTES TO GET THERE AS HE HAD A LITTLE TIME BEFORE THE NEXT SHIFT WOULD START ACROSS THE SHIP CANAL FROM THEM. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“COURAGEOUS” NEEDED A QUICK TURN AROUND AT THE TERMINAL.  ERIK SAID HE COULD DO IT BUT IT WOULD TAKE HIM ABOUT 5 MINUTES TO GET THERE AS HE HAD A LITTLE TIME BEFORE THE NEXT SHIFT WOULD START ACROSS THE SHIP CANAL FROM THEM. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

 

MIKE SHERLOCK &

MIKE SHERLOCK & CHARLIE KOLLMEYER.

 

FROM LEFT JOHN TARABOCHIA, SPENCER OGRADY AND BIG STEVE IMOFF MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

FROM LEFT JOHN TARABOCHIA, SPENCER OGRADY AND BIG STEVE IMHOFF.  MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"FOSS 300" STEAM CRANE PICKING UP NEW HOUSE BARGE AND LAUNCH IT INTO SALMON BAY ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“FOSS 300″ STEAM CRANE PICKING UP NEW HOUSE BARGE AND LAUNCHING IT INTO SALMON BAY.   ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

ERIK TAKING PICTURES OF THE PICTURE TAKING BOAT. ERIK FREEMANPHOTO.

ERIK TAKING PICTURES OF THE PICTURE TAKING BOAT. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"FOSS 300" GETTING LINED UP. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

“FOSS 300″ GETTING LINED UP. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

SUCCESS. PHOTO BY MARGIE FREEMAN

SUCCESS. PHOTO BY MARGIE FREEMAN

 

RIC CAME BY WITH THE "FLYER" AFTER DOING A SALMON BAY SHIFT AND GAVE US A BIG WAVE.

RIC CAME BY WITH THE “FLYER” AFTER DOING A SALMON BAY SHIFT AND GAVE US A BIG WAVE.

 

"HALLE FOSS" AT THE FOSS PIER. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

“HALLE FOSS” AT THE FOSS PIER. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

A YOUNG BROS TUG THE "MALULANI" AT THE FOSS PIER. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

A YOUNG BROS TUG THE “MALULANI” AT THE FOSS PIER. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

"RICHARD BRUSCO" AT THE FOSS SHIPYARD. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

“RICHARD BRUSCO” AT THE FOSS SHIPYARD. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

BIG TUG MEET IN HAMBURG ATTENDING AND SENDING PHOTOS TO ME ARE RON BURCHETT, GARY KING, RAY MALONE AND PETER LIEBIG.——-THANKS FELLOWS

 

 

 

 

RAY BALONE, PETER LIEBIG AND RON BURCHETT AT THE TUG MEET IN HAMBURG. GARY KING PHOTO THANKS GARY.

RAY MALONE, PETER LIEBIG AND RON BURCHETT AT THE TUG MEET IN HAMBURG. GARY KING PHOTO, THANKS GARY.

 

PETER LIEBIG'S RC MODEL OF THJE "ARTHUR FOSS"AT THE TUG MEET IN HAMBURG.

PETER LIEBIG’S RC MODEL OF THE “ARTHUR FOSS”AT THE TUG MEET IN HAMBURG.

 

RON AND RAY FIXING MODEL THAT WAS SHIPPED IN BROKEN.

RON AND RAY FIXING MODEL THAT WAS SHIPPED IN BROKEN.

 

 

RON FIXING MODEL.

RON FIXING MODEL.

 

MODEL POOL AT HAMBURG.

MODEL POOL AT HAMBURG.

 

WHAT'S THIS RON IS FIXING THE SOFT DRINK DISPENSER?.

WHAT’S THIS?  COULD RON BE FIXING THE SOFT DRINK DISPENSER?.

 

 

 

OUR MAN AND WOMAN IN COOS BAY, BOB & GINNA RICHARDSON,  SEND ON THESE PHOTOS.

 

 

TUG BLANCO COMING OUT OF SOUTH SLOUGH WITH WORK BARGE.

TUG BLANCO COMING OUT OF SOUTH SLOUGH WITH WORK BARGE.

 

CANADIAN TUG SEA COMMANDER THEY ARE NOW USING U.S. TUGS AS THEY DONT HAVE TO PAY PILOTAGE.

CANADIAN TUG SEA COMMANDER THEY ARE NOW USING U.S. TUGS SO THEY DON’T HAVE TO PAY PILOTAGE.

 

ROUGH WATER AT SHORE ACRES.

ROUGH WATER AT SHORE ACRES.

 

PILOT GEORGE WALES=TUG CAPTAIN GUS BEAUDRY AND DECK HAND MIKE GRAHAM ALL HEADED HOME FOR COOS BAY.

PILOT GEORGE WALES; TUG CAPTAIN GUS BEAUDRY AND DECK HAND MIKE GRAHAM ALL HEADED HOME FOR COOS BAY.

 

PILOT GEORGE WALES MAKING THE RAILING ON A LOG SHIP.

PILOT GEORGE WALES MAKING THE RAILING ON A LOG SHIP.

 

NORTH BEND WITH CHIP SHIP.

NORTH BEND WITH CHIP SHIP.

 

NORTH BEND WAITING FOR A SHIP.

NORTH BEND WAITING FOR A SHIP.

 

CAPT. GUS BEAUDRY TAKING "BLANCO" HOME.

CAPT. GUS BEAUDRY TAKING “BLANCO” HOME.

 

 

 OUR MAN ON WHIDBEY ISLAND, STAN WHILLHIGHT, SENDS US MORE PHOTOS.

 

 

12-6-1989N"CINDY MOZEL" AT NEW WESTMINSTER.

12-6-1989  “CINDY MOZEL” AT NEW WESTMINSTER.

 

DUNLAP'S "SAMISH" AT TDECEPTION PASS.

DUNLAP’S “SAMISH” AT DECEPTION PASS. 12-13-1989.

 

 

11-14-1989  "TIGER" AT SEATTLE.

11-14-1989 “TIGER” AT SEATTLE.

 

11-14-1989  "CATHERINE FOSS,JUSTINE FOSS, SIDNEY FOSS AND JEFFERY FOSS" AT SEATTLE.

11-14-1989 “CATHERINE FOSS, JUSTINE FOSS, SIDNEY FOSS AND JEFFERY FOSS” AT SEATTLE.

 

 

2-13-1990 "ASTORIA" AT SEATTLE.

2-13-1990 “ASTORIA” AT SEATTLE.

 

1-13-1990  "MAGIC" AT SEATTLE.

1-13-1990 “MAGIC” AT SEATTLE. A SKIP LAMPMAN TUG.

 

1-13-1990  "ELK II " AT SEATTLE.

1-13-1990 “ELK II ” AT SEATTLE. A SKIP LAMPMAN TUG.

 

 

 

 

 

A very large thank you to Captain Thomas (SKIP) Lampman  who donated his family collection of tugboat and marine photos

to our Marine Museum. We will be sharing the photos as I go thru them.  In the July Blog we had one photo of a tug dad had -

the “SERVICE” - in Skips collection.  It was a photo of the B&A NO. 3 which is what her first name was, thanks Skip.

No final word on the Canadian tug “IVANHOE” we still don’t know if she will be scrapped.

 

 

 

Thanks to all of you who send in pictures and facts so that I can share the information one photo at a time.    Anything that you send me, I can scan and send back to you good as new.

WANTED:

  1. Crowley decals and cloth patches for jackets of caps. The one I really like says “Red Stack Tugs”.

  2. Old Cary-Davis & Puget Sound Tug & Barge Photos & advertisements.

  3. Old cannery tender & log towing photos.

  4. We buy old tug and waterfront photos or collections and snapshots, as well as old (pre 1946) Marine Digest Magazines in any condition.

  5. Information wanted: in an article in the Yachting magazine, it stated that Doc Freeman bought a tug named

  6. LEWIS II in 1943. He got her from Bellingham Tug & Barge and I can’t seem to track her down, any ideas?

  7. Want builders plate off the Coast Guard Cutter BONHAM. I gave it to Jim Valentyne after dad bought the BONHAM.

 

All the best from:

Mark & Margie Freeman, Captains Erik & Tom, Miss Blue, Richie, The Mark Freeman Maritime Museum,

Tatoosh Towing & Salvage, Fremont Boat Co. Fremont Tugboat Co. and the three cats; Indy (Braveheart), Razz

and Batman (all three cats came from a no-kill shelter about 4 years ago,)

PS:  Please donate to the Northwest Seaport to help repair the ARTHUR FOSS - you saw the pictures of the CHICKAMAUGA being dismantled in Port Townsend – we sure don’t want that to happen the ARTHUR FOSS.

 

 

 

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Captain Mark Freeman’s Rudderless for June 14, 2014

CAPT. MARK.
CAPT. MARK.

 

OUR LOGO.

OUR LOGO.

 

-1

 

 

The Bilge Pump is the Official Log of the Northwest R/C Ship Modelers Club and they report that they named their June Meet at the Bellevue Pond ‘The Gordon Canney Memorial Regatta’ and that it was very much of a success and was well attended. Gordy was a really neat guy and we will miss him.

 

 

 

 

 

MARK & DOC FREEMAN

YOUNG MARK & DOC FREEMAN

 

 

 

My dad,”Doc”, bought and sold boats and everything else. He owned a great number of tugs – some he used in his business, others he bought and sold, some he sold on consignment. He bought and sold well over a thousand regular boats including several sailing ships, freighters, yachts, tugs, ferry boats and thousands of surplus vessels, landing barges, motor launches, skiffs dorys, yard oilers, freighters, deck barges, Coast Guard Cutters – if it floated Doc had something to do with it. Doc had a partner, Russ Gibson, - that’s where the name Freeman & Gibson came from – and dad even named his famous marine hardware store Freeman & Gibson. I think that they were partners from the end of the 1930s until about 1950 when the partnership was dissolved and the store became “Doc Freeman’s”.

Dad also invested funds from his old time employees and made them share holders in the various properties that he bought. Dad also had the Alaska Junk Co. as a partner in a lot of the big boat purchases. The government would at times have bids on three big freighters opening on the same day and you had to have a bid in on all them so it took a lot of ready cash to play that game. I also owned several tugs and barges and there is a story and pictures about all of them. My brother-in-law, Pat Stoppelman, and my sister, Merry, were in the tugboat business and they had at least 25 different tugs so my work is cut out for me – as if I didn’t have enough to do.

I thought that I should start putting them down in print as I turned 80 in March. I have kept all the files that I could lay my hands on. It takes six large deep file drawers that contain dad and Pat and Merry’s and my info on our boats.  Dad died in January 1963 when he just turned 60.

Any new info that you have, please pass it on to me. Some boats we have just a photo, others are mentioned in trade journals – and we don’t have hardly any files before WW II  and almost no photos during the war except for the trade journals. Silver was used in the war effort and you could not buy any film. Lucky that Joe Williamson and Ray Krantz, both famous marine photographers and friends of mine, took photos thru-out the war and I have a lot of their photos.

 TUG “MIZPAH”.

Tug MIZPAH: Official #:  202502; Ga,s;  15 gross ton; 10 net tons. Built as a steam passenger vessel in Olympia, Washington in 1905.  Length 49.6 feet; beam 12.1 feet and depth of hold 4.1 feet. Power 140 horsepower, Chrysler Royal straight 8 cylinder gas engine with a 4 ½ to 1 reduction gear which turned a 36 inch diameter prop.

She was built as a small steam passenger vessel for South Sound and operated as such until a devastating fire burned her to the waterline in 1915. She was rebuilt as a tug with a brand new, good-looking, house and kept her 75 horsepower steam engine. In 1922 she got new power with an early Fairbanks-Morse diesel and at that time it must have been a CO (crude oil) model. She got her self sunk in that famous bad storm of 1934 (the year that I was born what a bad omen!) and somewhere along the line her beautiful house was gone and a funny old house got built on her.

She was pretty tired when dad bought her in 1947. Lots of dry rot and a Chrysler Royal that needed a valve grind with a huge gas tank that had about 3 inches of dirt in the bottom of it. Dad hired old time skipper Ray Stickler to run her home to Fremont Boat Co. Well the engine quit in West Pass on the way home, no radio of course, so Ray waited for the next tug to come out of the Pitt with gravel barges headed for the Locks since they all used West Pass going North because the current runs North all the time. In the distance Ray sees the HAZEL FOSS and starts waving to get their attention. The HAZEL FOSS  turns a little towards Ray and pretty soon the MIZPAH is tied alongside. Of course she does not slow the HAZEL FOSS (171 horsepower BUDA diesel) and her tow down any at all. He is headed for Salmon Bay Sand & Gravel. He ties up his scows and tows Ray to the end of the dock at Fremont Boat, Ray thanks him and he leaves headed for his next job.

We move the MIZPAH up inside on Dock 6 and I regularly check her bilges, as a new to us boat, eternal vigilance is the price of being afloat. About three days go by and dad gets a letter from Foss Launch & Tug for towing the MIZPAH home and its about three times what it should be. Dad paid it but he wanted to send Paul Pearson the general manager a toy gun and a mask in the mail but he never did. Anyway, Dad turned me loose on her and I went into our pile and got a couple of rope fenders about 4 feet x 18 inches to put at the spring position to help fender her when we took tows alongside, and I made up deck lines and a tow line for her. She was over 50 feet long and did not even have a bunk nor a head - typical old Freeman boat. She had a small square pilot house with a galvanized steering wheel (good for the compass) and a Johnson bar to shift the engine, a box compass and wood stove but no sink. I put our two inch Yaeger scow pump and 50 feet of heavy black suction hose, a couple of 5 gallon cans of gas and a fire hose and other trinkets that I got out of our various piles. It was not hard to outfit a boat with all the stuff dad had off old boats and if I asked permission every so often I could get something out of his marine store but I had better been rummaging through the old stuff first.

My steady job for dad was ‘boat pumper’. He was buying and selling surplus landing barges, motor launches, whale boats and Landing Craft Medium in 50 and 56 feet lengths. All these boats were open to the rain and during the rainy season they had to be pumped almost every day and at times he would have as many as 40 boats. So after school I would fire up the MIZPAH and go next door to Stricklands Dock where we tied up the small boats and start pumping. That meant come along side and tie up, drag the heavy hose into the first boat, start the pump and prime the pump and clean out the bilges so that the suction would not plug and as soon as that part was pumped move the suction to the next compartment; the hulls all had water tight bulkheads so you had to pump in at least two places. Then move the suction hose to the next boat and repeat - definitely a young man’s job. It was just like doing chores on a farm – a lot of times I would stop and have dinner with the folks and then go back to pumping. Of course all the time I was learning how to run a 50 foot tug and part of the time I was shifting other boats and I was beachcombing logs in any spare time that I had left. The MIZPAH’s engine was in bad need of a valve grind and had very low compression so I learned to deal with a balky engine as well. We kept part of dad’s fleet at Northlake Boat Sales where Tillicum is on Northlake just east of Stoneway. Dad had the ferry CITY OF STEILACOM tied up there and about once a week it needed to be pumped so I would run over with the MIZPAH, stretch out the 50 foot suction hose down inside her, crawl back out, start the pump, prime the pump and hope it would start pumping. Of course I would shut off the MIZPAH and if she would not start I had to go inside the engine room and unscrew the spark plugs and prime the cylinders with raw gas, put the plugs back in her and maybe this time she would run - that comes from low compression.

I rented her from dad to tow my beachcomb log rafts to Puget Sound Log Patrol up the Duwamish River near Siler Mill. I remember gas was 25 cents a gallon and she would burn an easy 5 gallons an hour. Dad volunteered her services during the first two Lake Union Cleanups. We were wrecking the west half of Seth Green’s property and made a neat raft of all the debris to include it with all the stuff that was in the big bag behind me except that dad had put my tug the SEALROCK inside the dirt boom as a joke. We had enough logs, old docks and debris to fill the large Locks. That’s about the same as an 8 section log raft! That was an all day job with other boats bringing out logs and stuff to put in the giant bag.

We went everywhere with her. I remember a lot of trips to Bremerton and Manchester for surplus boats, but no matter what time I got in at night, you went to school the next morning. I know Jack McCrary and I got in about 0500 one morning and I was in school at 0800 for my first class - I was 14 and I needed my sleep but that did not phase dad he said ‘up and at em’, no sympathy at all but I was learning a trade that I would use the rest of my life. One of the funniest jobs we did was the burning of the steam whaler UNIMAK. Dad and Russ bought her surplus, she was just over a 100 feet long and had been built as a steam powered whaling ship with the gun on the bow and was taken over by the government during WW II. We could not sell her and dad was thinking of making a big tug out of her and putting a 300 horsepower ATLAS or some big heavy duty in her but that never happened. So he decided to scrap her.  We took her Pilot House off and put it on this 110 foot barge and Jack McCray and I towed the barge with the MIZPAH over to Russ Gibson’s home on Treasure Island in Port Madison and unloaded it there to become a guest house. It was a very heavy steel house and did not come ashore easily but good old Jack knew how to move it so it did come ashore - I think that it is still there. Then we removed all the wood from inside the UNIMAK while she was tied up at the end of Dock 4 at Fremont Boat. It got to the point where the wood left was very well built into the hull and cabins so dad said we could have a small fire inside her and burn the wood out, then it would be easy to cut her up for scrap. I thought ‘now this ought to be fun, I wonder where dad will burn her at’. I soon found out. Jack and I were going to burn her out of King County on the eastern side of Lake Washington. Dad  put a notice in the Marine Digest that he was going to burn her so that everyone would know what we were doing. On a nice sunny day I took the MIZPAH out to the end of the dock and made up to the UNIMAK  and we started our trip. It took a couple of hours to get to the right spot. We rigged a wire strap at her bow so that we could shackle into it and all we had to do was stay up wind. We poured a bunch of diesel oil all over the wood and lit it off and went up to her bow and made up to our wire and just kept her up wind. It burned and of course made clouds of black smoke - I forgot the camera so no photos of her blazing away. She burned for a couple of hours and when it was just about out we came back alongside with our 2 inch pump and a fire hose and put the rest of the fire out. Then I took her alongside and headed back to Fremont Boat. We had just entered Union Bay when here comes Harbor Police Boat No.1 at full speed. There was no smoke coming from our tow and we wondered where he was going in such a hurry. We were just tying her up at the end of Dock 4 when Patrol No.1 comes alongside and Tony hollers at us ‘Was that you that was on fire?’ We admitted to our sins but said we were probably out of your jurisdiction. He left in a huff and nothing was ever said by anyone. Now just think if you tried a stunt like that today, it was sure a lot more fun in the old days we weren’t over-governed, over-regulated and there was some common sense used. Anyway, I think we finished cutting her up at the Railwater Terminal in Ballard.

After a couple of years a fellow came along and bought the MIZPAH  for $1,500. And he wanted all my dog gear that I had stored on her but dad said ‘no, that’s the kids log gear’. Dad had paid $1,000 for her and we used her for two years so that was a good deal. We told the buyer about all the dry rot in her and what was wrong with her but for that price he was okay with it. Unfortunately she was reported sunk and ashore at Stick Point. The story we got was in the middle of winter the ice comes off the Skagit flats and he just opened up the hull while running through the ice sheets. He wasn’t the only one to have that happen to them. Sad ending for an old boat but she had just about outlived her usefulness. But I had learned how to run a real tug with her, so she will always have a special spot in my heart.

Just a couple more sea stories. don’t they all start “Now This is No Crap”? Anyway, it was after dark and we heard fire engines and dad said to start the MIZPAH and the 2 inch Yeager scow pump and hook up a fire hose to the pump. I ran down stairs (we always lived above the business) and out on the dock and fired up the MIZPAH and I had the pump running by the time dad and a couple of other fellows jumped aboard. There was a fire on board one of the big Fish & Wildlife boats at the foot of Stoneway. Dad backed her out of the hole and we raced over and came up alongside – it was either the BROWN BEAR or the PELICAN? I started wetting down the fire on our side and the firemen took care of the rest of it. Never boring living at Fremont Boat.

My folks also gave lessons in all departments and if not answered quickly my dad had an awful big foot. Seems like dad said to take the MIZPAH and fire up the big scow pump and go next door to Vesojas Marina and pump out this 40 foot cruiser that they have almost salvaged. They had it so the deck was out of water but their pump would not quite pull it down far enough to make her float. So I came alongside and put the suction in and about an hour later she was floating. While I was pumping her I had to clear the suction numerous times and I saw a nice pair of diagonal pliers laying in the bilge and my tool box did not have one of that type. I thought about it and said to myself ‘Well no one will miss those if I just stick them in my pocket’, which is what I did. I finished pumping, took the tug home and tied her up, gassed up the pump so that it was all ready for the next job and took the pliers out of my pocket.  They were really neat and put them in my tool box and went upstairs. Well a couple of hours went by and I couldn’t stand it. I put the pliers in my pocket, went next door to where the sunken boat – now raised was –  and opened the door and placed the pliers in the bilge where I had found them and went home and had a real good night’s sleep. There was no way that I would ever become a thief, it wasn’t in me. I had at least learned some of the lessons that my folks were teaching - lucky me!!!!!!!

"MIZPAH" AS A STEAMER. ROBIN PATERSON PHOTO.
“MIZPAH” AS A STEAMER. ROBIN PATERSON PHOTO.

""MIZPAH" BACKING AWAY FROM A LANDING. ROBIN PATERSON PHOTO.
“”MIZPAH” BACKING AWAY FROM A LANDING. ROBIN PATERSON PHOTO.

"MIZPAH" REBUILT AS A TUG WITH AN ENGINE CHANGE PREPARING TO PICK UP LUMBER SCOWS.
“MIZPAH” REBUILT AS A TUG WITH AN ENGINE CHANGE PREPARING TO PICK UP LUMBER SCOWS.

"MIZPAH" WITH PILE DRIVER.
“MIZPAH” WITH PILE DRIVER.

HE IS PRETTY PROUD OF HER. PHOTO FROM CHUCK FOWLER.
HE IS PRETTY PROUD OF HER. PHOTO FROM CHUCK FOWLER.

DOC AND RUSS BOUGHT "MIZPAH"
DOC AND RUSS BOUGHT “MIZPAH”

BILL OF SALE ON "MIZPAH"
BILL OF SALE ON “MIZPAH”

"MIZPAH" HOME ON DOCK 6 AT FREMONT BOAT IN FRONT OF OUR HOUSE. "DOC "FREEMAN PHOTO.
“MIZPAH” HOME ON DOCK 6 AT FREMONT BOAT IN FRONT OF OUR HOUSE.  NOW THE WORK BEGINS.  “DOC” FREEMAN PHOTO.

"MIZPAH" UNDERWAY AT LEAST WE GOT HER RUNNING. RAY KRANTZ PHOTO.
“MIZPAH” UNDERWAY – AT LEAST WE GOT HER RUNNING. RAY KRANTZ PHOTO.

MOTHER AND I ON "MIZPAH". DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.
MOTHER (May Freeman) AND MARK  ON “MIZPAH”. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

MAY FREEMAN STANDING ON "MIZPAH" IN THE SNOW. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.
MAY FREEMAN STANDING ON “MIZPAH” IN THE SNOW. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

"MIZPAH" WITH 90 FOOT SCOW WITH PILOT HOUSE OFF WHALER UNIMAK ON IT AND WE ARE UNLOADING THE PILOT HOUSE ON TREASURE ISLAND FOR RUSS GIBSON. PHOTO BY RUSS GIBSON.
“MIZPAH” WITH 110 FOOT SCOW WITH PILOT HOUSE OFF THE WHALER UNIMAK ON IT. WE ARE UNLOADING THE PILOT HOUSE ON TO TREASURE ISLAND FOR RUSS GIBSON. PHOTO BY RUSS GIBSON.

"UNIMAK"
“UNIMAK”

BOB SHREWSBURYS "ROSE" AND THE "MIZPAH" NOW THE "ROSE" IS WHAT A REAL TUG SHOULD LOOK LIKE, RAY KRANTZ PHOTO.
BOB SHREWSBURY’S “ROSE” AND THE “MIZPAH”. NOW THE “ROSE” IS WHAT A REAL TUG SHOULD LOOK LIKE.  RAY KRANTZ PHOTO.

There were several small wooden tugs built by the Government during WW II for the Army. The smallest, a 26 footer called a Mine yawl, was a wooden planked boat. Next was a 28 foot pusher tug with a ‘J’ designation, they had a 52 horsepower Gray Marine and were built of plywood. We bought 10 of them in one sale. After that came 36 foot MT (motor tug) also a planked wooden boat. The largest was the MTL (motor tug large) and they were 45 feet long and had a Chrysler Royal 141 horsepower for power and also were a planked wooden tug like Oscar Johnson’s TRAVELLER or the OMER FOSS. Of the same length as the MTL were the steel 45 footer’s called ST (small tug) like the STANDFAST. They came with a heavy duty Kalenberg or a Model 1879 Buda. There were all kinds of tugs both wood and steel that carried MT, ST and J designations and of course when you got into the bigger tugs you ran across the DPC and LT boats and bigger ST types plus the Navy had their own designations.

The only records that I can find are for MT 322 , MT 316 and MTL 941 which shows Freeman & Gibson and Fremont Boat Co. as purchasers. The MT 322 was purchased on 21 December, 1945 and she had been built by Albert Jensen Shipyard in South Friday Harbor. Her dimensions were: length 36 feet; beam 11.3 feet and depth 5 feet. Two small wood tugs were purchased by Fremont Boat Co. from the War Shipping Administration in the San Francisco area. They were the MT 316 which was built by Grays Harbor Shipping and the MTL 941 which was built by Robinson Marine Construction of Benton Harbor, MI. I have no records to show who bought them nor do they appear in the Merchant Vessel of the United States. They were either shipped overseas or numbered under the Coast Guard numbering system for a vessel under 5 net tons as legally any commercial vessel over 5 net tons has to be documented under the laws of the United States.

MINE YAWL. PHOTO FROM U.S. ARMY SHIPS AND WATERCRAFT PF WORLD WAR II BY DAVID H. GROVER.
MINE YAWL. PHOTO FROM U.S. ARMY SHIPS AND WATERCRAFT OF WORLD WAR II BY DAVID H. GROVER.

PHOTO FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.
PHOTO FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

MT TUG.
MT TUG.

MT TUG ON FLAT CAR HEADED FOR INTERIOR ALASKA. PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.
MT TUG ON FLAT CAR HEADED FOR INTERIOR ALASKA. PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

MTL TUG DESIGN. FROM YACHTING MAGAZINE.
MTL TUG DESIGN. FROM YACHTING MAGAZINE.

MTL U.S. ARMY TUG AT HANFORD.
MTL U.S. ARMY TUG AT HANFORD.

Tug: PEARL, Official #: 204971; Ol.s.; 22 gross tons; 15 net tons. Registered length 49.0 feet; beam 13.6 feet and depth of hold 3.9 feet. She was built in 1908 at Deliske, Mississippi. 100 horsepower.

Dad had the PEARL for sale on consignment. She belonged to Johnson Tug & Barge at Port Angeles and was a log tower.  She was re-engined sometime, I think, just before WWII with a 150 horsepower Fairbanks Morse. I have no records in the file on her.

TUG "PEARL" PHOTO MARINE SALON JOE WILLIAMSON.
TUG “PEARL”.  PHOTO BY MARINE SALON JOE WILLIAMSON.

Launch- Taxi Boat – Tug:   PRONTO: Coast Guard #: 30E21. Length around 32 feet;  beam 9 feet; draft 3 feet. Unknown power or when built.

The only information that I have on the PRONTO are two photos showing cousin Al and I playing on her at our Millers Bay dock. I can clearly remember her when dad got her – she was a wreck. He installed a Ford 6 gas engine converted to a marine fresh water cooled engine and then sold her.

"PRONTO" AT MILLERS BAY, COUSIN AL AND MARK PLAYING BOAT.
“PRONTO” AT MILLERS BAY, COUSIN AL AND MARK PLAYING BOAT. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

"PRONTO" LONG AND THIN AND FAST. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.
“PRONTO” LONG AND THIN AND FAST. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

Tug – Pusher:  U. S. Army Numbers: J-901, 903, 908, 909, 910, 911, 912, 913, 914, 915. Location Port of Embarkation, Willmington, California.  Length 28 foot 8 inches; beam 9 foot 3 inches; construction plywood. Power: model 4-52 Gray Marine, 52 horsepower. Built 1943 by Chris-Franklin Manufacturing Co. of Edmonds, WA.

Freeman & Gibson were high bidders on the ten pusher tugs. Doc and Russ received late notification of the sale and Russ boarded a plane and flew to Los Angeles and bought the ten tugs. After the quick trip to buy the tugs now what? Do we do sell the tugs in California or bring them home. The decision was made to bring them home and there was really only one way to do that and that was by railroad. Great Northern was contacted and they had to scurry around to find long enough freight cars to handle two tugs at a time. Once the cars were located,  cradles had to be built and then the tugs had to be craned on board and lashed down.

They all arrived at the Interbay freight yard on this very cold (freezing) day in December on a weekend. Talk about mustering the troops. Wow. It seems like these ten tugs had ten engines that needed immediate draining because if that didn’t happen all the engines, which were full of water, would freeze and break into little pieces or chunks of iron. I have seen huge Cat diesels frozen and broken and manifolds that have been frozen and broken off the engines just laying on the engine room decks. Dad, mother, my sister, Merry, Russ Gibson and I descended on the rail yards with buckets, hoses, tools and a real fear of what might happen. We saved all the engines but we almost froze to death.

One of the funniest stories to come out of this project we refer to as “NOW, DOC?”.  If you fill a hose with water and two people each hold a thumb over the end and one drops one end of the hose lower than the other, you can drain an area if the water starts running out the of the low end of the hose first. But you have to be clever about it and each person has to do it in proper sequence and instantly release your end when the lead person says “now”.

We drained the engines into the hulls of the tugs. So we also had to pump the bilges that same day as you could not leave the water just sitting there because water freezing is stronger than plywood and it might just force the hulls apart like under the frames, etc. Well Russ was working with dad and dad would fill the hose and give Russ one end and droop the other end out of the boat to be lowest point and he would say “Now, Russ” when he was ready. So Russ was supposed to take his finger off the end of the hose which he held in the bilge. However, Russ would say “Now, Doc?” and miss the timing I don’t know how many times.  My dad lost his cool and hollered at every one within range but mainly at poor old Russ who did things just a little slower than Doc. And so it goes that it’s an eternal family joke.

I had learned that trick with the hose when I was supposed to drain the lifeboat on the UNIMAK and I could not get it thru my head how this worked. I got hollered at too.  I don’t think patience had any part in my dad’s makeup. We had the railroad cars switched over to Railwater Terminal and they put them in the water and we towed them back to Fremont Boat, put batteries in them and got them running and sold them all.

I went beachcombing with Pat Stoppelman when he owned the VAMOOSE. There were a lot of logs on the beach at Stick Point - of course in the snow. Pat had a jerk boat the MAY and it had been one of the ten pusher tugs but it was so light that it would not hardly jerk a small log off the beach. You would make up to the log and let out a bunch of towline and get up good speed and when the line came tight the boat just stopped and the log never moved. I could do more with a peavey rolling a log down the beach.

PHOTO FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.
PHOTO FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

PLANS FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE 1943.
PLANS FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE 1943.

ARTICLE FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE 1943.
ARTICLE FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE 1943.

STORYU FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE 1943.
STORY FROM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE 1943.

GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF SALE OF TEN PUSHER TUGS TO FREEMAN & GIBSON ON OCTOBER 29TH 1946.
GOVERNMENT NOTICE OF SALE OF TEN PUSHER TUGS TO FREEMAN & GIBSON ON
OCTOBER 29,1946.

ARTICLE FROM THE MARINE DIGEST MAGAZINE.
ARTICLE FROM THE MARINE DIGEST MAGAZINE.

ONE OF THE TEN PUSHER TUGS.
ONE OF THE TEN PUSHER TUGS.

Tug MONROE. Official #: 223217;  Ol.s; 8.6 gross tons; 5 net tons. Registered length 35.5 feet; beam 9.9 feet; depth of hold 4.1 ft. Built 1923 for Monroe Logging. Power: 24 horsepower oil engine.

In 1930 Monroe Logging had Everett Marine Ways build the tug A-1, about a 45 footer, for them to replace the MONROE. I owned the A-1 much later. The MONROE got out of the tugboat business and instead of towing logs she towed a shrimp trawl for an Everett fish dealer. Dad had her for sale at Fremont Boat Market and she did not sell but he needed a small tug so he bought her in the summer of 1941. Dad rebuilt her into a super juggle boat and she would pull right alongside tugs that were twice as big as her. The secret to her, and many others just like her, was the repowering with Chrysler gas engines with big reduction gears. Dad installed a Chrysler Crown 6 cylinder gas engine of 115 horsepower coupled to a 4.91 to 1 reduction gear. The engine would turn a 40” diameter with 24” of pitch at 500 rpms.  Dad leased her to Sound Construction Co. where she was handling heavy gravel scows and equipment barges at Bremerton Navy Yard. After the War Ben Mayo bought her and used her as a log salvage tug.

MONROE LAYING AT FREMONT BOAT MARKET. A DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.
“MONROE “LAYING AT FREMONT BOAT MARKET. A DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

A-1 IN 1986 OLYMPIA TUGBOAT RACE.
“A-1 “IN 1986 OLYMPIA TUGBOAT RACE.

"MONROE" LAYING AT FREMONT BOAT MARKET. A DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.
“MONROE” LAYING AT FREMONT BOAT MARKET. A DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

"MONROE" OUT OF WATER. A DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.
“MONROE” OUT OF WATER. A DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

"MONROE" ON TRIALS IN LAKE UNION. GAS PLANT IN BACKGROUND. A RAY KRANTZ PHOTO.
“MONROE” ON TRIALS IN LAKE UNION. GAS PLANT IN BACKGROUND. A RAY KRANTZ PHOTO.

ARTICLE ON THE "MONROE" FRPM THE PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.
ARTICLE ON THE “MONROE” FROM THE PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

CHRYSLER CROWN ADD FROM THE PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.
CHRYSLER CROWN AD FROM THE PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

Tug RUTH. Official #: 204347; ol.s Registered length 37.3 feet; beam 11.3; depth of hold 3.7 and she was about 45 feet overall.  12 gross tons and 8 net tons. Built in Astoria in 1907 with 45 horsepower. Owner was Pacific Fir.

She was a log tower for Pacific Fir Company and Doc bought her from them and then he rebuilt her from stem to stern. The old oil engine came out and a brand new Chrysler Royal 140 horsepower with a 4 ½ to 1 reduction gear was installed. That swung a 38 inch diameter propeller with a 29 inch pitch and that really kicked the tide out from under her. Dad sold her to Good News Bay Mining Co. in westward Alaska but sad to say she was caught in a surf line and was lost.

"RUTH" PULLING ON RAFT IN THE SHIP CANAL. A RAY KRANTZ PHOTO.
“RUTH” PULLING ON RAFT IN THE SHIP CANAL. A RAY KRANTZ PHOTO.

STORY ON "RUTH" FROM 1943 YACHTING MAGAZINE BY RAY KRANTZ.
STORY ON “RUTH” FROM 1943 YACHTING MAGAZINE BY RAY KRANTZ.

AD FOM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.
AD FOM PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

"RUTH" ON TRIALS IN LAKE UNION. A RAY KRANTZ PHOTO.
“RUTH” ON TRIALS IN LAKE UNION. A RAY KRANTZ PHOTO.

MORE TRIALS FOR "RUTH" A RAY KRANTZ PHOTO.
MORE TRIALS FOR “RUTH” A RAY KRANTZ PHOTO.

LOCAL CURRENT PHOTOS.

WE HAD A GREAT DAY OF BS ABOUT TUGBOATS WITH STEVE MAYO. ERIK AND I TOOK STEVE FOR A SMALL TUGBOAT RIDE. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
WE HAD A GREAT DAY OF BS ABOUT TUGBOATS WITH STEVE MAYO. ERIK AND I TOOK STEVE FOR A SMALL TUGBOAT RIDE. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

NEW SIGN FOR OUR HOUSEBOAT THAT TOM BULSON MADE ME FOR MY 80TH BIRTHDAY. "SEALROCK" AND "JERKMORE" MY FIRST TWO TUGS. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
NEW SIGNS FOR OUR HOUSEBOAT THAT TOM BULSON MADE ME FOR MY 80TH BIRTHDAY. “SEAL  ROCK” AND “JERKMORE” WERE MY FIRST TWO TUGS. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"GALENE" LEAVING FOR THE SEATTLE TUGBOAT RACES. RUSSEL SHREWSBURY ON THE "ARCTIC TITAN" WHO WON THE BIG BOYS DIVISION SAID THAT IF THE RACE HAD GONE ANOTHER MILE SKIP WOULD HAVE CAUGHT HIM. THE WWII MIKI TRUE OF ALL THE OLD BOATS HAVE GREAT HULL LINES BUT NOT TO MUCH HORSEPOWER AND THEY GO LIKE HELL LIKE I TOLD RUSS THEIR IS NOTHING THAT BEATS COMING IN NO 1. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“GALENE” LEAVING FOR THE SEATTLE TUGBOAT RACES. RUSSEL SHREWSBURY ON THE “ARCTIC TITAN” WHO WON THE BIG BOYS’ DIVISION SAID THAT IF THE RACE HAD GONE ANOTHER MILE SKIP WOULD HAVE CAUGHT HIM. THE WWII MIKI, TRUE OF ALL THE OLD BOATS, HAVE GREAT HULL LINES BUT NOT TOO MUCH HORSEPOWER AND THEY GO LIKE HELL. LIKE I TOLD RUSS THERE IS NOTHING THAT BEATS COMING IN NO 1. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"TERILYN" PUSHING A NEW SECTION OF THE FLOATING BRIDGE. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“TERILYN” PUSHING A NEW SECTION OF THE FLOATING BRIDGE. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

SEA & SHORES "PETER H" WAITING FOR THE FREMONT BRIDGE WITH HER CRANE SCOW. WE STOPPED ON OUR WAY HOME TO THANK THEM FOR ALWAYS WAVING WHEN THEY GO BY.  A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
SEA & SHORES “PETER H” WAITING FOR THE FREMONT BRIDGE WITH HER CRANE SCOW. WE STOPPED ON OUR WAY HOME TO THANK THEM FOR ALWAYS WAVING WHEN THEY GO BY. A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"THEA FOSS" COMPANY YACHT AND AN OLD TIME BEAUTY. A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“THEA FOSS” COMPANY YACHT AND AN OLD TIME BEAUTY. A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

WESTERN TUGS "WASP & "FLYER" MAKING A SHIFT AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
WESTERN TUGS “WASP & “FLYER” MAKING A SHIFT AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"BLUEBERRY" UNDERWAY CAPT. ERIK SWUNG BY TOUR HOUSEBOAT SO THAT I COULD GET A FEW PHOTOS. a MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“BLUEBERRY” UNDERWAY. CAPT. ERIK SWUNG BY OUR HOUSEBOAT SO THAT I COULD GET A FEW PHOTOS ON THE WAY TO HAUL HER OUT AT CSR BOATYARD.  A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"BLUEBERRY" OUT ON THE HARD AT CQR SHIPYARD IN BALLARD. A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“BLUEBERRY” OUT ON THE HARD AT CSR BOATYARD IN BALLARD. A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

CAPT. TOM BULSON MAKING LITTLE ONES OUT OF BIG ONES. WATCH OUT WHEN TOM PUTS ON HIS WELDING LEATHERS. A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
CAPT. TOM BULSON MAKING LITTLE ONES OUT OF BIG ONES. WATCH OUT WHEN TOM PUTS ON HIS WELDING LEATHERS. A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"BLUEBERRY" REPAIRS UNDER THE STARBOARD STUFFING BOX. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“BLUEBERRY” REPAIRS UNDER THE STARBOARD STUFFING BOX. THIS IS THE “BLUEBERRY’S” FIRST MAJOR HULL REPAIR SINCE SHE WAS BUILT IN 1941. BIRCHFIELD BOILER BUILT HER OF A HIGH NICKEL STEEL THAT HAS DONE A VERY GOOD JOB FOR 70 YEARS. SHE WAS SURPLUSED OUT OF THE COAST GUARD IN 1976 AND PETE WHITTIER GOT A HOLD OF HER AND REBUILT HER TOP SIDES. I LAUGHED WHEN ERIK ASKED MR WHITTIER HOW HE AFFORDED ALL THE TEAK WOOD THAT HE PUT INTO HER, PETE REPLIED “WELL ERIK, IF YOU BUY IT BY THE BOX CAR LOAD IT IS NOT TOO EXPENSIVE”.  MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"BLUEBERRY" REPAIRS NEW STEEL UNDER STARBOARD STUFFING BOX. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“BLUEBERRY” REPAIRS. NEW STEEL UNDER STARBOARD STUFFING BOX. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"BLUEBERRY" REPAIRS NEW STEEL UNDER STARBOARD STUFFING BOX. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“BLUEBERRY” REPAIRS NEW STEEL UNDER STARBOARD STUFFING BOX. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

CAPTAIN TOM BULSON MASTER BUILDER. THERE IS NOT ANYTHING THAT TOM CANT FIX. STEEL WORK OR WOOD WORK MAKES NO DIFFERENCE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
CAPTAIN TOM BULSON MASTER BUILDER. THERE IS NOT ANYTHING THAT TOM CAN’T FIX. STEEL WORK OR WOOD WORK, MAKES NO DIFFERENCE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"BLUEBERRY" REPAIRS. tHIS WAS THE AFT CUTTY HATCH. there WERE THREE TEAK CUTTYS ALL ARE ROTTEN AND WE WILL BUILD ALUMINUM CUTTYS. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“BLUEBERRY” REPAIRS. THIS WAS THE AFT CUTTY HATCH. THERE WERE THREE TEAK CUTTYS – ALL ARE ROTTEN AND WE WILL BUILD ALUMINUM CUTTYS. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"BLUEBERRY" REPAIRS THIS WAS THE STARBGOARD BULWARKS TOM CUT OFF ALL THE BULWARKS FORWARD OF THE PILOT HOUSE AND WILL BUILD NEW STEEL ONES. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“BLUEBERRY” REPAIRS. THIS WAS THE STARBOARD BULWARKS. TOM CUT OFF ALL THE BULWARKS FORWARD OF THE PILOT HOUSE AND WILL BUILD NEW STEEL ONES. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"BLUEBERRY" REPAIRS NEW STEEL BULWARKS PORT SIDE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“BLUEBERRY” REPAIRS. NEW STEEL BULWARKS PORT SIDE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"BLUEBERRY" REPAIRS NEW BULWRKS STARBOARD SIDE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“BLUEBERRY” REPAIRS NEW BULWARKS STARBOARD SIDE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"BLUEBERRY" REPAIRS WE WILL PUT A INSERT IN THE BOW AND BUILD NEW FRAMES IN SIDE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO,
“BLUEBERRY” REPAIRS. WE WILL PUT AN INSERT IN THE BOW AND BUILD NEW FRAMES INSIDE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO,

"BLUEBERRY" REPAIRS TEXAS DECK AROUND UPPER BOOBY HATCH. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTOS.
“BLUEBERRY” REPAIRS. TEXAS DECK AROUND UPPER BOOBY HATCH. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTOS

"BLUEBERRY" REPAIRS TEXAS DECK REMOVE BOOBY HATCH AND DOORS, MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“BLUEBERRY” REPAIRS. REMOVE THE BOOBY HATCH AND DOORS ON THE TEXAS DECK.MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"BLUEBERRY" REPAIRS TEXAS DECK NEW STEEL DECK, WE WILL NOT PUT BACK THE BOOBY HATCH JUST THE DOORS BECAUSE WE DINT USE THIS WAY FOR ACCESS. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“BLUEBERRY” REPAIRS. NEW STEEL ON TEXAS DECK. WE WILL NOT PUT BACK THE BOOBY HATCH BECAUSE WE DON’T USE THIS WAY FOR ACCESS. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"BLUEBERRY" REPAIRS NEW STEEL TEXAS DECK FROM BELOW. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“BLUEBERRY” REPAIRS.  NEW STEEL TEXAS DECK FROM BELOW. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

THE CREW FROM LEFT BRYCE. CAPT.TOM. RICHIE. CAPT.ERIK AND CAPT MARK. A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO. SHE SHOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE PHOTO BUT WE COULD NOT FIND A PICTURE TAKER.
THE CREW FROM LEFT: BRYCE; CAPT. TOM; RICHIE; CAPT. ERIK AND CAPT MARK. A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO. SHE SHOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE PHOTO BUT WE COULD NOT FIND A PICTURE TAKER.

MORE CREW FRON LEFT TO-JOE TIFFANY AND RICHIE BORNEMAN HAVING AN ICE CREAM BREAK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
MORE CREW: FROM LEFT TO RIGHT-JOE TIFFANY AND RICHIE BORNEMAN HAVING AN ICE CREAM BREAK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

MARGIE & I WENT TO THE RADIO CONTROLLED MEETING IN BELLINGHAM MARITIME MUSEUM AND VISITED OLD FRIENDS, MORE FUN AROUND BOATS. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
MARGIE & I WENT TO THE RADIO CONTROLLED MODELERS MEETING IN BELLINGHAM MARITIME MUSEUM AND VISITED OLD FRIENDS. MORE FUN AROUND BOATS. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

A GREAT RC MODEL OF THE "GARY FOSS" AND MIKE LOOK AT THE HOUSE BARGE A TRAILER ON A RAFT WITH AN OUTBOARD FOR POWER. A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
A GREAT RC MODEL OF THE “GARY FOSS” AND MIKE S.: LOOK AT THE HOUSE BARGE ON THE RIGHT: A TRAILER ON A RAFT WITH AN OUTBOARD FOR POWER. A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO

MARGIE HAVING A GOOD TIME AT THE MODEL MEET. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
MARGIE HAVING A GOOD TIME AT THE MODEL MEET. A MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

MARK, BUZZ DANA, PAT DANA AND MARGIE. UNDERSTAND THAT BUZZ SOLD HIS TUG.
MARK, BUZZ DANA, PAT DANA AND MARGIE. UNDERSTAND THAT BUZZ SOLD HIS TUG.

THE MIKE & MARK SHOW.  A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
THE MIKE & MARK SHOW. A MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

SEATTLE TUG RACES.

"ARCTIC TITAN" RUSSELL  SHREWSBURY CAPTAIN WINNING THE CLASS A RACE.
“ARCTIC TITAN” CAPTAIN RUSSELL SHREWSBURY  WINNING THE CLASS A RACE.

"NOREEN WINNER SMALL TUG RACE. LINDA EVANS PHOTO.
“NOREEN” WINNER OF THE SMALL TUG RACE. LINDA EVANS PHOTO.

"RELIABLE"  LINDA EVANS PHOTO.
“RELIABLE”.  LINDA EVANS PHOTO.

THEA BELLE" SEATLE RACES. LINDA EVANS PHOTO.
“THEA BELLE” AT THE SEATLE RACES. LINDA EVANS PHOTO.

Scan

DENNIS HAVEN WORKED FOR BOYER IN THE MIDDLE 1950s IN S.E. ALASKA AND HE BROUGHT US A BUNCH OF PHOTOS AND I SHARE PART OF THEM WITH YOU.

1957 KENT HALVORSEN.
1957 KENT HALVORSEN.

KENT WITH "SUSAN H" NORTH OF DRY PASS.
KENT WITH “SUSAN H” NORTH OF DRY PASS.

WRANGELL NARROWS "HEIDI H" TOWING "SUSAN H" TAILING.
WRANGELL NARROWS “HEIDI H” TOWING WITH  “SUSAN H” TAILING.

"SUSAN H" ALONGSIDE RAFT AT CAPE POLE.
“SUSAN H” ALONGSIDE RAFT AT CAPE POLE.

"SUSAN H" ENTERING WARD'S COVE.
“SUSAN H” ENTERING WARD’S COVE.

TOWING A-FRAME FROM TRAITORS COVE.
TOWING A-FRAME FROM TRAITORS COVE.

BOYER SWEEPING UP.
BOYER SWEEPING UP.

THANKS DENNIS FOR ALL THE GREAT PHOTOS, I WILL SHARE THE OTHER PHOTOS WITH YOU ALL IN THE NEXT ISSUE.

HERE ARE MORE LOCAL PHOTOS.

TUGS "JEEP & GENERAL LEE" GETTING READY TO SHIFT THE "MARGARET LYN" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
TUGS “JEEP & GENERAL LEE” GETTING READY TO SHIFT THE “MARGARET LYN”.   ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"NIOLO" A KIRBY TUG. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“NIOLO” A KIRBY TUG. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"DIXIE" WITH "FOSS 300" AT KIVCHAK UNLOADING NEW SEINER "PAUL C, JOHNSON". ERID FREEMAN PHOTO.
“DIXIE” WITH “FOSS 300″ AT KVICHAK UNLOADING NEW FISHBOAT “PAUL C. JOHNSON”. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

NEW SEINER OUT OF THE BUILDING JUST GETTING READY TO SWING AND PUT HER IN THE WATER.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
NEW FISHBOAT OUT OF THE BUILDING JUST GETTING READY TO SWING AND PUT HER IN THE WATER. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"FOSS 300" JUST LOWERING NEW SEINER INTO SHIP CANAL.ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“FOSS 300″ JUST LOWERING NEW FISHBOAT INTO SHIP CANAL.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"FOSS 300" SHIFTING A NEW BUILD AT KVICHAK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“FOSS 300″ SHIFTING GEN 3 AT KVICHAK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"FOSS 300" PICKING NEW BUILD AT KVICHAK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“FOSS 300″ PICKING GEN 3 AT KVICHAK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

THREE TITAN CLASS TUGS AT WESTERN TOWBOAT ALONG WITH BEING SUPER MANUVERABLE I UNDERSTAND FROM RUSSELL THAT THEY ARE FAST. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
THREE TITAN CLASS TUGS AT WESTERN TOWBOAT. ALONG WITH BEING SUPER MANUVERABLE I UNDERSTAND FROM RUSSELL THAT THEY ARE FAST. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"VESTERAALEN" IN TOW BY "DIXIE" JUST OUT OF DRYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD ENROUTE BACK TO PACIFRIC FISHERMAN. SURE IS A PRETTY BGOAT. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“VESTERAALEN” IN TOW BY “DIXIE” JUST OUT OF DRYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD ENROUTE BACK TO PACIFIC FISHERMEN. SURE IS A PRETTY BOAT. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"FLYER" HANDLING FOSS DRYDOCK WITH NEW CROWLEY TUG IN IT. THEY TOW THE DRYDOCK OUT INTO THE SHIP CANAL WHERE THE WATER IS A LITTLE DEEPER TO GET THE DRYDOCK DOWN LOW ENOUGH TO DOCK AND UNDOCK A DEEP BOAT. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“FLYER” HANDLING FOSS DRYDOCK WITH NEW CROWLEY TUG IN IT. THEY TOW THE DRYDOCK OUT INTO THE SHIP CANAL WHERE THE WATER IS A LITTLE DEEPER TO GET THE DRYDOCK DOWN LOW ENOUGH TO DOCK AND UNDOCK A DEEP BOAT. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"DIXIE & GENERAL LEE" SHIFTING "AKUTAN" TO FUEL DOCK. SHE WAS A STEEL U.S.ARMY FS OR AKL AND HAVE GREAT HULL LINES. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“DIXIE & GENERAL LEE” SHIFTING “AKUTAN” TO FUEL DOCK. SHE WAS A STEEL U.S. ARMY FS OR AKL AND HAS GREAT HULL LINES. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"DIXIE" SHIFTING RUSSIAN FISHBOAT WITH A PUGET SOUND PILOT ONBOARD. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“DIXIE” SHIFTING RUSSIAN FISHBOAT “TIGIL” WITH A PUGET SOUND PILOT ON BOARD. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"DIXIE" WITH THE "BLUE ATTU" A PAT BURNS BOAT. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“DIXIE” WITH THE “BLUE ATTU” A PAT BURNS BOAT. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"DIXIE" SHIFTING "NEW HOPE" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“DIXIE” SHIFTING “GREEN HOPE”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"DIXIE " SHIFTING ??????????????????????????? HELP ERIK.
“DIXIE ” SHIFTING “BRISTOL EXPLORER”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

"GENERAL LEE" PUSHING "ISLAND SCOUT" EX "MIKIOLA" INTO #2 DD AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. TOM BULSON PHOTO.
“GENERAL LEE” PUSHING “ISLAND SCOUT” (EX- “MIKIOLA”)  INTO #2 DD AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. TOM BULSON PHOTO.

RON BURCHETT SENT IN THESE PHOTOS FROM THE MODEL MEET AT MAPLE BAY.

"ISLAND GUARDIAN" IN RC MODEL FORM AND JUST AS PRETTY AS THE REAL THING.
“ISLAND GUARDIAN” IN RC MODEL FORM AND JUST AS PRETTY AS THE REAL THING.

"DOG STAR" IS THE REAL THING BUILT TO TOW LOGS.
“DOG STAR” IS THE REAL THING BUILT TO TOW LOGS.

MORE LOCAL PHOTOS.

"COMMODORE" UP IN #2 DRYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“COMMODORE” UP IN #2 DRYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD.  LOOK AT THE NEW GRAY PAINT ON THE DRYDOCK.  MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

OTTO LOGGERS OF NORTHWEST SEAPORT AND CAPT. MARK AND TWO MODELS OF THE "ARTHUR FOSS" THAT MARK LOANED TO OTTO FOR THE FOSS 125TH ANIVERSARY GET TO GETHER. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

OTTO LOGGERS OF NORTHWEST SEAPORT AND CAPT. MARK WITH TWO MODELS OF THE “ARTHUR FOSS” THAT MARK LOANED TO OTTO FOR THE FOSS 125TH ANIVERSARY GET TOGETHER. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

125 YEAR OLD "ARTHUR FOSS"THAT MODEL IS SO NEAT THAT I CAN SMELL THE LUBE AND FUEL OIL THAT SHE IS BURNING. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
125 YEAR OLD “ARTHUR FOSS”. THAT MODEL IS SO NEAT THAT I CAN SMELL THE LUBE AND FUEL OIL THAT SHE IS BURNING. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

TRACTOR "ARTHUR FOSS" SHE IS THE NEW ONE. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
TRACTOR “ARTHUR FOSS” SHE IS THE NEW ONE. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

OUR "GRACE" EX "GRACE FOSS" ON HER WAY BACK FROM PIER 91 AND SALT WATER. Margie FREEMAN PHOTO.
OUR “GRACE” (EX-”GRACE FOSS”) ON HER WAY BACK FROM PIER 90 AND SALT WATER.  MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

CAPTAIN MARGIE BACKING OUT THE "JEEP" MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
CAPTAIN MARGIE BACKING OUT THE “JEEP”. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

COAST GUARD BUOY TENDER "MAPEL" I LOVE THEIR PAINT SCHEME. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
COAST GUARD BUOY TENDER “MAPLE”.  I LOVE THEIR PAINT SCHEME. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"SNAPPER" IS BACK IN THE LAKE AFTER REPAIRS. DAD BOUGHT HER SURPLUS FROM THE COAST GUARD AND SOLD HER TO DOC ERICKSON WHO IN TURN SOLD HER TO ROY BEARDEN WHO SOLD HER TO BILL FRANCIS. BILL DIED AND HIS SON CHARLIE GOT HER AND HIS SON RUNS HERE ALL THE TIME AND LEWIS NASMYTH DID THE DESIGN WORK. SHE WAS A 17 FOOT COAST GUARD MOTOR WORK BOAT. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
“SNAPPER” IS BACK IN THE LAKE AFTER REPAIRS. DOC FREEMAN BOUGHT HER SURPLUS FROM THE COAST GUARD AND SOLD HER TO DOC ERICKSON, WHO IN TURN SOLD HER TO ROY BEARDEN, WHO SOLD HER TO BILL FRANCIS. BILL DIED AND HIS SON, CHARLIE, GOT HER AND HIS SON RUNS HER HERE ALL THE TIME. LEWIS NASMYTH DID THE DESIGN WORK. SHE WAS A 17 FOOT COAST GUARD MOTOR WORK BOAT. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

JON NORGAARD'S "CAPE ALITAK" A CONVERTED SEINER. JON PUBLISHES ON THE INTERNET LOTS OF FISH BOAT PHOTOS IT IS QUITE A SITE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
JON NORGAARD’S “CAPE ALITAK” A CONVERTED SEINER. JON PUBLISHES ON THE INTERNET LOTS OF FISH BOAT PHOTOS, IT IS QUITE A SITE.  MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

JON DOWN AT THE "BLUEBERRY" BSING CAPT. ERIK AND CAPT MARK, HE GOES BACK AND FORTH ON HIS 3 WHEEL BICYCLE, I HAVE TO GET ONE OF THOSE. Margie FREEMAN PHOTO.
JON DOWN AT THE “BLUEBERRY” BS’ING CAPT. ERIK AND CAPT MARK. HE GOES BACK AND FORTH ON HIS 3 WHEEL BICYCLE, I HAVE TO GET ONE OF THOSE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
ALL WORK STOPS WHEN JON ROLLS UP. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
ALL WORK STOPS WHEN JON ROLLS UP. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

"ORBA" WAS GETTING A FEW NEW PLANKS AT CSR SHIPYARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
“ORBA” WAS GETTING A FEW NEW PLANKS AT CSR BOATYARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

HAD A GAM WITH MIKE AND PATTY ON THE WAY HOMW SUNDAY NIGHT. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.
HAD A GAM WITH MIKE AND PATTI ON THE WAY HOME ONE SUNDAY NIGHT. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

OUR MAN AND WOMAN, BOB & GINNA RICHARDSON, IN COOS BAY SEND ON MANY PHOTOS.

COAST GUARD CUTTER "ORCA" HEADED FOR SEA'
COAST GUARD CUTTER “ORCA” HEADED FOR SEA.

"CAPT LOUIE" AND HER TOWER FOR SEEING OVER BARGES.
“CAPT LOUIE” AND HER TOWER FOR SEEING OVER BARGES.

KNUTSON TUG "KAMACHA"
KNUTSON TUG “KAMACHA”

PILOT GEORGE WALES JUST COMING OFF LOG SHIP ONTO NORTH BEND.
PILOT GEORGE WALES JUST COMING OFF LOG SHIP ONTO NORTH BEND.
SAUSE OCEAN TOW TUG "POWATAN" HEADED FOR SEA .
SAUSE OCEAN TOW TUG “POWATAN” HEADED FOR SEA .

POWATAN AND HER BARGE GOING BY BOBS FRONT WINDOW.
“POWATAN” AND HER BARGE GOING BY BOB’S FRONT WINDOW.

OUR MAN ON WHIDBEY ISLAND, STAN WILLHIGHT, SENDS ME A WHOLE BUNCH OF PHOTOS AND I WILL SHARE THEM EACH MONTH WITH YOU.

2-17-1990 "KAYMAR" AT VAN B.C.
2-17-1990 “KAYMAR” AT VAN B.C.

"CHICKAMAUGA" BEFORE SHE BECAME HISTORY AT PORT TOWNSEND. 3-19-2014
“CHICKAMAUGA” BEFORE SHE BECAME HISTORY AT PORT TOWNSEND. 3-19-2014

"CHICKAMAUGA" AGAIN, FIRST FULL DIESEL TUGBOAT IN THE UNITED STATES AND SHE IS GONE. SEND DONATIONS TO THE "ARTHUR FOSS" SO THAT SHE DOESNT GO THIS WAY.
“CHICKAMAUGA” AGAIN, FIRST FULL DIESEL TUGBOAT IN THE UNITED STATES AND SHE IS GONE. SEND DONATIONS TO THE “ARTHUR FOSS” SO THAT SHE DOESN’T GO THIS WAY.

1-31-1990 TUG "PORTLAND"
1-31-1990 TUG “PORTLAND”

1-25-2014 DUNLAPS "SWINOMISH" OFF LOPEZ ISLAND IN THE SAN JUAN ISLANDS WITH A LOG TOW. SCOTT SCHOCK RUNS HER PART OF THE TIME.
1-25-2014 DUNLAPS “SWINOMISH” OFF LOPEZ ISLAND IN THE SAN JUAN ISLANDS WITH A LOG TOW. SCOTT SCHOCK RUNS HER PART OF THE TIME.

1-25-2014 I BET YOU CANT NAME THE TUG.
1-25-2014 I BET YOU CAN’T NAME THE TUG.

"IVANHOE IS GOING TO BE SCRAPPED UNLESS SOMEONE COMES UP WITH A PLAN TO SAVE HER SEE LETTER BELOW.
“IVANHOE” IS GOING TO BE SCRAPPED UNLESS SOMEONE COMES UP WITH A PLAN TO SAVE HER, SEE LETTER BELOW.

Scan

Thanks to all of you who send in pictures and facts so that I can share the information one photo at a time.    Anything that you send me, I can scan and send back to you good as new.

WANTED:

  1. Crowley decals and cloth patches for jackets of caps. The one I really like says “Red Stack Tugs”.

  2. Old Cary-Davis & Puget Sound Tug & Barge Photos & advertisements.

  3. Old cannery tender & log towing photos.

  4. We buy old tug and waterfront photos or collections and snapshots, as well as old (pre 1946) Marine Digest Magazines in any condition.

  5. Information wanted: in an article in the Yachting magazine, it stated that Doc Freeman bought a tug named

  6. LEWIS II in 1943. He got her from Bellingham Tug & Barge and I can’t seem to track her down, any ideas?.

  7. Want builders plate off the Coast Guard Cutter BONHAM. I gave it to Jim Valentyne after dad bought the BONHAM.

  8.                                Please donate to the Northwest Seaport to help repair the ARTHUR FOSS you saw the pictures of the CHICKAMAUGA being dismantled in Port Townsend we sure don’t want that to happen the ARTHUR FOSS. Now it looks like we will lose the Canadian tug IVANHOE to the scrappers unless someone takes her on. What a shame, she is in the same class as the ARTHUR FOSS. If they do scrap her I sure hope someone saves the Union Diesel but probably that is wishful thinking. Has the Canadian Government got any money for a really good cause? Eh!!!!!!!!!

 

Happy Flag Day today and Happy Father’s Day tomorrow!

All the best from:

Mark & Margie Freeman, Captains Erik & Tom, Miss Blue, Richie, The Mark Freeman Maritime Museum, TATOOSH TOWING & SALVAGE, FREMONT BOAT CO., FREMONT TUGBOAT CO. and the three cats  Braveheart (Indy), Razz and Batman (all three cats came from a no-kill shelter about 4 years ago,)

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Obituary for Merry Stoppelman 5-31-14

 

Obituary for Merry Stoppelman.

 

My sister, Merry J. Stoppelman (nee-Freeman), passed away on May 9, 2014 and will be missed by all. She was preceded in death by her husband, Patrick. She was born into the start of the Great Depression on Christmas Day to our parents O.H. (Doc) & May Freeman. I always kidded her that we were both Depression mistakes and she always laughed.

You might say that she was born into the boat business and was in it all her life. Our dad bought and sold boats and it was just like working on the farm at Fremont Boat. We both had our chores and there was many an engine room we washed down together and many a boat that we painted together. She was the sign painter in her very early years and became a real artist – winning awards in high school along with a years’ scholarship from the scholastic art awards. Later she became a fine arts painter and was even President of the Women Painters of Washington.

I remember one morning at the breakfast table that dad had to get this 60 foot fish scow over to the Grandy Boat Co. for inspection and he didn’t have a boat that was running so it was up to Merry and I to tow it over with our 14 foot cedar skiff. Dad said it was not very far – just over on Westlake and the wind would help us so off we went. Little did she know that little tow job was her start on tugboats.

Her husband to be, Pat Stoppelman, came courting in his tug VAMOOSE – as it was reported in the ‘Strolling Around Town’ article in one of the Seattle newspapers. There was a sketch of a small tug going ‘toot, toot’ and a caption that said “Here comes your sea going lochinvar daughter”. They were married a short time later and eventually had three children Howard, Scott and Paula.

They took their honeymoon on the VAMOOSE and later raised their first born, Howard, for a year on the tug WESTERN STAR before moving ashore to a Lake Union floating home. Pat was in the tugboat business for many years and they even moved to Sitka, Alaska to further his business. In 1967, Merry was the biscuit gunner on the tug POLAR STAR for Jim Hagen while Pat was Captain towing Northland barges back and forth to SE Alaska and the two boys were deckhands. Some days Merry had to get meals ready for up to sixteen people – no easy task on a 125 foot tug.

When she decided to get back into painting full time she was very successful. She and our mother also had great overseas trips together, creating many memories. Along the way of their more than 60 years of marriage, they moved to Camano Island having a beautiful home just south of Utsalady on the west shore where they could see all the tugs go by.

I’m happy to say that she had a full life as a wife, mother and grandmother of five along with wonderful maritime adventures and an abundance of creativity.

Rest in peace Merry, you are always in our hearts.

Your brother, Mark

 

 

 

 

DAD AND A VERY YOUNG MERRY.

DAD AND A VERY YOUNG MERRY.

 

MOTHER 7 MARK, DAD 7 MERRY AT THE OLD FREMONT BOAT CO.

MOTHER , MARK, DAD and MERRY AT THE OLD FREMONT BOAT MARKET.

 

THE OLD DAYS FROM RIGHT TO LEFT, MARK, MOTHER (MAY) MERRY AND UNKNOWN GIRL ON LEFT.

THE OLD DAYS FROM RIGHT TO LEFT, MARK, MOTHER (MAY) MERRY AND UNKNOWN GIRL ON LEFT.

 

MERRY & MARK ON FERRY BOAT "AIRLINE" THEIR HOME.

MERRY & MARK ON THEIR FERRY BOAT  HOME THE “AIRLINE”.

 

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT DOC & MAY, MERRY AND FAMILY FRIEND WADE HALL.

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT DOC & MAY, MERRY AND FAMILY FRIEND WADE HALL.

 

WE ALWAYS HAD CATS. MARK, MOTHER AND MERRY.

WE ALWAYS HAD CATS. MARK, MOTHER AND MERRY.

 

MARK,COUSIN AL HERMAN AND MERRY IN FRONT OF THE FAMILY HOME OVER DOC FREEMANS MARINE STORE.

MARK, COUSIN AL HERMAN AND MERRY IN FRONT OF THE FAMILY HOME OVER DOC FREEMAN’S MARINE STORE.

 

MARK & MERRY ON THE SEALROCK.

MARK & MERRY ON THE “SEALROCK”.

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AT MILLERS BAY. FROM SEFT PAUL YITTERDAHL, MERRY, PAT STOPPELMAN, BOB SHREWSBURY SR.  & MARK.

AT MILLERS BAY. FROM LEFT PAUL YITTERDAHL, MERRY FREEMAN, PAT STOPPELMAN, BOB SHREWSBURY SR. & MARK.

 

PAT & MERRY ON THE "VAMOOSE".

PAT & MERRY ON THE “VAMOOSE”.

 

TUGS "VAMOOSE & ROSE" LAYING IN STILL HARBOR. MERRY & BOB SHREWSBURY SR.

TUGS “VAMOOSE & ROSE” LAYING IN STILL HARBOR. MERRY & BOB SHREWSBURY SR.

 

 

RAT & MERRY ON THE BOW OF THE "NOREEN"

PAT & MERRY ON THE BOW OF THE “NOREEN”

 

MARK & MERRY & CATS.

MARK & MERRY & CATS.

 

PAT & MERRY.

PAT & MERRY.

 

PAT & SON HOWARD & MERRY.

PAT & SON HOWARD & MERRY.

 

FROM THE LEFT, MOTHER PAT, PAULA, MERRY, HOWARD & SCOTT & MARK AT MILLERS BAY.

FROM THE LEFT, MOTHER, PAT, PAULA, MERRY, HOWARD & SCOTT & MARK AT MILLERS BAY.

 

MERRY & SCOTT, HOWARD STANDING.

MERRY & SCOTT, HOWARD STANDING

 

FROM LEFT,MARK, SCOTT & PAT, MOTHER & HOWARD, DOC, PAULA & MERRY AT MILLERS BAY.

FROM LEFT, MARK, SCOTT & PAT, MOTHER & HOWARD, DOC, PAULA & MERRY AT MILLERS BAY.

 

FROM LEFT,GRANDMA FITZ, PAT & MERRY, HOWARD, PAULA, SCOTT & MARK WITH CAT.

FROM LEFT,GRANDMA FITZ, PAT & MERRY, HOWARD, PAULA, SCOTT & MARK WITH CAT

 

FROM LEFT, SCOTT, PAT & MERRY, HOWARD, MOTHER & PAULA, GRANDMA FITZ.

FROM LEFT, SCOTT, PAT & MERRY, HOWARD, MOTHER & PAULA, GRANDMA FITZ.

 

 

Scan

 

 

 

 

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SCOTT AND MERRY ON "POLAR STAR"

HOWARD AND MERRY ON “POLAR STAR”

 

MERRY & PAT.

MERRY & PAT.

 

PAT & MERRY.

PAT & MERRY.

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FAMILY PORTRAIT.

FAMILY PORTRAIT.

 

MERRY.

MERRY.

 

MERRY    REST IN PEACE.

MERRY.  REST IN PEACE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments (1)


CAPTAIN MARK FREEMAN’S “RUDDERLESS” MAY 14, 2014

CAPT. MARK.

CAPT. MARK

 

OUR LOGO THANKS TO BILL GARDEN & JOHNNY ADAMS.

OUR LOGO THANKS TO BILL GARDEN & JOHNNY ADAMS.

 

Scan

DOC FREEMAN BEFORE 1938.

DOC FREEMAN BEFORE 1938.

 

My dad, “Doc”, bought and sold boats and everything else. He owned a great number of tugs – some he used in his business, others he bought and sold, some he sold on consignment. He bought and sold well over a thousand regular boats including several sailing ships, freighters, yachts, tugs, ferry boats and thousands of surplus vessels, landing barges, motor launches, skiffs dorys, yard oilers, freighters, deck barges, Coast Guard Cutters – if it floated Doc had something to do with it. Doc had a partner Russ Gibson that’s where the name Freeman & Gibson came from dad even named his famous marine hardware store Freeman & Gibson. I think that they were partners from the end of the 1930s until about 1950 when the partnership was dissolved and the store became “Doc Freemans”. Dad also invested funds from his old time employes and made them share holders in the various properties that he bought. Dad also had the Alaska Junk Co. as a partner in a lot of the big boat purchases. The government would at times have bids on three big freighters opening on the same day and you had to have a bid in on all them so it took a lot of ready cash to play that game. I also owned several tugs and barges and there is a story and pictures about all of them. My brother in-law Pat Stoppelman and my sister Merry were in the tugboat business and they had at least 25 different tugs so my work is cut out for me as if I didn’t have enough to do.

I thought that I should start putting them down in print as I turned 80 in March. I have kept all the files that I could lay my hands on. It takes six large deep file drawers that contain dad and Pat & Merrys and my info on our boats.  Dad died in January 1963 when he just turned 60. Any new info that you have, please pass it on to me. Some boats we have just a photo, others are mentioned in trade journals – and we don’t have hardly any files before WW II  and almost no photos during the war except for the trade journals. Silver was used in the war effort and you could not buy any film. Lucky that Joe Williamson and Ray Krantz both famous marine photographers and friends of mine took photos through out the war and I have a lot of their photos.

 

 

Fremont Boat Logo

 

Cannery Tender-Tug  HYAK: Official #: 203968; Ol.s; built in 1907 at Astoria, Oregon. Registered Length 55.8 feet; Beam 13.1; Depth of Hold 4.1 feet; 28 Gross Tons; 23 Net Tons. Dad owned her during the early 1950s. I have no records of who he sold her to but I think that she was purchased from Keller Fishing & Packing because she still had Keller signs on her. Someone had cut a salmon out of plywood and painted Keller on them. She had a 6-71 GM diesel with a 3:1 reduction. She had extensive dryrot in her hull and house. She was like a knife in the water and plenty fast and pulled good. I can remember shifting a 136 foot minesweeper with her and how well she handled it alongside. She was not as good on the towline. I went down to Drumond Literage in the West Waterway and picked up a 110 foot flat deck barge which I towed to Renton. There I loaded a house on the barge and took her to Everett. But the towbitts on the HYAK were so far aft that the barge kept trying to put you in irons and you had to fight her all the time. The house movers rolled the house off the barge and I towed her back to Drumond’s. Rudy Becker was my deckhand for the trip and he was hard to wake up. He was 40, I would guess, and I was 17 and for some guys they always think that they know more than the young guy.

 

 

HYAK FOR SALE AT OUR NORTHLAKE BOAT SALES YARD. SHE STILL HAS THE FISH PACKER SIGNS ON HER.

“HYAK” FOR SALE AT OUR NORTHLAKE BOAT SALES YARD. SHE STILL HAS THE FISH PACKER SIGNS ON HER. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

STERN VIEW OF THE HYAK. SHE WAS A NEAT OLD BOAT. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

STERN VIEW OF THE “HYAK”. SHE WAS A NEAT OLD BOAT. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

 

TUG HYACK: OFFICIAL COAST GUARD #: 30L838. Length 32 feet;  40 horsepower Gas engine; built by Ackles & George at Hoodsport for the Olympia Oyster Company. Doc had her for sale on consignment and she was sold but I don’t know to who. She was a really pretty little tug and we have lots of photos of her in the 1938 scrap book.

 

HYACK AS PRETTY A LITTLE TUG AS I HAVE EVER SEEN.

“HYACK” AS PRETTY A LITTLE TUG AS I HAVE EVER SEEN.

 

HYACK

“HYACK”

 

 

HYACK IN DRYDOCK

“HYACK” IN DRYDOCK

 

 

HYACK FOR SALE AT FREMONT BOAT MARKET

“HYACK” FOR SALE AT FREMONT BOAT MARKET

 

HYACK IN DRYDOCK. THERE USED TO BE A RAILWAY ON THE WEST SIDE OF VIC FRANKLS SHIPYARD.

“HYACK” IN DRYDOCK. THERE USED TO BE A RAILWAY ON THE WEST SIDE OF VIC FRANKS SHIPYARD.

 

 

HYACK CHARGING ALONG ON LAKE UNION.

“HYACK” CHARGING ALONG ON LAKE UNION.

 

 

Cannery Tender – Tug JOHN L.C.: Official #: 204998; Ol.s; Registered Length: 62.9 feet; Beam: 14.6 feet; Depth of hold: 3.9 feet; 26 Gross Tons; 18 Net Tons.

Built in 1906 at Astoria, Oregon. Power 6-71 GM Diesel, 165 horsepower with a 3:1 reduction gear.  Owner in 1937 was Libby McNeil & Libby. I have photos in 1938 and 1939 of the JOHN L.C. for sale at our moorings at Fremont Boat Market at its new location of 1059 N. Northlake Ave.  She was in pretty rough shape with the house all torn apart like someone had removed the engine; and, of course, the house was never fixed.

I think dad owned her and he sold her to C.C. Croft who built a tug out of her for towing logs in Alaska.  A 6-71 GM with a 3:1 gear was installed in her.  Croft made a really decent looking boat out of her.  Mr. Croft sold the tug back to Doc when he retired in the middle 1950s and I have several photos of me doing towing for dad when I was in the Coast Guard.  I have one photo of Roland E. Miller decking for me when I towed the CHRIS FOSS home from Kennydale in November, 1956.  Roland was a shipmate and a BM2 at the Grays Harbor Lifeboat Station.  I always liked running her.  She had a bed spring in the middle of the charging system.  It glowed hot when you ran the main engine – I think that it was used as a resistor.  It worked well, but I always wondered who the smart guy was that figured the system out.

 

 

 

JOHN L.C. LOOKING PRETTY SAD WHOEVER TOOK OUT THE ENGINE ALMOST RUINED THE HOUSE. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

“JOHN L.C.” LOOKING PRETTY SAD. WHOEVER TOOK OUT THE ENGINE ALMOST RUINED THE HOUSE. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

 

 

JOHN L C AT FREMONT BOAT MARKET BEFORE THE WAR.

“JOHN L.C. “AT FREMONT BOAT MARKET BEFORE THE WAR.

 

 

JOHN L C  LOOKING BETTER CROFT WAS GOOD FOR THE BOAT. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

“JOHN L. C. ” LOOKING BETTER. CROFT WAS GOOD FOR THE BOAT.   DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

JPHN L C  DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

“JOHN L. C.”.  DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

CAPT. MARK ON LIBEWRTY FROM THE COAST GUARD YOU CANT SAY THAT I DIDNT KNOW WHERE MY COMPASS WAS POINTED. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

CAPT. MARK ON LIBERTY FROM THE COAST GUARD. YOU CAN’T SAY THAT I DIDN’T KNOW WHERE MY COMPASS WAS POINTED. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

JOHN L C  LAYING AT NORTHLAKE BOAT SALES. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

“JOHN L.C.”  LAYING AT NORTHLAKE BOAT SALES. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

Doc had two tugs for sale that belonged to James Draham in Olympia, WA. They were the SKOOKUM and the ISKUM.  Tug ISKUM: Official # 210082; registered length 48 feet; Beam 12.8 feet; and depth of hold 4.9 feet. She was built in 1912 at Winslow, WA and had 50 horsepower when she was built. In 1937 she had a 55 horsepower Atlas Imperial Diesel at 350 rpms. The boats were used for towing logs and small oil barges in the South sound. Dad had the tugs on consignment and the owner cautioned dad when he showed the tugs to be sure to come at high tide so that they would be floating and not high and dry as where he had them tied it was typical south sound – that is, shallow. Dad wrote Mr. McClintock of Oregon Shipbuilding in Portland about the two tugs. The ISKUM was listed at $5,000, and the SKOOKUM at $9,000. He sold the SKOOKUM to them and I have a letter dated June 26,1942 where dad had sold the ISKUM and she was doing just fine on her new job. I don’t know who bought her but the bible shows her in SE Alaska ownership. Pioneer Towing bought her later and she went back and forth with logs and gravel scows for years. Pioneer put a big Cat in her around 300 horsepower, if I remember correctly, which made her really fast and she won Class C Tugboat Races in Seattle Harbor. One hot summer day she went by here with a couple of loaded gravel scows and I guess the high heat alarm didn’t go off and she fried her big Cat. I think that was the end of her as she and the RESOLUTE were disposed of in the Manson burning pit on West Pass in 1967.

 

 

LETTER FROM OWNER OF THE ISKUM AND SKOOKUM TO DOC FREEMAN.

LETTER FROM OWNER OF THE ISKUM AND SKOOKUM TO DOC FREEMAN.

 

 

ATLAS IMPERIAL ADD.

ATLAS IMPERIAL AD.

 

ISKUM

“ISKUM”

 

ISKUM IN SOUTH SOUND.

“ISKUM “IN SOUTH SOUND.

 

 

ISKUM ON THE OUTSIDE LAYING NEXT TO AMY, VIRGINIA II IN BACKGROUND.

“ISKUM” ON THE OUTSIDE LAYING NEXT TO “AMY,” “VIRGINIA II” IN BACKGROUND.

 

ISKUM IN SEATTLE TUGOAT RACE.

“ISKUM” IN SEATTLE TUGOAT RACE.

 

TUG KETCHIKAN:  Official #204442  Ol.s; 17 tons Gross and 12 Tons Net. Registered Length 51.6 feet;  Beam 12.4 feet; Depth of hold 4 feet. Built in Ballard in 1906. Power 120 horsepower Waukesha-Hesselman VIGILANT Model, with a 3:1 reduction gear, engine speed 1200 rpms. Freeman & Gibson were high bidder on ST-330 from the United States Maritime Commission on September 10, 1946. I believe that we sold her to Paul Hamilton. Former owners were Bellingham Tug & Barge and Delta V Smith in Olympia.

 

 

KETCHIKAN ENGINE ADD. PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE,

KETCHIKAN ENGINE AD IN THE PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT MAGAZINE.

 

 

KETCHIKAN LAYING AT McCARTYS MARINE WHICH IS NOW THUNDERBIRD.

“KETCHIKAN” LAYING AT McCARTY’S MARINE WHICH IS NOW THUNDERBIRD.

 

ROSE IN FOREGROUND KETCHIKAN AT TOP. BOB HAD THE ROSE TORE APART PUTTING IN A 6=71 GM.

“ROSE” IN FOREGROUND “KETCHIKAN” AT TOP. BOB SHREWSBURY HAD THE “ROSE” TORN APART PUTTING IN A 6-71 GM.

 

TUG  KLATAWA: Official #: 210245; Ol.s; 23 Gross Tons; 18 Net Tons. Registered length 50.2 feet; Beam 15.8 feet; Depth of hold 4.8 feet. She was built on Shaw Island in the San Juans.

Doc bought her on November 9, 1955 from the estate of Ray E. Stickler or from his wife, Jenny Stickler and sold her on Feburary 16, 1956 to Ken Thibert of Anacortes who owned the DUSTY, a surplus MT tug and the NONA a small tug.

The KLATAWA had many owners my Merchant Vessels of the United States doesn’t go far enough back only to 1934.

1934:  She belonged to Gilkey Brothers of Anacortes and she had 90 horsepower. I thought that it was an Atlas.

1936: She belonged to Milt Willie at Olympia Towing and shows 90 horsepower.

1946: She still belonged to Olympia Towing.

1951: She belonged to my friend, Ray E. Stickler, and it shows 165 horsepower. I believe Olympia Towing put the Jimmy in her out of the sunk LEONINE which had a 4 3/8 to 1 reduction gear. I remember talking to Gordon Willie and he rebuilt the low house into a house like the NEMAH had which was quite roomy. In fact the two boats looked very similar. I got fooled once: I was going down the ship canal with my tug JERKMORE and I passed the NEMAH with a log tow and when I got to the locks here was the NEMAH tied up waiting for the small locks! Except, on closer inspection, it was the KLATAWA.  I thought that I had been drinking or lost my mind. Gordon did a really good job building the house. A few years later I was racing against Gordon and his wife, Doris, in the Olympia Tugboat Races and we became the best of friends.

 1956: The book shows O.H. Doc Freeman as owner.

 1957:  Dad had sold her to Ken Thibert.

Ray E. Stickler was an old time boater and he worked for us quite a bit and was very responsible. He brought the 90 foot WESTWARD up the coast from San Francisco when we bought her surplus. He bought the tugs VAMOOSE and ROSE and ran them up the coast from the Willapa. He used to be Captain of some of the really big yachts in the area. He and my brother-in- law, Pat Stoppelman, got a contract to tow logs out of Deep Bay on Lummi Island for Stimpson Mill in Ballard. Pat had the WESTERN STAR which had a 100 horsepower CO FAIRBANKS-MORSE so they were evenly matched. I got to help them tow the rafts thru the Locks with the JERKMORE -just a little underpowered and overloaded. I was once bringing a six section piece and I guess I wasn’t getting my raft out of the way fast enough and Foss was bringing out some huge barge so the SANDRA FOSS came over and put a line on my raft and pushed me up the channel so that I was out of the way. Boy that went quick with her 750 horsepower Enterprise.

I also helped Ray and the KLATAWA through Thatcher Pass to Alice Bight and then through Deception Pass with the JERKMORE with her heavy log tow. He could tow it alright once he got thru the Pass and was on the inside in summer. I got him thru the Pass and Pacific Towboats GOVERNOR was headed out of the pass for Anacortes with eight sections of logs on the slack tide but he was a little late and it started to flood on him so I pulled with him for about a half an hour to get him just clear of the flood tide which was building every minute.

On the way out of the Pass - that is going west – if you don’t get through far enough to where the flood is with you, you go sailing right back through and you have to switch ends. It’s kinda risky coming out on the last of the ebb because your timing has to be right on. If I had not been there, he would not have made it and he would be following the KLATAWA. The problem is if you are second or third boat at the Pass, the current keeps building and pushing on you and your tail boats have to have enough power to keep your tow off the rocks or Gobler’s Nob.  What happens is the second log tow through the Pass has more current on its tow than the first tow and the second tug has to veer off to the north to avoid running over the first tow. The pass is a hairy place. The Rogers brothers kept two little tugs there for years to assist the log towers.

KLATAWA WITH ORIGINAL HOUSE.

“KLATAWA” WITH ORIGINAL HOUSE.

 

KLATAWA WITH THE ORANGE PAINT AT FREMONT BOAT CO. IN 1951. nOTICE THE ADVENTURESS BEHIND HER. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

“KLATAWA” WITH THE ORANGE PAINT AT FREMONT BOAT CO. IN 1951. NOTICE THE “ADVENTURESS” BEHIND HER. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

KLATAWA AND WESTERN STAR PULLING ON 20 SECTIONS IN SARATOGA PASSAGE. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“KLATAWA” AND “WESTERN STAR” PULLING ON 20 SECTIONS IN SARATOGA PASSAGE. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

1952-53 KLATAWA & JERKMORE LAYING AT THATCHER BAY. LAUREN HUCKINS,RAY STICKLER AND JENNY STICKLER. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

1952-53 “KLATAWA” AND  “JERKMORE” LAYING AT THATCHER BAY. LAUREN HUCKINS, RAY STICKLER AND JENNY STICKLER.   MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

1952-53 JERKMORE TAILBOAT FOR KLATAWA'S LOG TOW GOING THRU DECEPTION PASS. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

1952-53   ” JERKMORE” TAILBOAT FOR “KLATAWA’S” LOG TOW GOING THRU DECEPTION PASS.   MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

KLATAWA WITH LOG TOW OFF STIMPSON MILL HEADED FOR LOCKS.

“KLATAWA” WITH LOG TOW OFF STIMPSON MILL HEADED FOR LOCKS.

 

KLATAWA OFF MAGNOLIA BLUFF RUNNING LITE.

“KLATAWA” OFF MAGNOLIA BLUFF RUNNING LITE.

 

KLATAWA AND JIM HUCKINS 1993. LOU MILLER PHOTO.

“KLATAWA” AND JIM HUCKINS 1993. LOU MILLER PHOTO.

 

DOC & MAY ON KLATAWA. MARK FREEMAN PNOTO.

DOC & MAY ON “KLATAWA.” MARK FREEMAN PNOTO.

 

NEMAH  GORDON WILLIE MADE KLATAWA'S NEW HOUSE LOOK LIKE NEMAH. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

“NEMAH”.   GORDON WILLIE MADE “KLATAWA’S”  NEW HOUSE LOOK LIKE THE “NEMAH”. I HAD HER FOR SALE .  MARK FREEMAN

 

 

 

TUG KUMALONG: Coast Guard #: 30R300. Length 30 feet; Power 317 Buda Diesel with a reduction gear. She is one of three tugs the Grandy Boat Company on Westlake built of that type during WW II for the U. S. Army. They were semi-tunnel, shallow draft with a monkey rudder and she swung a 28″ x 29″ propeller; later on her she had steel plate added over the wood hull and a steel house put on.

We also owned the STOKER and the third one is the CEDAR which was owned at one time by Bob Shrewsbury, Sr.  Dad bought and sold her twice. I remember running her on different jobs for dad and painting her bottom. Our records show dad buying the KUMALONG at a U.S. Marshals sale. Dad sold her to Cy Devenny on December 4, 1956.  Cy must have sold her because I have a bill of sale showing dad buying her again from a Richard M. Braatan on April 2, 1959 and selling her thru Fremont Boat Co., (that was me by then), on Nov. 22, 1960 to J. A. Parks. Dad always had use for these boats right up to the day that they sold then we would start a new project. What fun. I remember towing the small barge that held our steel pilot house off the ALASKA STANDARD that is still on top of our office building. Louie Swartz was a scrapper and owned Railwater Terminal in Ballard and he scrapped the tanker ALASKA STANDARD but saved the pilot house. We craned it off – all 20 tons of it - trucked it down to our Northlake Yard and built an addition to the Doc Freeman’s marine store that was specially built to hold it. It became Dad and Mom’s office.

 

"KUMALONG" ALONGSIDE "ARGOS."  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“KUMALONG” ALONGSIDE “ARGOS.” MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

KUMALONG OUT OF WATER NPOTICE THE SLIGHT TUNNEL. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

KUMALONG OUT OF WATER. NOTICE THE SLIGHT TUNNEL. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

"KUMALONG" WORKING AT OUR NORTHLAKE YARD BY THE GAS PLANT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“KUMALONG” WORKING AT OUR NORTHLAKE YARD BY THE GAS PLANT.   MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

"KUMALONG"IN DRYDOCK MARK IS PAINTING ON HER. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

“KUMALONG” IN DRYDOCK.  MARK IS PAINTING ON HER.    DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"KUMALONG" RUNNING LITE. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

“KUMALONG” RUNNING LITE. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

TUG LEWISTON: Washington DOL#: WN 9262 B; Length 34 feet 6 inches; Beam 9 foot; Draft 2 feet 5 inches. Power was two Chrysler Royal 143 horsepower gas engines with 1 ½ to 1 reduction gears; Propeller size 20” diameter x 19” pitch. She was built by Gunderson Brothers in 1942 at Portland, Oregon.

Doc was high bidder on April 3, 1961 at the U. S. ARMY ENGINEERS in Portland, Oregon. I am sure that dad got her to Longview and lifted her out of water with the big stiff leg and set her on a truck and a few hours later she was afloat in Lake Union at Fremont Boat Company.

She almost drove us completely around the bend. One engine would get its full rpm’s and the other engine was 700 rpm’s slower. We did everything that you could think of and finally we chalked the coupling on each engine and found that some body had replaced the 1 ½ to 1 reduction gear with a direct drive 1 to 1. Same housing… boy did that take a lot of time and money to figure out. We cleaned her all up and painted her in company colors just the same as we use now except dad liked dark green decks not gray. We had her for sale, of course, and along comes J. E. Work Inc. inquiring if we had any small tugs for lease there is only one answer to that, yes!  They had won a contract with the City of Seattle to clean out the weeds in Green Lake and needed a small tug. We loaded her on a flat bed truck, drove up Stone Way Avenue, got to Greenlake and backed the truck out into the water and off floated the LEWISTON. She was working in Greenlake for two or three months. One of our employees, Harold Hill, was driving around Greenlake and almost had a accident because he was so surprised by seeing our tug. I guess we forgot to tell him. I wasn’t there when they took the boat out of water but somehow they broke the back door so they flooded the engine room when the boat started out of water and the angle increased. Lucky that it was fresh water , so we just flushed the engines and cleaned and dried everything, changed oil and they were running again. The back door had to be rebuilt and it cost a total of $180 to build a new door and clean up the engine room. They were different dollars then. We got $40.00 dollars a day for a bare boat charter. In June of 1962 I sold her to Charles Miller and she went right back to the Columbia River.

 

"LEWISTON" UP FOR BID IN PORTLAND. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

“LEWISTON” UP FOR BID IN PORTLAND. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

"LEWISTON" FOR SALE. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

“LEWISTON” FOR SALE. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"LEWISTON" WORKING AT OUR NORTHLAKE BOAT YARD.DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

“LEWISTON” WORKING AT OUR NORTHLAKE BOAT YARD.  DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"LEWISTON" RUNNING LITE BURNING WAY TO MUCH GAS IN THOSE DAYS IT WAS 25 CENTS A GALLON. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

“LEWISTON” RUNNING LITE BURNING WAY TOO MUCH GAS.  IN THOSE DAYS IT WAS 25 CENTS A GALLON.    DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

"LEWISTON" FROTHING THE WATER. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

“LEWISTON” FROTHING THE WATER. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"LEWISTON' ON THE TRUCK HEADED FOR GREEN LAKE. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“LEWISTON’ ON THE TRUCK HEADED FOR GREEN LAKE. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

"LEWISTON" JUST GOING INTO GREEN LAKE.  APRIL 1962 MARK  FREEMAN PHOTO.

“LEWISTON” JUST GOING INTO GREENLAKE.             APRIL, 1962    MARK
FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

 

 

TUG MANILA:  Official #: 211412; Ga.s; Registered length 40 feet; Beam 11.5 feet; Depth of hold 4.5 feet.  14 Gross tons and 6 Net tons. Built in 1913 at Seattle, Washington. Power was a 70 horsepower Hall Scott gas engine with reduction gear. I always wondered about her name - possibly a Spanish American War Veteran from the Phillipine Campaign named her. My uncle, Alvin Freeman, was a soldier in that war and cousin Alvin was named for him. Doc showed her for sale to Art Anderson of the Intercoastal Packing Co. on January 28, 1941 at a price of $1,750.00.  At that time Jack Trafton of Robinson Fisheries owned her. I bought her after I got off active duty with the Coast Guard but that’s another chapter.

"MANILA" WHEN SHE HAD HER 50 HORSEPOWER CORLISS GAS CINGINE.

“MANILA” WHEN SHE HAD HER 50 HORSEPOWER CORLISS GAS ENGINE.

 

 

 

MANILA STORY

 

 

"MANILA" OUT OF WATER.

“MANILA” OUT OF WATER.

 

"MANILA" BOW SHOT.

“MANILA” BOW SHOT.

CURRENT AFFAIRS, ALMOST.

 

MARGIE  THE BOSS. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

MARGIE THE BOSS. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TOM DAVIS, CAPT. MARK AND CAPT. ERIK. TOM DROPPED BY TO GIVE ME SOME CROWLEY PATCHS AND TO HAVE A GREAT BS SESSION.TOM AND US GO WAY BACK.  MARGID FREEMAN PHOTO.

TOM DAVIS, CAPT. MARK AND CAPT. ERIK. TOM DROPPED BY TO GIVE ME SOME CROWLEY PATCHES AND TO HAVE A GREAT BS SESSION.TOM AND US GO WAY BACK. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

SANDY & AL WYLIE DROPPED BY FOR ONE OF MY BIRTHDAY LUNCHES. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

SANDY & AL WYLIE DROPPED BY FOR ONE OF MY BIRTHDAY LUNCHES. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

AL & SANDY,  MARGIE & CAPT. MARK.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

AL & SANDY, MARGIE & CAPT. MARK.       ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

 

ON-TIME AND OUR LATEST PROJECT THE GATOR.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“ON-TIME” AND OUR LATEST PROJECT THE “GATOR”. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

BILL GARDEN SURE DESIGNED NEAT POATS. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

BILL GARDEN SURE DESIGNED NEAT BOATS. IN FACT HE DESIGNED BOTH THE “ON-TIME” AND THE “GATOR! MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CHUCK FOWLER AND I BOTH HAD A BIRTHDAY PARTY IN OUR OFFICE, WHAT FUN. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

CHUCK FOWLER AND I BOTH HAD A BIRTHDAY PARTY IN OUR OFFICE, WHAT FUN. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

MARGIE & MARK, KAE PATERSON,CHUCK & KARLA. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

MARGIE & MARK, KAE PATERSON,CHUCK & KARLA FOWLER.     ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

KARLA FOWLER PAINTED THIS NEAT PAINTING OF MARGIE & I AND THE ON-TIME. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

KARLA FOWLER PAINTED THIS NEAT PAINTING OF MARGIE & I ALONGSIDE THE ON-TIME.   MARGIE FREEMAN PHO

 

BESIDES THE GREAT PAINTING I GOT AN EMBOSSED COAST GUARD EMBLEM ,WOW. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

BESIDES THE GREAT PAINTING I GOT AN EMBOSSED COAST GUARD EMBLEM ,WOW. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CHUCK WEARING HIS NEW OLD AIR FORCE CAP AND INSPECTING HIS TEXACO TUGBOAT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

CHUCK WEARING HIS NEW OLD AIR FORCE CAP AND INSPECTING HIS TEXACO TUGBOAT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

OTTO LOGGERS FROM NW SEAPORT DROPPED BY IN THE MIDDLE OF THE FESTIVITYS AND SO WE CUT HIM A PEICE OF CAKE AND HE JOINED IOU PARTY. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

OTTO LOGGERS FROM NW SEAPORT DROPPED BY IN THE MIDDLE OF THE FESTIVITIES AND SO WE CUT HIM A PIECE OF CAKE AND HE JOINED OUR PARTY. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

WE ALSO HAD A BIRTHDAY PARTY FOR MARINA MAY. SHE GOT A SCHOOL AID THATS WHAT SHE IS HANGING ON TO. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

WE ALSO HAD A BIRTHDAY PARTY FOR MARINA MAY. SHE GOT A SCHOOL AID (LAPTOP) THAT’S WHAT SHE IS HANGING ON TO. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

NOW FOR SOME SERIOUS STUFF….YOU DON’T REALLY BELIEVE THAT DO YOU?

ANOTHER NEW FLOATING BRIDGE SECTION. wE HAVE SEEN 4 TOTAL 3 CAME IN ON OPENING DAY WEEKEND.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

ANOTHER NEW FLOATING BRIDGE SECTION. WE HAVE SEEN 4 TOTAL 3 CAME IN ON OPENING DAY WEEKEND. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

SOLANO PUAHING HARD. a CALIFORNIA TUG CO. WON THE CONTRACT ON THE NEW BRIDGE AND THEY TOWED A BARGE IN WITH 3 GIANT TUGS ON IT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

SOLANO PUSHING HARD. A CALIFORNIA TUG CO. WON THE CONTRACT ON THE NEW BRIDGE AND THEY TOWED A BARGE IN WITH 3 GIANT TUGS ON IT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

DUNLAPS "VULCAN" IN DRYDOCK AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

DUNLAPS “VULCAN” IN DRYDOCK AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE" WITH "ALASKA VOYAGER" ALONGSIDE HEADED FOR NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” WITH “ALASKA VOYAGER” ALONGSIDE HEADED FOR NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

"DIXIE" & "ALASKA VOYAGER"  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” & “ALASKA VOYAGER”.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"GENERAL LEE"  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“GENERAL LEE”.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

ANOTHER BORTHDAY PARTY THIS TIME BRAD SCHMIDT CAME.  MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

ANOTHER BIRTHDAY PARTY THIS TIME BRAD SCHMIDT CAME. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

OLD TIME FRIEND SCOTT SCHOCH DROPPED BY ON HIS WAY TO WORK. hH IS CAPTAIN OF THE DUNLAP TUG :SWINOMISH" AND WILL BE TGOWING LOGS AND STICKS AND DUSTYS FOR TWO WEEKS, MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

OLD TIME FRIEND SCOTT SCHOCH DROPPED BY ON HIS WAY TO WORK. HE IS CAPTAIN OF THE DUNLAP TUG “SWINOMISH” AND WILL BE TOWING LOGS AND STICKS AND DUSTYS FOR TWO WEEKS.   MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TOM BULSON HAD A BIRTHDAY TO. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

TOM BULSON HAD A BIRTHDAY TOO. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TOMS BIRTHDAY PARTY FM LEFT, MARK & MARGIE,   TOM BULSON, OUR MISS BLUE AND ERIK

TOMS BIRTHDAY PARTY FROM LEFT, MARK & MARGIE, TOM BULSON, OUR MISS BLUE AND ERIK.

 

DENNIS & SANDRA HAVEN DROPPED BY TO SAY HELLO. HE SENT ME SEVERAL PHOTOS OF WHEN HE WORKED FOR BOYER IN 1955-56. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

DENNIS & SANDRA HAVEN DROPPED BY TO SAY HELLO. HE SENT ME SEVERAL PHOTOS OF WHEN HE WORKED FOR BOYER IN 1955-56. IN ALASKA.  MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

ANOTHER BIRTHDAY PART THIS TIME IT WAS FOR HEIDI ERIKS WIFE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

ANOTHER BIRTHDAY PARTY; THIS TIME IT WAS FOR HEIDI, ERIKS WIFE. ON THE LEFT MARINA MAY THEN HEIDI AND TOM BULSON.  MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE" SHIFTING "MYSTERY BAY" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” SHIFTING “MYSTERY BAY”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE AND GENERAL LEE" SHIFTING "LEGACY" AT FISHERMAN'S TERMINAL. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE”AND “GENERAL LEE”  SHIFTING “LEGACY” AT FISHERMEN’S TERMINAL. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

'foss 300' LIFTING OLD DRYDOCK FROM WILSON MARINE. WE THEN TOOK THEM TO THE OLD MARITIME SHIPYARD SITE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“FOSS 300″  LIFTING OLD DRYDOCK FROM WILSON MARINE. WE THEN TOOK THEM TO THE OLD MARITIME SHIPYARD SITE AND UNLOADED THE DRYDOCK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE" GETTING READY TO MAKE UP  TO DOG BOAT "HUSKY"  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” GETTING READY TO MAKE UP TO DOG BOAT “HUSKY”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

HAL HURLENS TUG "NOREEN" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

HAL HURLENS’ TUG “NOREEN”.   ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

UNDOCKING BIG YACHT AT DELTA. TUGS "DIXIE & GENERAL LEE" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

UNDOCKING BIG YACHT AT DELTA. TUGS “DIXIE” & “GENERAL LEE”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

HERE'S WHAT THAT YACHT LOOKS LIKE. DONT TOUCH ANYTHING A TIGHT LINE SHIFT ALL THE WAY. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

HERE’S WHAT THAT YACHT LOOKS LIKE. DONT TOUCH ANYTHING… A TIGHT LINE SHIFT ALL THE WAY. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

THE NEW 16TH SOUTH BRIDGE ACROSS THE DUWAMISH. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

THE NEW 16TH SOUTH BRIDGE ACROSS THE DUWAMISH. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

SOM OF BOYERS BOATS, THE "LOIS H"  IS LAYING ALONGSIDE THE "KIRSTEN H" AND AT HER STERN THE SMALL TUG IS THE "KILLER BEE" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

SOME OF BOYERS BOATS, THE “LOIS H”
IS LAYING ALONGSIDE THE “KIRSTEN H” AND AT HER STERN THE SMALL TUG IS THE “KILLER BEE”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

THR "NANCY M" EX SHELLEY FOSS " ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

THR “NANCY M” (EX-”SHELLEY FOSS”). ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

KIRBY TUG "PACIFIC WOLF"  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

KIRBY TUG “PACIFIC WOLF”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

STABBERTS "OCEAN PIONEER" AND THE "DIXIE.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

STABBERTS “OCEAN PIONEER” AND THE “DIXIE”. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

LAYING AT STABBERTS FM LEFT "OCEAN PIONEER, VIKING & DISCOVERY STAR" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

LAYING AT STABBERTS FROM LEFT: “OCEAN PIONEER”, “VIKING” & “DISCOVERY STAR”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE" PUTTING "CHELSEA K" IN THE YACHT HOLE AT STABBERTS WOW. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” PUTTING “CHELSEA K” IN THE YACHT HOLE AT STABBERTS. WOW. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"CHELSEA K" OUT IN THE OPEN.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“CHELSEA K” OUT IN THE OPEN. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE" MAKING UP TO "VIKING" AT STABBERTS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” MAKING UP TO “VIKING” AT STABBERTS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

ASSISTED "VIKING" TO BALLARD OIL. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

ASSISTED “VIKING” TO STABBERTS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE " SHIFTING "SEADAWN" INTO DRYDOCK AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE ” SHIFTING “SEADAWN” INTO DRYDOCK AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"GENERAL LEE" PUSHING "SEADAWN" INTO #9 AT  LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“GENERAL LEE” PUSHING “SEADAWN” INTO #9 AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CLEAN OCEAN" LAYING AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. ERIKFREEMAN PHOTO.

“CLEAN OCEAN” LAYING AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"NIOLO" A KIRBY TUG LAYING AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“NIOLO”, A KIRBY TUG, LAYING AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

DIXIE" SHIFTING "AKUTAN"ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” SHIFTING “AKUTAN”.   ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE"SHIFTING "FOSS 300" TO PACIFIC FISHERMAN. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” SHIFTING “FOSS 300″ TO PACIFIC FISHERMEN. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

"DIXIE" SHIFTING DEADLIEST CATCH CRAB BOAT "NORTHWESTERN"  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” SHIFTING DEADLIEST CATCH CRAB BOAT “NORTHWESTERN”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"OWL" EX CANADIAN TUG "LOUISE IDAHO" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“OWL” (EX-CANADIAN TUG “LOUISE IDAHO”). ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CRAB BOATR "RONDYS" GREAT BOW TO MEET IN THE FOG.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

CRAB BOAT “RONDYS”.  GREAT BOW TO MEET IN THE FOG.    ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

 

 

OUR MAN ON WHIDBEY ISLAND, STAN WILLHIGHT, SENT ANOTHER GREAT BATCH OF PHOTOS.  THANKS STAN.

"ROVER" AT PORT TOWNSEND 3-21-1990.

“ROVER” AT PORT TOWNSEND 3-21-1990.

 

12-13-1989 DUNLAPA "SAMISH" AT DECEPTION PASS.

12-13-1989 DUNLAP “SAMISH” AT DECEPTION PASS.

 

12-13-1989 DUNLAP'A "SAMISH" AT THE PASS.

12-13-1989 DUNLAP’S “SAMISH” AT THE PASS

 

12-20-1989 STAN DAHLS "HEADWIND" HE TOLD ME THAT HE NAMED IT THAT BECAUSE ALL HE EVER GOT WAS HEADWINDS.

12-20-1989 FRED DAHL’S “HEADWIND”. HE TOLD ME THAT HE NAMED IT THAT BECAUSE ALL HE EVER GOT WAS HEAD WINDS.

 

2-22-1990 CANADIAN TUG MALASPINA STRAITS.

2-22-1990 CANADIAN TUG MALASPINA STRAITS.

 

 

OUR MAN AND WOMAN IN COOS BAY, BOB & GINNA RICHARDSON, SENT ME SOME PHOTOS AT THE FIRST OF THE YEAR OF CAPT. CHRIS COMMONS TOWING A DRY DOCK FROM, I THINK, SAN DIEGO TO PERU WITH AN EX-SAUSE TUG THE “ROUGHNECK” –  OWNED THEN BY JERRY ANDERSON OF COOS BAY. JERRY WAS A PILOT AT COOS BAY AND HAS OWNED BIG TUGS. THE “ROUGHNECK” WAS AN EX-ARMY LT.  I HOPE I GOT ALL THIS CORRECT IF NOT I CAN ALWAYS BLAME BOB FOR NOT GIVING ME ENOUGH INFO. HA.

 

JANUARY 2014 HELPER TUG IN SAN DIEGO.

JANUARY 2014 HELPER TUG IN SAN DIEGO.

 

"ROUGHNECK WITH DRYDOCK IN TOW LEAVING SAN DIEGO.

“ROUGHNECK” WITH DRYDOCK IN TOW LEAVING SAN DIEGO.

 

AT SEA OF COURSE DRYDOCK WILL NOT FOLLOW.

AT SEA OF COURSE THE DRYDOCK WILL NOT FOLLOW.

 

THR ROUGHNECK FEB. 2013

THE “ROUGHNECK” FEB. 2013

 

 

CAPT. CHRIS COMMONS GOING THRU CUSTOMS AT PAITA, PERU. I BET THAT WASNT ANY FUN.

CAPT. CHRIS COMMONS GOING THRU CUSTOMS AT PAITA, PERU. I BET THAT WASN’T ANY FUN.

 

 

GIANT SEINE SKIFF OFF TUNA CLIPPER.

GIANT SEINE SKIFF OFF TUNA CLIPPER.

 

SCOTT SCHOCK, OUR MAN IN COSMOPOLIS, STOPPED BY AND GAVE ME A VERY LARGE BATCH OF TUGBOAT PHOTOS. SCOTT RUNS TUGS FOR DUNLAP AND DOES THE TOUGHEST TOWING OF ALL: LOGS. YOU HAVE TO BE IN JUST THE RIGHT SPOT ALL THE TIME, NO MISTAKES ALLOWED, AND YOU ARE AT THE MERCY OF THE WEATHER; YOUR AVERAGE SPEED IS KINDA LIKE A MILE AND ONE HALF AN HOUR. SO, WHEN YOU START ACROSS BOUNDARY PASS YOU ARE REALLY EARNING YOUR KEEP. THINK ABOUT IT THE NEXT TIME YOU ARE ZIPPING ACROSS RUNNING LITE.

 

HERCULES  WAS BUILT FOR CROWLEY BUT SHE MUST BE A REAL LOG TOWER WITH HER POWER.

HERCULES WAS BUILT FOR CROWLEY BUT SHE MUST BE A REAL LOG TOWER WITH HER POWER.

 

DUNLAPS "HERCULES" MAKING UP TO A BUNDLE TOW.

DUNLAP’S “HERCULES” MAKING UP TO A BUNDLE TOW.

 

INSIDE THE PILOT HOUSE OF THE "HERCULES" IN THE OLD DAYS THERE WAS A STEERING WHEEL A COMPASS AND A ENGINE ORDER TELEGRAPH OR A SET OF BELLS WHICH INCLUDED A GONG AND A JINGLE BELL.

INSIDE THE PILOT HOUSE OF THE “HERCULES”.  IN THE OLD DAYS THERE WAS A STEERING WHEEL, A COMPASS AND A ENGINE ORDER TELEGRAPH OR A SET OF BELLS WHICH INCLUDED A GONG AND A JINGLE BELL.

 

"HERCULES"

“HERCULES”

 

OUR MAN IN FREMONT, CAPT. TOM BULSON, GAVE ME 500 PHOTOS THE OTHER DAY AND I JUST KEEP GOING THRU, THEM PICKING OUT THE GOOD ONES – OF COURSE THE PROBLEM IS THAT THEY ARE ALL GOOD, NOW WHAT DO I DO?

HOUSEBARGE ON THE TOW LINE JUST CLEARING THE FREMONT BRIDGE.

HOUSEBARGE ON THE TOW LINE JUST CLEARING THE FREMONT BRIDGE

 

WONDERFULL OLDTIME PHOT OF "MCALLISTER BROS." AND THE "BESS A GREAT OLD STEAM TUG.

WONDERFULL OLDTIME PHOTO OF “MCALLISTER BROS.” AND THE “BESS” A GREAT OLD STEAM TUG.

 

"MILWAUKEE" RAILROAD TUG TOWED CAR BARGES ON PUGET SOUND FOR YEARS. I THINK IT WAS THE LAST STEAM TUG ON THE SOUND.

“MILWAUKEE” RAILROAD TUG TOWED CAR BARGES ON PUGET SOUND FOR YEARS. I THINK IT WAS THE LAST STEAM TUG ON THE SOUND.

 

"CLAUDIA FOSS LOOKS  LIKE SHE WAS JUST LAUNCHED. I THINK THAT IS THE "DUNCAN FOSS" TOWING HER.?

“CLAUDIA FOSS” - LOOKS LIKE SHE WAS JUST LAUNCHED. I THINK THAT IS THE “DUNCAN FOSS” TOWING HER?

 

"GENERAL LEE" PUSHING ON THE BOW OF THE BLUE PACIFIC.  THANKS TOM.

“GENERAL LEE” PUSHING ON THE BOW OF THE BLUE PACIFIC. THANKS TOM.

 

 

LINDA EVANS SENT ME THE LAST PHOTOS OF THE “CHICKAMAUGA” BEING DESTROYED ON THE HARD IN PORT TOWNSEND.

 

SO SAD WHAT AN ENDING FOR THE FIRST DIESEL TUG IN THE UNITED STATES. WE BETTER ALL GET BEHIND THE REBUILDING OF THE "ARTHUR FOSS" SO SHE DOES NOT BECOME A DUMPSTER TUG.

SO SAD WHAT AN ENDING FOR THE FIRST DIESEL TUG IN THE UNITED STATES. WE BETTER ALL GET BEHIND THE REBUILDING OF THE “ARTHUR FOSS” SO SHE DOES NOT BECOME A DUMPSTER TUG.

 

 

POOR OLD BOAT.

POOR OLD BOAT.

 

SHE SURE LOOKS LONSOME AND FORLORN.

SHE SURE LOOKS LONESOME AND FORLORN.

””’

NOT A FRIEND IN THE WORLD.

NOT A FRIEND IN THE WORLD.

 

CHICKAMAUGA IS JUST A MEMORY NOW. THANKS FOR ALL THE PHOTOS LINDA.

“CHICKAMAUGA” IS JUST A MEMORY NOW. THANKS FOR ALL THE PHOTOS LINDA

 

125 YEAR PIN

sSEA & SHORES "PETER W" TOWING HIS BK DECK BARGE PAST OUR HOUSEBOAT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

SEA & SHORES “PETER H” TOWING HIS BK DECK BARGE PAST OUR HOUSEBOAT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

"VESTERAALEN BETING TOWED TO NORTHLAKE SHPYARD BY TUGS "DIXIE AND GENERAL LEE"MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“VESTERAALEN BEING TOWED TO NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD BY TUGS “DIXIE”AND “GENERAL LEE”.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE AND GENERAL LEE" WITH "VESTERAALEN"  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE”AND “GENERAL LEE” WITH “VESTERAALEN”. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

MARGIE SHE 'S THE BOSS. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

MARGIE: SHE ‘S THE BOSS. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"ACANIA" BIG YACHT FROM CALIFORNIA OUT FOR OPENING DAY. THEY EVEN GAVE US A HAND SALUTE MAYBE BECAUSE WE WERE FLYING OUR FLAG. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

“ACANIA” BIG YACHT FROM CALIFORNIA OUT FOR OPENING DAY. THEY EVEN GAVE US A HAND SALUTE – MAYBE BECAUSE WE WERE FLYING OUR FLAG. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

WE HAD A BIRTHDAY PARTY FOR BONNIE. MARGI FREEMAN PHOTO.

WE HAD A BIRTHDAY PARTY FOR BONNIE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"NANCY M" PUSHING ON ANOTHER BRIDGE SECTION. ISNT SHE A BEAUT.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“NANCY M” PUSHING ON ANOTHER BRIDGE SECTION. ISN’T SHE A BEAUT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CALIFORNIA TUG "TAURUS" TOWING ANPOTHER BRIDGE SECTION.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

CALIFORNIA TUG “TAURUS” TOWING ANOTHER BRIDGE SECTION. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

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"WILDERNESS EXPLORER" BEING SHIFTED TO FUEL DOCK BY "DIXIE & GENERAL LEE" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“WILDERNESS EXPLORER” BEING SHIFTED TO FUEL DOCK BY “DIXIE” & “GENERAL LEE”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"GENERAL LEE" ASSISTING "JOHN BRIX INTO A TIGHT MOORAGE SPACE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“GENERAL LEE” ASSISTING “JOHN BRIX”  INTO A TIGHT MOORAGE SPACE.   ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"ACANIA" LAYING AT STABBERT YACHT MOORAGE ON COMMODORE WAY. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“ACANIA” LAYING AT SALMON BAY MARINE CENTER. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE" SHIFTING "NORTHWESTERN FOR TV COMMERICIAL. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” SHIFTING “NORTHWESTERN” FOR A TV COMMERICIAL. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE" WITH "BLUE ATTU" ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” WITH “BLUE ATTU”.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

WE HAVE BEEN SHIFTING THE "SARFARI ENDEAVOUR"TO THE FUEL DOCK, ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

WE HAD BEEN SHIFTING THE “SARFARI ENDEAVOUR” TO THE FUEL DOCK.  ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

70 FOOT YACHT TIED TO TJHE LOG BOOM FOR OPENING DAY NEEDED A TOW SUNDAY AFTER HER CONTROLS QUIT WORKING. WE TOWED HER BACK TO THE NORTH END OF MERCER ISLAND. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

70 FOOT YACHT TIED TO THE LOG BOOM FOR OPENING DAY NEEDED A TOW SUNDAY AFTER HER CONTROLS QUIT WORKING. WE TOWED HER BACK TO THE NORTH END OF MERCER ISLAND. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE" AND "FOSS 300" PICKING UP PILOT HOUSE FOR NEW FIRE BOAT (2) ARE BEING BUILT AT FOSS SHIPYARD. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” AND “FOSS 300″ PICKING UP A PILOT HOUSE AT KVICHAK FOR THE TWO NEW FIRE BOATS THAT ARE BEING BUILT AT FOSS SHIPYARD. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"FOSS 300" PLACING PILOT HOUSE OF NEW FIREBOAT ON TOP OF DECK HOUSE AT KVICHAK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“FOSS 300″ PLACING PILOT HOUSE OF NEW FIREBOAT ON TOP OF DECK HOUSE AT KVICHAK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

"DIXIE" AND "FOSS 300' MAKING BEACH PICKS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” AND “FOSS 300′ MAKING BEACH PICKS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

LOOK AT THE SIZE OF THE BLOCKS ON THE "FOSS 300" CRANE BARGE, THE BLOCK ON THE LEFT IS A 75 TON BLOCK AND THE ONE ON THE RIGHT IS A MEAR 15 TONS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

LOOK AT THE SIZE OF THE BLOCKS ON THE “FOSS 300″ CRANE BARGE! THE BLOCK ON THE LEFT IS A 75 TON BLOCK AND THE ONE ON THE RIGHT IS A MEAR 15 TONS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

 

"DIXIE" SHIFTING "ICY BAY"INTO DYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“DIXIE” SHIFTING “ICY BAY”INTO DRYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

"FOSS 300" MAKING PICK AT KVICHAK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

“FOSS 300″ MAKING A PICK AT KVICHAK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

 

 

 

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      Thanks to all of you who send in pictures and facts so that I can share the information one photo at a time.   Anything that you send me, I can scan and send back to you good as new.

     WANTED:

  1.  Crowley decals and cloth patches for jackets of caps.  The one I really like says “Red Stack Tugs”.

  2.  Old Cary-Davis & Puget Sound Tug & Barge Photos & advertisements.

  3.  Old cannery tender & log towing photos.

  4.  We buy old tug and waterfront photos or collections and snapshots, as well as old (pre 1946) Marine Digest Magazines in any condition.

  5.  Information wanted: in an article in the Yachting magazine, it stated that Doc Freeman bought a tug named

        LEWIS II in 1943. He got her from Bellingham Tug & Barge and I can’t seem to track her down, any ideas?

  1. Want builders plate off the Coast Guard Cutter BONHAM. I gave it to Jim Valentyne after dad bought the BONHAM.

  2.  Want photos of 240 horsepower Washington diesel that powered Boyer’s SUSAN H.

All the best from:

Mark & Margie Freeman, Captains Erik & Tom, Miss Blue, Richie, The Mark Freeman Maritime Museum,

Tatoosh Towing & Salvage, Fremont Boat Co. Fremont Tugboat Co. and the three cats; Indy (Braveheart), Razz

And Batman (all three cats came from a no-kill shelter about 4 years ago,)

Please donate to the Northwest Seaport to help repair the ARTHUR FOSS you saw the pictures of the CHICKAMAUGA being dismantled in Port Townsend we sure don’t want that to happen the ARTHUR FOSS.

 

 

 

 

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CAPTAIN MARK FREEMAN’S “RUDDERLESS” APRIL 15, 2014

 

CAPT. MARK.

CAPTAIN  MARK.

 

 

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CHUCK FOWLER WAS SELECTED BY JENNIFER KILMER, THE DIRECTOR OF THE WASHINGTON STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY, ALONG WITH THE STATE HISTORY MUSEUM TO RECEIVE THE 2013 ROBERT GRAY MEDAL.  THIS IS THE HIGHEST HONOR PRESENTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR “DISTINGUISHED AND LONG -TERM CONTRIBUTIONS TO PACIFIC NORTHWEST HISTORY THROUGH DEMONSTRATED EXCELLENCE IN ONE OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING AREAS: TEACHING, WRITING, RESEARCH, HISTORIC PRESERVATION, AND SERVICE TO LOCAL HISTORICAL SOCIETIES”. NEEDLESS TO SAY CHUCK FELT DEEPLY HONORED AND THANKED ALL WHO CONTRIBUTED TO HIS ACHIEVEMENT OF THIS AWARD.

                                                                                     BRAVO ZULU CHUCK

CHUCK AND KARLA FOWLER

CHUCK AND KARLA FOWLER

 

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ARTHUR FOSS GIFT FROM NORWAY.

ARTHUR FOSS GIFT FROM NORWAY.

 

MARK & OTTO DROOLING OVER THE GIFT FROM NORWAY. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

MARK & OTTO DROOLING OVER THE GIFT FROM NORWAY. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

SAMSON MARINER ON FIRE AT FISHERMANS TERMINAL. A LOT OF DAMAGE WAS DONE. TOM BULSON PHOTO.

SAMSON MARINER ON FIRE AT FISHERMEN’S TERMINAL. A LOT OF DAMAGE WAS DONE.  TOM BULSON PHOTO.

 

“DOC” FREEMAN TUGBOAT’S.

 

Doc & Russ ONBOARD THE CRANE AFTER THEY WERE HIGH BIDDER. MAY FREEMAN PHOTO

DOC AND RUSS ONBOARD THE CRANE AFTER THEY WERE HIGH BIDDER. MAY FREEMAN PHOTO

 

 

 

My dad,”Doc”, bought and sold boats and everything else. He owned a great number of tugs – some he used in his business, others he bought and sold, some he sold on consignment. He bought and sold well over a thousand regular boats including several sailing ships, freighters, yachts, tugs, ferry boats and thousands of surplus vessels, landing barges, motor launches, skiffs, dorys, yard oilers, freighters, deck barges, Coast Guard Cutters – if it floated Doc had something to do with it. Doc had a partner, Russ Gibson, that’s where the name Freeman & Gibson came from. Dad even named his famous marine hardware store Freeman & Gibson at the start. I think that they were partners from the end of the 1930s until about 1950 when the partnership was dissolved and the store became “Doc Freeman’s”.

Dad also invested funds from his old time employees and made them share holders in the various properties that he bought. Dad also had the Alaska Junk Co. as a partner in a lot of the big boat purchases. The government would at times have bids on three big freighters opening on the same day and you had to have a bid in on all them so it took a lot of ready cash to play that game. I also owned several tugs and barges and there is a story and pictures about all of them. My brother-in-law, Pat Stoppelman, and my sister, Merry, were in the tugboat business and they had at least 25 different tugs so my work is cut out for me - as if I didn’t have enough to do.

I thought that I should start putting them down in print as I turned 80 in March. I have kept all the files that I could lay my hands on. It takes six large deep file drawers that contain dad and Pat & Merry’s and my info on our boats.  Dad died in January, 1963 when he just turned 60. Any new info that you have, please pass it on to me. Some boats we have just a photo, others are mentioned in trade journals – and we don’t have hardly any files before WW II  and almost no photos during the war except for the trade journals. Silver was used in the war effort and you could not buy any film. Lucky that Joe Williamson and Ray Krantz, both famous marine photographers and friends of mine, took photos throughout the war and I have a lot of their photos.

Fremont Boat Logo

 

Launch CATHLAMET: Doc was high bidder on the 32 foot launch CATHLAMET with the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers at Portland, Oregon on February 4, 1960. Her specs were:  Built in 1936 by Siletz boat Works, Length 32.6’, Beam 8 feet, Draft 2 feet 10 inches. Propelling Engines: two Ford v-8 marine conversions; 2:1 reduction gears;  100 horsepower, gasoline, both engines right hand.

We brought her back to Fremont Boat and put her up for sale. I fixed her up as a handy little bump boat. I went thru our collection of fenders till I found the right one for the bow and stern and put tires on the sides so that we could use her while she was for sale. I sold her two or three times and kept getting her back for non-payment of the contract. I even sold her to a fellow who started up an anti-theft program inside the Locks but I guess he could not sell enough memberships. The last time we made a deal on her was in 1964 and that one stuck. The buyers names were Louie Noeske and Art Kruise, after that I lost track of her.

ARMY CORP OF ENGINEERS LAUNCHS UP FOR BID IN PORTLAND. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

ARMY CORP OF ENGINEERS LAUNCHES UP FOR BID IN PORTLAND. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CATHLAMENT ON TRIALS . DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

CATHLAMET ON TRIALS . DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CATHLAMET. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

CATHLAMET. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CATHLAMET IN FRONT OF FREMONT BOAT BUILDING. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.
CATHLAMET IN FRONT OF FREMONT BOAT BUILDING. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

Fremont Tugboat Logo

 

DOLPHIN II PURCHASE

1948:   Doc had bought the DOLPHIN II, a 36 foot launch, on December 29, 1947 from the State of Washington for $101.01. She had sunk and lain on the bottom in Gig Harbor for a while and the hull had a twist in it that never came out. We raised her and towed her home. Dad had her rebuilt installing a 110 H.P. Lincoln Zephyr V-12 gas engine on a 2:1 Upton reduction gear and V-drive. She had a small cabin forward and engine box and a cabin top over the engine box, and of course a towbitt without a towbitt you might just as well not own her because that is what we did with her.

Dad had installed a 2 inch navy standard hand bilge pump on the bulkhead just ahead of the engine, and you had to reach over to pump it. In those days there was no 12 volt electric Rule pumps. A short time after we started using her she started leaking and not just a little. My punishment for the day was to pump her out before I went to school – 1,000 strokes in the morning and at night 1,500 strokes. Now you know why my left arm is 1 inch longer than my right arm. That went on for 3 months before I could talk my mother into having dad dry dock her and do some caulking. Dad had her out of water for a day at Lester & Franks and Jack McCrary tuned her up and no leaks for a while. We took her everywhere towing boats that dad was buying and selling. We even took her out to Dungeness Spit to tow a gillnetter back. Of course we rounded Point Wilson at night and the westerly was blowing. I did not know what that meant but soon found out. Waves coming over the bow and over the top of the house and into the stern (start pumping, Mark) and it took a long time to get shelter behind the spit. We anchored up for the rest of the night and had a little sleep in the corner of the pilot house, of course no bunks. We took off with our tow early in the morning, the sun was out and I wondered if this was the same body of water where we got our ass kicked so badly a few short hours ago. Jack taught me how to navigate and lay courses on the chart on the engine hatch. In fact, it was Jack who taught me how to run a boat and then do towing. He used to kid me that I would be doing all the towing for my dad. I never believed him but it turned out to be true. Shortly after that trip I started taking her out by myself and soon I was making landings with tows with Jack looking over my shoulder. What a thrill for an eager 14 year old.

Jack was a wonderful person. Born in 1895 in the San Juan Islands, there wasn’t much about a boat that Jack didn’t know he could build them as well as run them. He was part of the boat building firm of Franck and McCrary. An interesting story about Jack: he was packing salmon on this fish packer out of Canada to Friday Harbor during Prohibition and a couple of friends asked him to bring back a bottle for them. Jack said sure and they would stop up to his house and get their bottle whenever he would get in. Well pretty soon he was bringing back bottles for the whole town - everyone was his friend - so he had to stop that before the revenuers put him in jail for violation of the Volstead Act. That was the end of Jack’s rum running. Dad thought so much of Jack that he made him a partner in our Kinnear property on Fairview Avenue, which we built into a 52 unit house boat moorage.

DOLPHIN II was pretty quick and would cruise at 10 knots but she always looked like she was a throw away. We started on this long trip and astern of us came a boat from our yard with 3 noisy kids on it that moored at Fremont Boat Co. The fellow that owned it was our dentist. They always wanted to race our old boat and I took lots of crap from them and I knew that they were faster but maybe not today. They had six people on board and full of clothes and groceries for two weeks and they looked overloaded. She was a new Hunter cruiser twin engine and would probably do 20 mph when she was light. I asked Jack if I could take them on and open up the DOLPHIN II and show them what a fast boats stern looks like. Jack said ‘no, we have too far to run to take a chance of blowing an engine’. So I just watched them go by us and I just knew that I could take them. Oh well – lifes little lessons.

Lots of trips to the Bremerton Navy Yard and the Navy Storage yard of surplus small boats at Manchester. Dad would bid on all the boats that came up surplus and he was successful a good share of the time. I got to go along if it did not interfere with school too badly and my grades did not suffer. I always liked tug boating better than school. Let me tell you about our little trips to the Navy yard to pick up boats that dad had bid on. We could pick up as many as 20 boats at one time but they all needed work to float. A lot of times Jack would drive over a day or two early and work on the boats. All boats were dried out and it took about 3 weeks for the hulls with caulked seams to swell up. We patched the boats that had holes with plywood and canvas and bear-shit (it was a black roofing tar we got by the 5 gallon bucket). Then we plugged the exhaust pipes with damage control plugs. We had thousands of them, large and small.   Checked all the thru the hull fittings and put the drain plugs back in. We had to do a really good job on the boats that had engines and make sure that you didn’t get salt water into any of the engines. On the LCVP landing barges, we made sure that the bow gates were dogged down. On our tug we would get a lot of tie up lines ready and lots of tires for fenders because you had to tie the boats two abreast and maybe ten long, gas was needed for your scow pumps because once they were craned into the water you had to start pumping  till you got back to Lake Union. They had to be made up to go through Ferry swells and ships swells and survive. You had to transfer the gas pumps and hoses between the boats - and some boats were so bad that you could not keep up and they sunk awash. Jack and I anchored up two 40 foot motor launches off 4-Mile Rock that were awash and I came out after school and towed them into the yard ,still awash; they would not sink if they were motor launches and did not have engines.

The landing barges sunk like a rock with all their armor plate, Dad had bought a lot of natural knees and Jack would tow a 36′ LCVP over to Manchester, load her full and tow her back to the yard except it got real rough off West Point and he could not get near her to pump her and down she went - we never saw her again but we sure had a lot of floating knees bobbing about Puget Sound. Of course they all washed up ashore and were made into fire wood. At times we would put the 26 foot Whaleboats inside one of the bigger boats just so we didn’t have to pump it. It was sure a wonderful learning experience for a young fellow. I remember the Navy decided once to not sell any boats with engines so they ripped the engines out of these beautiful boats and stacked the engines up without tarps over them and ruined all of them; what a waste. Another edict was to take all the searchlights out. Well, they ripped them out and left a gaping hole in the top of the pilot house that it rained through and ruined the rest of the pilot house. We would get them home, clean them up, make the engines run and sell them. They were great boats and people would convert them to pleasure boats, fish boats, work boats and tugboats. I was learning and the DOLPHIN II was my learner boat. I was coming up thru the hawse pipe.

DOC WAS HIGH BIDDER ON A SUNKEN BOAT.

DOC WAS HIGH BIDDER ON A SUNKEN BOAT.

 

DOLPHIN II.

DOLPHIN II.

 

DOLPHIN II AT LOW TIDE AT OUR DOCK IN MILLERS BAY. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

DOLPHIN II AT LOW TIDE AT OUR DOCK IN MILLERS BAY. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TIDE IS STILL OUT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO. SHE LOOKS LIKE A WRECK BUT WAS SHE FAST.

TIDE IS STILL OUT. SHE LOOKS LIKE A WRECK BUT WAS SHE FAST!  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

 

DOC FREEMAN ON THE DOLPHIN II. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

DOC FREEMAN ON THE DOLPHIN II. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TUG: DWARF (EX-VIRJO YOUNG; EX-BROWN’S BAY) Official # 210233; Registered length 44 feet; Beam 11 feet; depth of hold 5.2 feet.  Built in 1912 at Winslow, WA.  16 gross ton; 11 net tons. Built for Browns Bay logging to tow log rafts from their logging operation north of Edmonds to the mills in Ports Ludlow & Gamble. She was powered by a 50 horsepower three cylinder Corliss. She had all the engine controls in the pilot house so she did not carry an engineer. She was another L.H. Coolidge design. I don’t know all the engines that she had but she had a very modern 6-71 GM diesel with a 41/2:1 reduction which should have allowed her to have a 50 inch propeller. She never had the right wheel on her because she never pulled as good as other boats with similar power.

We got her when I sold the ARGOS for mother (dad had passed away in January) in February, 1963 to LeRoy Dry and I took his tug the DWARF in trade. We used her for three years till I was able to sell her. I chartered her from mother and used her in my towing business. In fact a couple of the photos that we have of her were towing the GUZZEL, my 50 foot salvage barge named for the voracity of her pumps.

In 1934 and 1946, the Merchant Vessel Registry shows that she was owned by Capitol City Tug company in Olympia, WA and in 1934 she had 100 horsepower, I wonder if it was a Fairbanks-Morse CO.  LeRoy had coveralls on and was working in the engine room and he got caught on a revolving shaft and got wound up tight in it. He cut his way out and just lucky that he had access to a doctor who stopped the flow of blood and sewed him back together. If he had been in some boom ground or on the anchor he told me he would have bled to death.Wow!  It’s always that close. I sold her to Joe Park of Bainbridge Island on December 19th 1966.

 

PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT STORY ON THE BROWNS BAY.

PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT STORY ON THE BROWN’S BAY.

 

BROWN'S BAY AFTER REBUILD.

BROWN’S BAY AFTER REBUILD.

 

 

 

DWARF WITH SALVAGE BARGE GUZZEL IN TOW 8-1963. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

DWARF WITH SALVAGE BARGE GUZZEL IN TOW 8-1963. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

DWARF AGAIN IN LAKE WASHINGTON. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

DWARF AGAIN IN LAKE WASHINGTON. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

JAN.1966 DWARF AT TUG PIER FREMONT BOAT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

JAN.1966 DWARF AT TUG PIER FREMONT BOAT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TUGS AT FREMONT BOAT FROM RIGHT TO LEFT DWARF, SKOOKUM LOGGER, IN FRONT MANILA. ALONGSIDE LOGGER IS THE STOKER.MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

TUGS AT FREMONT BOAT FROM RIGHT TO LEFT: DWARF, SKOOKUM LOGGER, IN FRONT MANILA. ALONGSIDE LOGGER IS THE STOKER.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

SCAN-3

FERN: Official # 234815; built in 1915 at Winslow, WA as a wooden steam lighthouse tender for the U.S. Lighthouse Service.  Registered length 102.8 feet; beam 22.2 feet; depth of hold 9.8 feet;  207 gross tons; 170 net ton; power after the steam triple expansion engine and boiler were removed was a 300 horsepower Washington direct reversible heavy duty diesel. I don’t know when the Lighthouse Service sold her but in 1938-39 she was the Aleutian Islands mail boat which she was a little small for.  At the start of WW II she was sold to the Army Corp of Engineers. Doc, Jim and Dave bought her to use as a salvage vessel on the sunken 180 foot PACIFIC QUEEN which blew up and sank at the Old Town Dock in Tacoma.  Doc, Jim Valentyne and Dave Updike bought the PACIFIC QUEEN  in March. 1958. That was a tremendous operation. Dave, who was the diver, welded steel plates all the way around her so at a very low tide they would act as a cofferdam so they could start pumping and the idea, of course, was to pump enough water out so that she would raise with the incoming tide – and it worked. The below deck gasoline explosion blew a hole in her side that had to be fixed and lots of other leaks had to be stopped before she would raise. But up she came on June 17, 1958 and the FERN and the ARGOS towed her back to our Northlake Yard. She was sunk for 9 months and on her stern where there was no copper paint the teredos or ship worms were as big as your thumb.

After Doc finished the salvage job he set to work making a tug out of the FERN. He cut the back of the house off and installed a tow winch and pins, put a new cargo mast on her, rebuilt several areas, put in new bulkheads, recaulked the decks, fixed the keelson and drydocked her. While in dry dock he had the tail shaft pulled and rebuilt the stern bearing and stuffing box, etc. It’s what you do to old boats. Dad sold her a couple of times and we had to repossess her once. This fellow quit making payments so dad said ‘Well, it’s time to get my boat back.’  I took the tug ARGOS and Dave Updike, 6’6’’; Jim Valentyne, 6’3’’; and Paul Yitterdal, 6’2’’ and I went to Ballard. We tied up alongside and the boarding party started in clearing guys out of the state rooms and bunks. You have never seen guys get off a boat so quick! Once they were gone, I made up alongside and towed her back to our Northlake Boat Sales yard. In between times she made a trip to the Aleutian Islands and back so dads’ rebuild must have been okay. We sold her to Paul Cook on October 1, 1961 and she went crab fishing in Alaska. The last photo that I have of her was in La Conner where she had been renamed the NORTHERN ONE and she looked as neglected as you could get. I was very happy to be in the Coast Guard when the PACIFIC QUEEN was salvaged. I would stop in while on liberty to see every one and it was the dirtiest job that I had ever seen - but I avoided that one being that I was working for Uncle Sam.

TFERN AT THE BALLARD BRIDGE CIRCA 1940. JOE WILLIAMSON PHOTO

FERN AT THE BALLARD BRIDGE CIRCA 1940. JOE WILLIAMSON PHOTO

 

FERN IN THE LOCKS. JOE WILLIAMSON PHOTO.

FERN IN THE LOCKS. JOE WILLIAMSON PHOTO.

 

FEERN ALONGSIDE THE SUNKEN PACIFIC QUEEN IN TACOMA. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

FERN ALONGSIDE THE SUNKEN PACIFIC QUEEN IN TACOMA. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TWO 10 INCH PUMPS ON THE PACIFIC QUEEN. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

TWO TEN- INCH PUMPS ON THE PACIFIC QUEEN. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

JIM & DAVE TOUGH YOUNG FELLOWS. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

JIM & DAVE - TOUGH YOUNG FELLOWS. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CREW FROM LEFT DAVE UPDIKE, JOHN OMENDSON, JIM VALENTYNE AND MARK FREEMAN. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

CREW FROM LEFT DAVE UPDIKE, JOHN OMENDSON, JIM VALENTYNE AND MARK FREEMAN. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

 

WILL SHE RAISE? ARGOS IN BACKGROUND.

WILL SHE RAISE? ARGOS IN BACKGROUND.

 

1958 ARGOS ON THE HEAD END, FERN ALONGSIDE PACIFIC QUEEN. JOHN VALENTYNE PHOTO

1958 ARGOS ON THE HEAD END, FERN ALONGSIDE PACIFIC QUEEN. JOHN VALENTYNE PHOTO

 

FERN IN THE LOCKS WITH THE PACIFIC QUEEN. JOHN VALENTYNE PHOTO.

FERN IN THE LOCKS WITH THE PACIFIC QUEEN. JOHN VALENTYNE PHOTO.

 

FERN & PACIFIC QUEEN TIED AT NORTHLAKE BOAT. MAY FREEMAN PHOTO.

FERN & PACIFIC QUEEN TIED AT NORTHLAKE BOAT. MAY FREEMAN PHOTO

 

FERN SHIFTING PACIFIC QUEEN IN LAKE UNION. DOC FREEMAN DECKHAND.

FERN SHIFTING PACIFIC QUEEN IN LAKE UNION. DOC FREEMAN DECKHAND.

 

FERN AND MOTHER MAY FREEMAN AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

FERN AND MY MOTHER, MAY FREEMAN, AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

FERN WITH AFT SUPERSTRUCTUR CUT OFF AND TOW WINCH INSTALLED. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

FERN WITH AFT SUPERSTRUCTURE CUT OFF AND TOW WINCH INSTALLED. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

 

FERN AS NORTHERN 1 IN LACONNER IN BAD SHAPE . MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

FERN AS NORTHERN ONE IN LA CONNER IN BAD SHAPE . MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

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THE GO-GETTER

On August 30, 1947, Freeman & Gibson were high bidder on the tug GO-GETTER – a very neat double-house tug about 70 feet long, powered by two Fairbanks-Morse 100 horsepower CO diesels built in 1923 at Houghton, Washington which was the home for Lake Washington Ship Yard. Official #222837;  Ol.s;  registered length 67.6 feet; beam 19.3 feet; depth of hold 9.6 feet; 79 gross tons and 54 net tons. She was named for Peter B Kynes’ book of the same name GO-GETTER.  She was built for C.D. Johnson lumber Co. at Newport, Oregon. Her original house was a step and one half, small house which Bob Richardson of Coos Bay thought that they changed to a double house in 1939 or 1940 at Newport, Oregon. The second house was more modern with a separate pilot house. She became a Navy tug during WW II. Ray Stickler towed her home for us with his 40 foot, 55 horsepower tug VAMOOSE for $75.00  from Kilisut Harbor on Marrowstone Island where the Navy stored a lot of surplus vessels.  Dad had his mechanic, Bob Dunigan, get her running. Now there was a character, we all used to laugh at how old Bob was. He had to be at least 125 because of all the things that he told us that he had done. He must of kissed the same Blarney Stone as my Grandpa Fitzpatrick had. Oh the Irish have great tales; of course I never got any of that – it always skips a generation.

When she went on her trial run, I was sick but upstairs where I could see every thing and the day that they got the engines running my dad took her for a spin. I really wanted to go but, no, I was sick and could not leave the house. I was watching her back out and take off down the lake, a big bone in her teeth. Dad turns her around and is coming back to our dock instead he goes flying by the end of the dock - he must have been making over 10 knots, comes hard over and heads back out into the Lake and I sit and wonder what is going on. He comes back at a much slower speed and ties her up on the end of the dock and I wait for the rest of the story. It seems like she has telegraphs to control the engines, just like the CLARINDA and one of them stuck at full ahead and that’s why he came flying by the end of the dock  – nothing like having some sea room. That’s what trial runs are for. We sold her to Bob Bushre of Alaska who put in a couple of 8-268A  500 horsepower  GM  diesels and eventually she ended up as a Sause  Brothers tug working on the Oregon Coast. In June of 1952 she went ashore at the mouth of the Columbia River in thick fog towing a loaded lumber barge but they got her off and she towed for years for Sause.  She was a real pretty tug.

The journey to Kilisut  Harbor to look at surplus boats was an adventure in itself. First, you drove to Edmonds and waited for the ferry which would take you to Port Ludlow where you drove off the ramp and up the highway to the Oak Bay Cut where you would get in line for a much smaller ferry the NORDLAND. She was right out of the history books or how things used to be. She was about 65 feet long and for power she had a two cylinder Washington heavy-duty diesel of about 30 H.P. and she would turn about 250 r.p.m.’s. They had poured a concrete pad on each side of the cut so that the ferry could run her bow up on the concrete and hold herself there by running the engine ahead and they would lower the ferry ramp and you would drive off . I forgot to say that you had to back up the ramp to get on the ferry and that was not for the faint of heart. The ferry would hold five or six cars. She would back off the concrete and run against the current  Kapuk, kapuk, kapuk and land on the other side, drop the ramp and you would drive off and onto the highway for a short drive to the Navy moorings. Then there was the red tape (yes, even then) and out to look at the boats that were up for bid. When you were done looking, you jumped back in your car and repeat the crossing of the Oak Bay Cut. You drove as fast as you could to Port Ludlow knowing that if you missed the ferry it was a four hour wait for her to make the round trip. I can’t tell you how many times that we arrived at the Port Ludlow ferry dock only to view the ferry just leaving and about 100 feet off the dock. So you just added 6 hours to your trip figuring a four hour round trip and then you had to ride the ferry for two more hours to get to Edmonds. I used to explore the old Port Ludlow mill that was no longer there. The cement smoke stack was still standing where the burner was and I knew every foot of it. There was good reason to build the Hoods Canal Bridge because if they had not done so everyone would still be living in the stone age west of Hoods Canal. They eventually built a bridge across the Oak Bay Cut and the ferry was put up for sale and Bob Schoen, who ran the ferry dock at Orcas, bought her and used her to move stuff all around the San Juan Islands.

GO-GETTER AS BUILT  LOOK AT THE SQUARE RIGGERS IN LAKE UNION

GO-GETTER AS BUILT. LOOK AT THE SQUARE RIGGERS IN LAKE UNION

 

GO-GETTER ON THE OREGON COASTE.

GO-GETTER ON THE OREGON COAST.

 

DELIVERY RECEIPT FROM MARITIME COMMISSION.

DELIVERY RECEIPT FROM MARITIME COMMISSION.

 

GO=GETTER AT FREMONT BOAT. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

GO-GETTER AT FREMONT BOAT. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

GO-GETTER UP FOR SURVEY AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

GO-GETTER UP FOR SURVEY AT LAKE UNION DRYDOCK. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT ARTICLE ON BOB BUSHRE AND BUYING THE GO-GETTERE.

PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT ARTICLE ON BOB BUSHRE AND BUYING THE GO-GETTER BY SCUTTLE BUTT PETE.

 

GO-GETTER AS A CIVILIAN TUG.

GO-GETTER AS A CIVILIAN TUG.

 

GO-GETTER IN DRYDOCK.

GO-GETTER IN DRYDOCK.

 

GO-GETTER JUST LEAVING COOS BAY WITH TOW.

GO-GETTER JUST LEAVING COOS BAY WITH TOW.

 

GO-GETTER IN DRY DOCK.

GO-GETTER IN DRY DOCK.

 

 

H.B. Jones: Cannery tender-tug; Official # 207216, OL.s;  registered length 56.2 feet; beam 14 feet; depth of hold 7.6 feet. Built in 1910 at Seattle, WA. In 1934 she belonged to Alaska Pacific Salmon Corp. and had 85 horsepower. In 1941 she belonged to Archie L Brown of Port Townsend, WA and had 120 horsepower. In 1950 her name was changed to TONI and her owner was Henry S Curry. Doc bought her, I think, in December 1946. She was a typical Cannery Tender with house aft and hold forward; she had to have had a big mast and boom but it had been removed before dad bought her. She had been re-engined and had a 6-71 GM with a 3:1 reduction gear. We towed with her and even went to Millers Bay with her. She drew about 6 feet and the bay went completely dry at low tide - I have a photo of her laying at our dock with the tide out. We did not have her tied close enough to the dock when the tide went out and she leaned over hard on the dock and pushed the dock out of line a little. When we had Burr build the dock we had him put in extra fender piling but it wasn’t enough. Doc sold her but I have no records of who he sold it to or who he bought it from.

 

 

H.B.JONES LAID OVER AT LOW TIDE AT OUR MILLERS BAY DOCK. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

H.B.JONES LAID OVER AT LOW TIDE AT OUR MILLERS BAY DOCK. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

H. B. JONES AND DOC & MAY FREEMAN MERRY STEERING. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

H. B. JONES WITH DOC & MAY FREEMAN. MERRY IS STEERING.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

MERRY ON THE BOW OG THE H. B. JONES.

MERRY ON THE BOW OF THE H. B. JONES

 

DOC IN THE WHEEL HOUSE OF THE H,  B, JONES. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

DOC IN THE WHEEL HOUSE OF THE H. B. JONES.    MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

Workboat/tug GLENMAR (ex-EIGHT BALL) Official #240946 OL.s; registered length 38.1 feet; beam 11 feet; depth of hold 4.7 feet; 14 gross tons; 11 net tons. Built at Burlington, WA in 1941. Power was a 6-71 GM diesel.  Doc was high bidder and awarded the boat on August 12, 1959 by the U.S. Naval Supply Depot at Pier 91. Associated Transfer brought her to our Northlake Boat Sales yard on a truck and we made her ready to set in the water. We got her running and cleaned her up, we
never used her, just put her up for sale.

I was off active duty for the Coast Guard so I got to work on all the projects when I went to work full time for my
dad. That was for $1.61 an hour – the smart guys got $3.50 an hour. Gives you a little idea of what things were worth in that time period. I bought Fremont Boat on September 20, 1959 so we brought her down to my place and I started advertising
her. On February 17, 1960 we sold her to my friend Dr. Erickson and he fixed her up. She was later sold into Alaska and my sister, Merry, and her husband Pat ran her back when her job was finished so then I had her for sale again. In 1964 she
belonged to Trem Williams of Juneau, Alaska. I remember having to run her down to our Northlake Yard during the big blow when it hit 100 m.p.h.  I had her tied up to the end of Dock 1, which is our farthest East dock, and the waves were so big that she was trying to sit on the dock - and she was a big, heavy, able boat. I had to rebuild the last 150 feet of the dock because the storm tore it apart. Today, our neighbor to the East has their docks built out to the pierhead line, so we are a bit more protected.

HERE WE ARE UNLOADING HER FROM AN ASSOCIATED TRANSFER TRUCK AT OUR NORTHLAKE YARD. WE ALWAYS CALLED THE YARD FANTASY LAND. MAY FREEMAN PHOTO.

HERE WE ARE UNLOADING THE GLENMAR FROM AN ASSOCIATED TRANSFER TRUCK AT OUR NORTHLAKE YARD. WE ALWAYS CALLED THE YARD FANTASY LAND. MAY FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

GLENMAR AT FREMONT BOAT CO.LEWISTON BEHIND HER. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

GLENMAR AT FREMONT BOAT CO.; LEWISTON BEHIND HER. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

BILL OF SALE FROM DOC FREEMAN TO DR. ERICKSON. MARK FREEMAN SCRAPBOOK.

BILL OF SALE FROM DOC FREEMAN TO DR. ERICKSON. MARK FREEMAN SCRAPBOOK.

 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

SUBMITTED ON  2/24/2014

Dear Capt. Freeman,
I met Randy Flodquist aboard the ferry “Wahkiakum” yesterday 2-23-2014. The remarkable thing is that I had been searching for info on the tugs “Daphne”,”Polar Star” and “Polar Merchant”. I recalled references to them on “Rudderless” so part of Friday and Saturday was spent scanning your blog.
I have lived on Puget Island my entire 68 years. I have no history of employment on tug boats so my interest, while intense, is purely armchair. My seafaring took place in the fishing industry. My father built his own gillnetter and was a customer at Doc Freeman’s. He bought a short block for a Chrysler Royal straight 8 there in 1959.
1946 Steel Hull: Nichols, Hood River,Or
Engine: Atlas Imperial lowered into hull in Portland. Allignment and installation by Brit  and  Pete Vik at Puget Island.
Wooden Cabin: The Vik brothers at Puget Island.  Peter Vik was my father.

We called the “Louie” the “Little Louie” since it was the smallest of the three Westport tugs. My cousin spent a season trolling in Alaska on the “Little Louie” but when I saw a picture it was obviously not the Westport boat. An old hand recalled that the “Louie” with no engine departed the Columbia towed by the “Irene” which had a D17000 V-8 Cat. The boat my cousin was on was the “Lil Louie”. We surmised that since the “Irene” was smaller the new owners named her the “Lil Louie”. My cousin verified the V-8 Cat. In 1975 I visited the Percival Dock following the Olympia Tug Races (we were on our honeymoon and it ain’t over) and there was the “Lil Louie”. Inspection of the forward bulwarks revealed nail holes spelling “Irene”. This is the Miles Hargitt “LiL Louie”.
Feel free to publish this message. You likely know most of this. My subconsious motive is to show you what I know!
Thank-you,
Paul Vik

 

Another reader writes:

It was nice to find out the final disposition of the Silver Bay 2. My dad Allen Hall ran her for a number of years for Silver Bay Logging and I too spent a few years on the ol girl. She was a good boat for towing log rafts and ramp barges around S.E. Alaska.

And another:

Thanks for sharing this blog. Stumbled across it on the Internet looking for Tug Pics. My dad has been a West Coast Canadian Tug man all my life. He has almost completed building a Tug from scratch with my Uncle. They named her Sea Wind after the original Sea Wind that was once registered to my Grandmother. Dad has not been in good Health in the last 6 months has had 4 surgeries and being treated for cancer. He still spends most of his spare time on the Tugs they have up the Fraser River. Its not just a career it’s the lifestyle.
Thanks again for the cute blog surely appreciate the history. Tracy Lynn  from Sechelt BC

Another reader:

Interested to read about Garden and Doc Freeman collaborating on surplus WW 2 Plane Rearming Boat conversions. I own a PRB outfited as a commercial salmon troller based in SF CA. It is 70 years old and still going strong. I worked my way through school fishing her. I plan to fish salmon in retirement from my shore job  (I am 64) and am restoring her for a return to high activity. The boat still has an active CA salmon permit. Amazingly, the hull is in great shape. That mil spec plywood of the 1940s has no equal today. Most of the topside post war plywood has needed repairs which are now being done. Has a Wood Freeman Model 11 Iron Mike autopilot. Are the Freemans on your website related to Wood Freeman?

Regards, Mark Meltzer

[Mark Freenan here: No, Mr. Meltzer, we've no known relationship to the Wood Freeman world - but aren't they wonderful autopilots!? Thanks for writing.]

And from our friend, Bill Page:

First rate Blog Mark – We all enjoy these very much.  Keep up the good work. The USCG SWIVEL (out of Rockland – the foggy place) used to go up the Penobscot River by my home town of Winterpoirt on her way to Bangor, breaking ice.  One of her name boards is sitting in a used marine gear shop in Rockland right now – 4/sale.  All the best to you, Margie, and the Crew. Take care,   Bill

PAGETRADITIONALBOATS.com x pageboats@roadrunner.com

 BILL PAGE PAGETRADITIONALBOATS.com pageboats@roadrunner.com

 

 

Our man in Victoria, Mike Claxton, sent us two photos of Canadian Tugs, I think they started with Mike Wright. Thanks Mike.

 

YOUNG HUSTLER 1 UHDER KINGCOME OWNERSHIP. THANKS MIKE

YOUNG HUSTLER 1 UNDER KINGCOME OWNERSHIP. THANKS MIKE

 

MARLIN II & KATHY K. THANKS MIKE

MARLIN II & KATHY K.   THANKS MIKE

 

Our man at Brusco Towing in Everett, Jay Niederhauser, sent us several photos of the CLEO BRUSCO assisting the WESTWOOD VICTORIA. Thanks Jay.

 

CLEO BRUSCO FROM ABOVE. THANKS JAY

CLEO BRUSCO FROM ABOVE. THANKS JAY

 

CLEO BRUSCO. JAY NIEDERHAUSER PHOTO.

CLEO BRUSCO. JAY NIEDERHAUSER PHOTO.

 

Ben Sias, our man on Bainbridge Island, was transiting the Swinomish Slough and took these photos. Thanks Ben for keeping us up to date. He also was in Port Townsend and sent us photos from there.

 

DAVID N USED AS GILNETTER IN SE ALASKA. DON NYSTROM HAS VERY GOOD TASTING SALMON.

DAVID N USED AS GILNETTER IN SE ALASKA. DON NYSTROM HAS VERY GOOD TASTING SALMON!!

 

DELANCO, I SAW A TV COMMERCIAL MADE ON HER THE OTHER DAY.

DELANCO, I SAW A TV COMMERCIAL MADE ON HER THE OTHER DAY.

 

QUAIL MOVED DOWN FROM ANACORTES SHE HAS A 200 HORSEPOWER ATLAS.

QUAIL MOVED DOWN FROM ANACORTES.  SHE HAS A 200 HORSEPOWER ATLAS

 

DUNLAP TOWING HAS THE SAMISH FOR SALE.

DUNLAP TOWING HAS THE SAMISH FOR SALE.

 

SUSAN H IS NOW A LIVEABOARD AND BEN IS A VERY GOOD BOAT CARPENTER SO SHE WILL GET GOOD CARE AS LONG AS HE OWNS HER.

SUSAN H IS NOW A LIVEABOARD AND BEN IS A VERY GOOD BOAT CARPENTER SO SHE WILL GET GOOD CARE AS LONG AS HE OWNS HER.

 

CHICKAMAUGA OUT ON THE HARD. WHATS NEXT, WIKK SOMONE STEP UP TO THE PLATE AND INVEST A WHOLE LOT OF DOLLARS I HOPE SO. I AM STILL LOOKING FOR ARTIFACTS OFF HER.

CHICKAMAUGA OUT ON THE HARD AFTER SINKING. WHAT’S NEXT, WILL SOME ONE STEP UP TO THE PLATE AND INVEST A WHOLE LOT OF DOLLARS ? I HOPE SO. I AM STILL LOOKING FOR ARTIFACTS OFF HER.

 

CHICKAMAUGA NO WONDER THAT SHE WAS A GOOD PULLER.

CHICKAMAUGA. NO WONDER THAT SHE WAS A GOOD PULLER.

 

CHICKAMAUGA TWO JIMMYS WILL TURN THAT WHEEL.

CHICKAMAUGA TWO JIMMYS WILL TURN THAT WHEEL.

 

CREOSOTE GETTING A NEW LEASE ON LIFE ISNT IT WONDERFUL ANOTHER OLD TUG SAVED.
CREOSOTE GETTING A NEW LEASE ON LIFE. ISN’T IT WONDERFUL ANOTHER OLD TUG SAVED.

 

SCHOONER ADVENTURESS IS CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OLD AND NOW HAS ANEW HULL MAY SHE LAST ANOTHER 100 YEARS.

SCHOONER ADVENTURESS IS CELEBRATING 100 YEARS OLD AND NOW HAS A NEW HULL MAY SHE LAST ANOTHER 100 YEARS.

 

Christopher Peterson  was changing computers so I ended up with a bunch of great tugboat photos which I will share with you. Thanks Chris.

 

ATKA AT OLYMPIA RACES

ATKA AT OLYMPIA RACES. AL GLASER BUILT HER.

 

CEDAR KING A DUNLAP BOAT NOW OLYMPIA TOWING BUILT HER WITH A D343 CAT NATURAL.

CEDAR KING A DUNLAP BOAT NOW OLYMPIA TOWING BUILT HER WITH A D343 CAT NATURAL.

 

DANIELLE A MANKE LOG TOWER.

DANIELLE, A MANKE LOG TOWER.

 

ELF  GONE SHE SANK IN B.C. WAS THE FOSS 15, SKOOKUM CASHE. STEVE TATE TOWED WITH HER FOR YEARS.

ELF IS GONE. SHE SANK IN B.C. (ex-FOSS 15; ex-SKOOKUM CASHE). STEVE TATE TOWED WITH HER FOR YEARS

 

 

JOE EX JOE FOSS ROBIN PATERSON PUT A NEW HOUSE ON HER AND AL GLASER DID THE REBUILD, 671 GM 3-1 GEAR.

JOE (EX-JOE FOSS).  ROBIN PATERSON PUT A NEW HOUSE ON HER AND AL GLASER DID THE REBUILD, 6-71 GM 3:1 GEAR.

 

JOE MADE A GREAT CRUSING BOAT FOR ROBIN & KAE.

JOE MADE A GREAT CRUISING BOAT FOR ROBIN & KAE

 

THERES ROBIN NOW WE SURE ALL MISS HIM.

THERE’S ROBIN NOW. WE SURE ALL MISS HIM.

 

JOE'S PILOT HOUSE.

JOE’S PILOT HOUSE.

 

PARTHIA ANOTHER TUG WITH A 6-71 AND REALL Y FAST, AT DOCTON

PARTHIA ANOTHER TUG WITH A 6-71 AND REALLY FAST, TIED AT DOCKTON.

 

PATRON BUILT AS RUBY 2 TO WORK ON THE DAMS, USED TO HAVE A TOP HOUSE. WAS CALLED THE FEARLESS WHEN RIC HAD HER. 160 HP WASHINGTON, AT DOCTON.

PATRON BUILT AS THE RUBY 2 TO WORK ON THE DAMS. SHE USED TO HAVE A TOP HOUSE. WAS CALLED THE FEARLESS WHEN RIC HAD HER. 160 HP WASHINGTON, AT DOCKTON. I LIKE THE BUFF PAINT.

 

CREOSOTE ONE 3 SISTERS THE MALOLO AND THE CREST KINDA THE SAME HULL DESIGNED BY COOLIDGE. 6-110 GM.

CREOSOTE ONE  OF 3 SISTERS THE MALOLO AND THE CREST  – KINDA THE SAME HULL DESIGNED BY COOLIDGE. 6-110 GM.

 

RELIANCE IF I REMEMBER  GORDON WILLIE BOUGHT HER IN WILLIPA BAY AND SOLD HER TO PHIL SHIVELEY WHO REBUILT HER ANOTHE KNIFE WITH A 6-71 GM FOR POWER.

RELIANCE. IF I REMEMBER RIGHT, GORDON WILLIE BOUGHT HER IN WILLIPA BAY AND SOLD HER TO PHIL SHIVELEY WHO REBUILT HER.  ANOTHER KNIFE THRU THE WATER WITH A 6-71 GM FOR POWER.

 

SCAN-5

 

DIXIE SHIFTING # 2 DRYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. RICHIE BORNEMAN PHOTO.

DIXIE SHIFTING # 2 DRYDOCK AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. RICHIE BORNEMAN PHOTO.

 

80TH BIRTHDAY STUFF.

We are having a series of neat lunches with friends from near and far that started in March…and will continue until we’re done. I’d never hear, or be able to visit with everyone in one room. So, we’re celebrating our way. Expect more photo opportunities!

 

 

RICHARD SEABORN, MARGIE AND MARK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

RICHARD SEABORN, MARGIE AND MARK. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

MARK AND MARGIE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

MARK AND MARGIE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

MY BIRTHDAY CAKE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

MY BIRTHDAY CAKE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TOM MADE ME 2 NAME BOARDS FOR MY FIRST TWO TUGS.

TOM MADE ME TWO NAME BOARDS FOR MY FIRST TWO TUGS.

 

ANOTHER BIRTHDAY PARTY. MISS BLUE,RICHIE,TOM AND ERIK WHAT FUN.

ANOTHER BIRTHDAY PARTY. MARK, MISS BLUE, RICHIE, TOM AND ERIK.  WHAT FUN.

 

WHATS THIS.

WHAT’S THIS?

 

1946 MARINE DIGEST MAGAZINES MY FAVORITE.MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

1946 MARINE DIGEST MAGAZINES, MY FAVORITE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO

 

ANOTHER PARTY? CATHY & JOE AND MARK.

ANOTHER PARTY!!  CATHY, JOE AND MARK

 

SUSY BURKE AND KEN CAME AND WE HAD GREAT BS.

SUSIE BURKE AND KEN CAME FOR ANOTHER PARTY AND WE HAD A GREAT B.S. SESSION.

 

IT WAS SUCH A GALA EVENT THAT KEN PHILLIPS EVEN WORE A TIE.

IT WAS SUCH A GALA EVENT THAT KEN PHILLIPS EVEN WORE A TIE.

 

HIEDI AND ERIK AND MARINA HAD THERE OWN SPECIAL PARTY.

HEIDI, ERIK AND MARINA HAD THEIR OWN SPECIAL PARTY FOR ME.

 

MARINA MAY IS GOING TO BE TALLER THAN I.

MARINA MAY (AGE 11) IS GOING TO BE TALLER THAN ME.

 More neat Fremont going’s on…

GATOR IS LOOKING GOOD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

GATOR IS LOOKING GOOD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CAPT.TOM WORKS UNDERWATER JUST AS GOOD AS HE WORKS ON TOP OF THE WATER. DID YOU KNOW THAT TOM DOVE ON THE SUNKEN KNOT SHIP OFF PORT ANGELES THE DIAMOND KNOT ASK HIM HOW DEEP THAT WAS.

CAPT. TOM WORKS UNDERWATER JUST AS GOOD AS HE WORKS ON TOP OF THE WATER. DID YOU KNOW THAT TOM DOVE ON THE SUNKEN KNOT SHIP OFF PORT ANGELES - THE DIAMOND KNOT? ASK HIM HOW DEEP THAT WAS!  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

Margie and I took a car trip to Anacortes - we have breakfast in the Calico Cupboard which is worth the drive. Then up to Cap Sante and then we go exploring. What fun!

 

MARGID & MARK AT THEIR FAVORITE VIEW SPOT. DONT ASK ME THE NAME OF THE PERSON THAT TOOK OUR PICTURE.

MARGIE & MARK AT THEIR FAVORITE VIEW SPOT. DON’T ASK ME THE NAME OF THE PERSON THAT TOOK OUR PICTURE.

 

ANACORTES HAS SOMONE ON THE PAYROLL THAT REALLY KNOWS HOW DO THINGS, WHAT A NEAT IDEA. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

ANACORTES HAS SOMEONE ON THE PAYROLL THAT REALLY KNOWS HOW DO THINGS, WHAT A NEAT IDEA. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

WESTERN  CHALLENGER SHE WAS A WW II YARD MINESWEEPER. SHE MUST BE A CANADIAN WITH THE WHITE BOOT STRIPE. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

WESTERN CHALLENGER. SHE WAS A WW II YARD MINESWEEPER. SHE MUST BE A CANADIAN WITH THE WHITE BOOT STRIPE. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TUG ALICE USED TO BE THE SIMON FOSS. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

TUG ALICE USED TO BE THE SIMON FOSS. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

MARK IN FRONT OF IVANHOEWHICH SUFFERED A BAD ACCIDENT THAT SEW MAY NOT RECOVER FROM.

MARK IN FRONT OF IVANHOE WHICH SUFFERED A BAD ACCIDENT THAT SHE MAY NOT RECOVER FROM.

 

IVANHOE WITH BUSTED BULWARKS AND CABIN TOP. THEY HAVE A TARP OVER THE 600 HP UNION BUT ALL THE DOORS ARE OPEN ON THE LOWER DECK LOOKS BAD TO ME LIKE NO ONE CARES ANYMORE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

IVANHOE WITH BUSTED BULWARKS AND CABIN TOP. THEY HAVE A TARP OVER THE 600 HP UNION BUT ALL THE DOORS ARE OPEN ON THE LOWER DECK. LOOKS BAD TO ME LIKE NO ONE CARES ANYMORE. HOPE I’M WRONG.  MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TUGUGLY  WELL NAMED.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

TUGUGLY; WELL NAMED. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

WHALE - WW II POWER SCOW THEY MADE GREAT VESSELS FOR THE FISHING FLEET. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

WHALE – WW II POWER SCOW – THEY MADE GREAT VESSELS FOR THE FISHING FLEET. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

SOME ONE HAS A SENSE OF HUMOR. THE SIGN READS BUREAU OF NORWEGIAN AFFAIRS REGISTRATION OFFICE. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

SOME ONE HAS A SENSE OF HUMOR. THE SIGN READS BUREAU OF NORWEGIAN AFFAIRS REGISTRATION OFFICE. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 Our man & woman in Coos Bay, Bob & Ginna Richardson, sent on great photos of that really rough country.

 

GINNA ORCHESTRATING THE WAVES AND THEY DO PAY ATTENTION.

GINNA ORCHESTRATING THE WAVES AND THEY DO PAY ATTENTION.

 

WAVES BREAKING OVER SIMPSON REEF.

WAVES BREAKING OVER SIMPSON REEF.

 

WESTERN MARINER IN COOS BAY.

WESTERN MARINER IN COOS BAY.

 

COOS BAY GOING OUT TO PICK UP CHARLIE OR GEORGE.

COOS BAY GOING OUT TO PICK UP CHARLIE OR GEORGE.

 

NATOMA ENTERING COOS BAY.

NATOMA ENTERING COOS BAY.

 

NATOMA INSIDE AND SAFE.

NATOMA INSIDE AND SAFE.

 

SNOHOMISH A DUNLAP TUG INBOUND.

SNOHOMISH, A DUNLAP TUG,  INBOUND.

THANKS BOB & GINNA!

 

OUR MAN ON WHIDBEY ISLAND, STAN WILHIGHT, SENT ME SO MANY PHOTOS IN JANUARY THAT I HAD TO SPLIT THEM OVER THREE MONTHS.  THANKS STAN FOR WONDERFUL BLACK AND WHITES.

 

9-20-1989 SEASPAN XXXXXXX  HELP WITH CHIPPER AT NEW WESTMINSTER

9-20-1989 SEASPAN TUG (???)  WITH CHIPPER AT NEW WESTMINSTER

 

2-8-1989 ARCTIC MALLIK AT VANCOUVER B.C.

2-8-1989 ARCTIC MALLIK AT VANCOUVER, B.C.

 

3-10-1989 RASP AT NEW WESTMINSTER B.C.

3-10-1989 RASP AT NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.

 

4-9-1989 SWIFTSURE IX AT NEW WESTMINSTER B.C.

4-9-1989 SWIFTSURE IX AT NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.

 

5-8-1989 BARBARA FOSS AT KEYSTONE AND GROUNDING OF FERRY CLICKITAT.

5-8-1989 BARBARA FOSS AT KEYSTONE AND GROUNDING OF FERRY KLICKITAT.

 

8-31-1989 PULLING FERRY OFF BEACH

8-31-1989 PULLING FERRY OFF BEACH

 

8-31-1989 BARBARA FOSS AT KEYSTONE.

8-31-1989 BARBARA FOSS AT KEYSTONE.

 

8-31-1989 BARBARA FOSS AND KLICKITAT

8-31-1989 BARBARA FOSS AND KLICKITAT

 

 

9-15-1989 UNIDENTIFIED TUG LOOKS LIKE YTM NAVY TUG TYPE MAYBE THE PAULA S HELP.

9-15-1989 UNIDENTIFIED TUG LOOKS LIKE YTM NAVY TUG TYPE MAYBE THE PAULA S?  HELP!

 

10-8 1989  WESTERN FLYER ON THE HARD IN PORT TOWNSEND

10-8 1989 WESTERN FLYER ON THE HARD IN PORT TOWNSEND

 

Thanks to all of you who send in pictures and facts so that I can share the information one photo at a time.    Anything that you send me, I can scan and send back to you good as new.

     WANTED:

  1.  Crowley decals and cloth patches for jackets or caps.  The one I really like says “Red Stack Tugs”.

  2.  Old Cary-Davis & Puget Sound Tug & Barge Photos & advertisements.

  3.  Old cannery tender & log towing photos.

  4.  We buy old tug and waterfront photos or collections and snapshots, as well as old (pre-1946) Marine Digest Magazines in any condition.

  5.  Information wanted: in an article in the Yachting magazine, it stated that Doc Freeman bought a tug named LEWIS II in 1943. He got her from Bellingham Tug & Barge and I can’t seem to track her down, any ideas?

  6.  Want  builders plate off the Coast Guard Cutter BONHAM. I gave it to Jim Valentyne after dad bought the BONHAM.

All the best from:

Mark & Margie Freeman, Captains Erik & Tom, Miss Blue, Richie, The Mark Freeman Maritime Museum,

Tatoosh Towing & Salvage, Fremont Boat Co., Fremont Tugboat Co. and the three cats; Braveheart (Indy), Razz

and Batman (all three cats came from a no-kill shelter about 4 years ago.)

P.S.: If you want to send me an e-mail please use mark@fremonttugboat.com  Thank you! – Fairtide Mark.

 

 

 

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MARK FREEMAN’S BIRTHDAY “RUDDERLESS” FOR MARCH 15, 2014.

FB USE Rudderless heading 12-6-12

CAPTAIN MARK

CAPTAIN MARK

OUR LOGO.

OUR LOGO.

 

NORTHWEST SEAPORT HAD A SOLD-OUT EVENT FOR THE SHOWING OF THE NEW VIDEO ON THE TUG ARTHUR FOSS ALONG WITH THE MOVIE ‘TUGBOAT ANNIE’.  THIS WAS THE KICK-OFF EVENT, BUT YOU HAVEN’T MISSED OUT  YET –  SO LOOK FOR SIMILAR FUND RAISING EVENTS THIS YEAR.

2

 OKAY, SO THIS IS BEING PUBLISHED A WEEK EARLY.  BUT I STILL WANTED TO HAVE MY ACTUAL BIRTHDAY ON THE HEADING.

 

MY NEPHEW SCOTT STOPPELMAN LIVES IN LA CONNER, I GUESS WE SHOULD CALL HIM OUR MAN IN LA CONNER.  HE KEEPS HIS BOAT AT SHELTER BAY AND HE TOOK SENSATIONAL PHOTOS OF THE BOAT FIRES.  IT WAS HIS GOOD FORTUNE NOT TO BE HURT OR HAVE HIS BOAT BURNED UP.

BOAT FIRES IN LaCONNER.

BOAT FIRES IN LA CONNER.

 

BOAT FIRES IN LaCONNER.

BOAT FIRES IN LA CONNER.

 

BOAT FIRES AT LaCONNER.

BOAT FIRES AT LA CONNER.

 

BOAT FIRES AT LaCONNER.

BOAT FIRES AT LA CONNER.

 

QUILCEDA BRINGS IN DECK BARGE TO PUT BURNED BOATS ONTO.

QUILCEDA BRINGS IN DECK BARGE TO PUT BURNED BOATS ONTO.

 

IMG_0202

 

BURNED BOAT.

BURNED BOAT.

 

SORRY SIGHT.

SORRY SIGHT.

THANKS SCOTT.

 

 

 

RON BURCHETT GETTING READY TO LAY THE NET OUT ON THIS SALMON SEINER AT THE MONROE MODEL MEET LAST MONTH .

RON BURCHETT GETTING READY TO LAY THE NET OUT FROM THIS SALMON SEINER AT THE MONROE MODEL MEET LAST MONTH

 

BRAND NEW HARLEY TUG MODEL FROM RON.

BRAND NEW HARLEY TUG MODEL FROM RON.

 

NEW CROWLEY TIG WAHINGTON FROM RON.

NEW CROWLEY TUG WASHINGTON FROM RON.

 

GREAT PHOTO OF THE ST3EAM TUG KATAHDIN IN THE LOCKS WITH A SHIP EQUATOR IS ALONGSIDE. DOUG LEEN PHOTO. DOUG OWND THE KATAHDIN NOW.

GREAT PHOTO OF THE STEAM TUG KATAHDIN IN THE LOCKS WITH A SHIP . EQUATOR IS ALONGSIDE. DOUG LEEN PHOTO. DOUG OWNS THE KATAHDIN NOW.

 

KATAHDIN NOW  SHE IS VERY WELL TAKEN CARE OF AND HAS A 240 HORSEPOWER WASHINGTON DIESEL. DOUG LEEN PHOTO.

KATAHDIN NOW SHE IS VERY WELL TAKEN CARE OF AND HAS A 240 HORSEPOWER WASHINGTON DIESEL. DOUG LEEN PHOTO.

 

THE ATKA A SIDE VIEW FROM LAST MONTHS ISSUE.

THE ATKA – A SIDE VIEW. SEE FEBRUARY ISSUE FOR ANOTHER PHOTO.

 

ANOTHER PHOTO OF THE INVERNESS FROM KEITH STERNBERG.

ANOTHER PHOTO OF THE INVERNESS FROM KEITH STERNBERG.

 

scan0012

 

 

JAY NIEDERHAUSER SAID THAT THE PHOTO OF THE CROWLEY TUG AND BARGE WAS PROBABLY NOT THE SEA QUEEN BUT HER SISTER THE SEA ROVER. HE PLACED IT ON THE DUWAMISH ABOUT MID 1970s. JAY  ALSO SAID THAT THE JOSEPH R WAS THE MARINE DISCOVERER,THEN THE SEANA SEA, AND NOW IS THE HENRY BRUSCO. THANKS FOR KEEPING US UP TO DATE JAY.

KAE PATERSON SENT ME SOME INFORMATION THAT THEIR OLD TUG THE WINAMAC SANK ON NOV. 27,2007 IN CANADA. SHE SANK OFF THE SLATERY BAY GOVERNMENT WHARF AT POWELL RIVER. THERE WAS SOME QUESTION ABOUT THIS INFORMATION; SO, HAS ANYONE SEEN THE WINAMAC?

My dad,”Doc”, bought and sold boats and everything else. He owned a great number of tugs – some he used in his business, others he bought and sold, some he sold on consignment. He bought and sold well over a thousand regular boats including several sailing ships, freighters, yachts, tugs, ferry boats and thousands of surplus vessels, landing barges, motor launches, skiffs dorys, yard oilers, freighters, deck barges, Coast Guard Cutters – you get the idea that if it floated Doc had something to do with it. I also owned several tugs and barges and there is a story and pictures about a lot of them. My brother-in-law, Pat Stoppelman, and my sister, Merry, were in the tugboat business and they had at least 25 different tugs so my work is cut out for me – as if I didn’t have enough to do. I thought that I should start putting them down in print as I am reaching my 80th birthday in March. I have kept all the files that I could lay my hands on. It takes six large deep file drawers that contain info on the boats that just dad and I had.  Dad died in December 1963 when he just turned 60. Any new info that you have, please pass it on to me. Some boats we have just a photo, others are mentioned in trade journals – and we don’t have hardly any files before WW II  and almost no photos during the war except for the trade journals. Silver was used in the war effort and you could not buy any film. Lucky that Joe Williamson, the famous marine photographer, took photos throughout the war and I have a lot of his photos, as well as some from Ray Krantz.

DOC FREEMAN BEFORE 1938.

DOC FREEMAN BEFORE 1938.

 EPISODE 3

On May 11, 1953 the army Engineers in Portland, Oregon sent out an invitation to bid on a dredge and a tender. Dad was high bidder on the tender named the ARLINGTON. Her official number after documentation was 269022; 16.6 Gross and 11 net tons. She was 46.8′ registered length and about 50 feet overall,  12 feet of beam and 3.4′ depth of hold and she was built in 1943 of wood. Dad thought that  Prothero built her. Registered length is measured on the main deck level from the back of the stem to the front of the rudder post so their overall length is always longer. Her power was two 141 horsepower Chrysler Royal gas engines swinging two 30 x 18 inch propellers. She was a typical Columbia River tug with a high pilot house. She was in Portland and Jack McCrary (dad’s right hand guy) had to take her to Longview where the big crane was to load her on to a truck. I don’t know if he ran her there or had her towed. Jack, of course, was clever enough to make her run. We brought her to Seattle and tied her up on Dock 6 at Fremont Boat where she was put up for sale. Lloyd R. Swanson bought her and I have lost track of her after the time that we sold her - which I think happened in 1953 or 1954. I have kept as many files as I could find but sometimes there is not too much information in them. The photo on Dock 6 shows her in the snow and the other two show her at longview.

ARLINGTON AT LONGVIEW, DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

ARLINGTON AT LONGVIEW.  DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

 

ARLINGTON IN THE SLINGS AT LONGVIEW. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

ARLINGTON IN THE SLINGS AT LONGVIEW. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO

 

ARLINGTON AT DOCK 6 IN THE SNOW. MAY FREEMAN PHOTO.

ARLINGTON AT DOCK 6 IN THE SNOW. MAY FREEMAN PHOTO.

Dad was high bidder on the United States Coast Guard Cutter BONHAM on December 17, 1959. The BONHAM  had been stationed at Coos Bay; in fact, local author and naval architect James Cole served on board her as quartermaster. Her official number after she was documented was 281729; 198.6 gross and 135 net tons. She was 125 feet overall and her registered length was 116.6′,  24.1′ beam and 10.7′ depth of hold. She was built in 1926 at the American Brown Boveri Electric Company in Camden, New Jersey. Her power was two 500 horsepower model 8-268 A General Motors diesels. I took our tug ARGOS and Jim Valentyne decked for me, and we towed her to Fremont Boat Company from Base Seattle on Commodore Way and tied her up at the end of Dock 4, where our tugs tie up now. She was named for Pearson H. Bonham, one of the two first Chief Engineers hired by the Coast Guard. I have the bronze casting off her that shows that information on display on the USCG BLUEBERRY. I gave the builders plate to Jim Valentyne and I would like to buy it from whoever has it now. It may be in storage at the Puget Sound Maritime Historical Society; or it could be in private hands. She was a real treat -  neat and tidy and clean and it was an easy job for Jim to get her running. I put her for sale, as I had purchased the Fremont Boat Company on Sept 20, 1959 and I was selling boats at that time.

I started running ads for her as we knew she would make a great off shore tug. We sold her On April 11, 1960 to E.C. Bud Fields of Seafood Storage Inc. in Petersburg, Alaska. We thought at the time that it was a Nick Bez deal. Later she was sold to Jim Hagen at Northland Marine Lines. Jim rebuilt her into a tug to tow his freight barges to Alaska and renamed her POLAR STAR. He repowered her with two D 348 Cats which were 750 horsepower each. She was naturally fast so she made good time with the barges. I was working for Northland with my tugs so I was around her helping her in and out of the Locks with tows when Northland was just across the Canal from Foss. My brother-in-law, Pat Stoppelman, was captain of the POLAR STAR, towing barges back and forth to Alaska and making all those beach landings. His wife, Merry, was chief cook and bottle washer and their two boys  came along; Howard as a sailor and Scott was mess cook so it was a family affair. Scott told me “I was 13 or 14 - depending on what month. I turned 14 on the second trip if I remember. I was the mess boy and boy was I a mess!  Dad actually threatened to put me ashore in Ketchikan if I didn’t shape up and fly right! You know, dirty elbows, shirt un-tucked, hair uncombed, and just generally unkempt! Just about everyday I would take one cigarette and a box of wood matches up to the crows nest and smoke a butt! I don’t think mom or dad ever figured that one out. Those trips were something else I tell you vat!”

USCG BONHAM LEAVING COOS BAY.

USCG BONHAM LEAVING COOS BAY.

 

BONHAM INVITATION TO BID. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

BONHAM INVITATION TO BID. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

RELEASE FORM FROM COAST GUARD WHEN I TOWED BONHAM AWAY. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

RELEASE FORM FROM COAST GUARD WHEN I TOWED BONHAM AWAY. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

BONHAM FOR SALE AT FREMONT BOAT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

BONHAM FOR SALE AT FREMONT BOAT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

BONHAM PLACQE ON BLUEBERRY

BONHAM CASTING ON BLUEBERRY

BONHAM RENAMED POLAR STARJUST PASSING AURORA BRIDGE . MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

BONHAM RENAMED POLAR STAR  JUST PASSING AURORA BRIDGE . MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

POLAR STAR JUST PASSING ME. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

POLAR STAR JUST PASSING ME. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

ART WORK BY JIM COLE SHOWING THE BEFORE AND AFTER OF THE BONHAM-POLAR STAR. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

ART WORK BY JIM COLE SHOWING THE BEFORE AND AFTER OF THE BONHAM-POLAR STAR. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

HER IS APHOTO OF HOWARD & SCOTT STOPPELMAN AND ME ON THE POLAR STAR WHEN PAT WAS CAPTAIN. I HAVE ONE OF MY TUGS THERE ARE WE ARE JUST ABOUT READY TO GET UNDERWAY WITH THE BARGE.

HERE IS A PHOTO OF HOWARD & SCOTT STOPPELMAN AND MARK FREEMAN ON THE POLAR STAR WHEN PAT WAS CAPTAIN. I HAVE ONE OF MY TUGS THERE AND WE ARE JUST ABOUT READY TO GET UNDERWAY WITH THE BARGE.

 

POLAR STAR. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

POLAR STAR. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

HERE I AM SHIFTING THE POLAR STAR WITH MY TUG THE MANILA.

MARK FREEMAN SHIFTING THE POLAR STAR WITH HIS TUG THE MANILA.

 

PAT & MERRY AT NORTHLAND TERMINAL. MAY FREEMAN PHOTO.

PAT & MERRY AT NORTHLAND TERMINAL. MAY FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

 

POLAR STAR IN JUNEAU. SCOTT STOPPELMAN PHOTO.

POLAR STAR IN JUNEAU. SCOTT STOPPELMAN PHOTO.

 

Tug C. B. Smith, official number 127688;  30 gross & 20 net tons. Registered length 52.9′ x 12.9′ beam x 6′ depth of hold. Built 1902 in Everett, WA. In 1942, Dad bought her from the Peck Brothers. She was rotten and had a broken crank shaft in her Gulowsen-Grei  125 horsepower engine and she had a funny square pilot house scabbed on her after running under one of Everett’s numerous bridges and taking the house off, so she wasn’t much and I know that dad couldn’t afford much.  He and mother had just suffered through the great Depression and the only reason things were looking a little better was that WW II had just started. The word on the street several years later was that we would still be in the Depression if the war hadn’t started. Presently,things are not looking too good either! Dad had her towed down and tied her up on the end of Dock 4. He started Mr. Alma Smith tearing her apart, rotten wood out; good wood in. Sounds simple enough until you look at how rotten she was. Alma and Mrs. Smith lived on a house boat at Fremont Boat Market. He was an old time boat builder from the Willapa Bay;  in fact, he and Lauderback were quite famous for all the small tugs that they built like the VAMOOSE & DARING. Out came the old engine and dad bought a 6-71 GM diesel of 165 hp. But he needed to swing a minimum 50 x 30 propeller, and to do that he needed at least a 4:1 reduction gear and guess what, the war effort took them all. So good old Doc figured it out, he bought a 2:1 twin disc gear that would bolt onto the back of the Jimmy and bought a 2:1 in-line reduction gear so that adds up to a 4:1 reduction gear which will swing at least a 50 inch diameter propeller.

It was a total success and that system ran until the boat died in the 1960s or 1970s. He just made the pilot house sound and useable dad thought that it came off one of the Coast Guard 75 footers but no matter what you did to it it still looked like an add on. Dad ran her as a P boat (percentage boat) thru Puget Sound Tug & Barge during the war and was she busy. I have a billing to Puget Sound for some of her towing and she never stopped. She, like a lot of old boats, never had an anchor winch so when you wanted to anchor her you had to go thru the anchor drill. First, you had to unshackle your tow wire and shackle in your stick pennant. Second, run a bunch of slack off the tow winch so that the wire would reach the bow. Third, they had several snatch blocks to run the wire thru to guide the tow wire to the bow.  Fourth, shackle in the anchor chain.  Fifth, lift the anchor which was on deck and swing it over the side from the anchor davit.  Sixth, tie off the anchor with small line, check all fittings and cable so that it leads right. Seventh, cut the anchor loose while having your deck hand stand by the tow winch. Eighth, let out the tow wire to the right length. Ninth, back on her a little to set the anchor.  When you were ready to go - that is the tide was turning, or the wind went down – you would do everything in reverse and you were ready to let your tow wire out and get underway. We would always see her working somewhere. She tied up part of the time at Barr-Bee Mill in South Lake Washington. Bill Willimott anchored her in the deep hole in Millers Bay, she drew about 6 feet. Noel Davis ran her for a while. In the early 1960s Steve Tate owned her for a while. I heard rumors that she sunk once on Hood Canal but she was a very busy girl for a lot of years. I have this letter from Carl H. Stevens about when he worked on the C.B.SMITH:  “She was steam when I was on her. She has a 7 x 14 x 12 inch stroke fore and aft compound engine and a scotch marine boiler permitted 200 pounds of steam. She was originally built much narrower than she is now, the hull being sponsoned out to her present width. She was named after Clarence B. Smith (a marine engineer) and the son of Capt. Smith, her builder.”

C.B.SMITH 1942 AT FREMONT BOAT MARKET

C.B.SMITH 1942 AT FREMONT BOAT MARKET

 

ALMA SMITH REMOVING DRY ROT FROM THE C.B.SMITH.

ALMA SMITH REMOVING DRY ROT FROM THE C.B.SMITH.

MORE DRYROT LOOK AT THE SIZE OF THE TIMBERS THAT THEY ARE PUTTING IN.

MORE DRYROT LOOK AT THE SIZE OF THE TIMBERS THAT THEY ARE PUTTING IN.

 

THE C.B.SMITH JUST OFF STIMPSON MILL.

THE C.B.SMITH JUST OFF STIMPSON MILL.

 

THE C.B.SMITH ANCHORED UP IN MILLERS BAY. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

THE C.B.SMITH ANCHORED UP IN MILLERS BAY. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

LETTER FROM DOC FREEMAN.

LETTER FROM DOC FREEMAN.

 

Tug CHRISTIE R: official number 212419; 12 tons gross; 8 tons net; registered length 36.9’ x 10.6’ x 5.1’; built in 1914 at Seattle, WA with 143 horsepower. It was said that she was originally built as a pile driver tender and came to Cary-Davis in 1922 from the McEachern Company with the first of the two and three cylinder Fairbanks-Morse 45 horsepower CO type semi-diesels.

After it was totally worn out, a 141 horsepower, 8 cylinder Chrysler Royal Gas Engine with a small reduction gear replaced it; to be followed by another with a 4 ½:1  reduction gear which was very much of a success.

The deckhouse was changed to boom boat style with the wheelhouse aft. The not-too-large galley of the old deckhouse, together with its coal stove and five gallon water barrel were not used. In 1951 Puget Sound Tug & Barge sold her to Doc Freeman. As far as I can tell dad sold her to Pat Stoppelman, his son-in-law, in 1953. Pat did the Stimpson Mill dirt boom towing with her as well as other jobs. Pat sold her back to Doc in 1956. I remember using her all the time when I did towing jobs for dad after I went into the Coast Guard. At the Grays Harbor Lifeboat Station we worked 6 days on and 2 days off. So I would drive home and do towing jobs for dad and make a few bucks because the Coast Guard was overpaying me at about a hundred dollars a month so that worked out really well. I always kidded about going in the Coast Guard, that all I did was take drop in pay and change uniforms as I was towing for them.  One day I was backing the CHRISTIE R out of the hole at Dock 6 and I was spinning the steering wheel and I clipped my chin and almost knocked myself out, chipping my four front teeth. Boy, was my mother upset. Dad sold her to Bob Burns of Everett on March 12, 1956.

CHRISTY R WITH HER ORIGINAL HOUSE.

CHRISTIE R WITH HER ORIGINAL HOUSE, THANKS TO JIM CARY

 

CHRISTY R GOING UP THE DUWAMISH RIVER WITH CARY-DAVIS ON THE SIDE OF HER HULL. THANKS TO JIM CARY.

CHRISTIE R GOING UP THE DUWAMISH RIVER WITH CARY-DAVIS ON THE SIDE OF HER HULL. THANKS TO JIM CARY.

 

JACK McCRARY ON BOW OF CHRISTY R AT OUR GAS PLANT YARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

JACK McCRARY ON BOW OF CHRISTIE R AT OUR GAS PLANT YARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

I AM GETTING READY TO SHIFT PAT'S METEOR WITH THE CHRISTY R. PAT STOPPELMAN PHOTO.

MARK  IS GETTING READY TO SHIFT PAT’S METEOR WITH THE CHRISTIE R.   PAT STOPPELMAN PHOTO.

 

MARK IN THE PILOT HOUSE OF THE CHRISTY R. PAT STOPPELMAN PHOTO.

MARK FREEMAN IN THE PILOT HOUSE OF THE CHRISTIE R. PAT STOPPELMAN PHOTO.

 

TUGS ON DOCK 6 CHRISTY R FIRST THEN JERKMORE AND ALONGSIDE IS THE SAND DAB 2 DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

TUGS ON DOCK 6:  FIRST THE CHRISTIE R  THEN JERKMORE AND ALONGSIDE IS THE SAND DAB 2.   DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

JACL AND I TOWED THIS ARMY BARGE HOME THAT DAD HAD JUST BOUGHT WHILE ON LIBERY.

JACK McCRARY AND MARK FREEMAN (WHILE ON LIBERTY) TOWED THIS ARMY BARGE HOME WITH THE CHRISTIE R THAT DOC HAD JUST BOUGHT.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

Tug CLIMAX: official number 238049; 7 tons gross, 5 tons net. Registered length 34.1′ x 9.9′ x 4.2′. Built in 1901 at San Francisco, CA. with 110 horsepower. Dad got her in trade when he sold the ADELPHUS  to Jake Secor - as far as I can tell looking at the records. When Leiter Hockett bought her in 1939 from Libby McNeil & Libby, she had a two cylinder 30 horsepower Atlas gas engine.  When we got her she had a beautiful 4-71 GM diesel. Evidently General Construction had re-engined her. Dad said ‘Well, I can sell the engine real quick and I have a 100 horsepower Superior that will do just fine.’  So out came the Jimmy and in went the Superior. The Superior was a lower compression engine and it smoked all the time. When I was at the Grays Harbor Lifeboat Station the fellow that dad sold her to was taking fishing charters out of Westport and you could see her smoke on the horizon and know right where she was. They used to kid me at the station and want to know if that was a Freeman boat. I helped clean her up and paint her and I have a couple of photos of her out of water at Seth Greens with Jack McCrary and I painting her bottom and changing propellers. A funny story about dad running her: one day he was out with the CLIMAX so he decided to stop by Pat & Merry’s houseboat. The CLIMAX had a funny gear shift, it was a horizontal lever and if you pulled up on it you were in reverse or in go-ahead… no one could ever remember which… and we forgot to write it down. So dad goes up the row of houseboats and bumps Jimmy Wandesfords houseboat because he could not remember which direction was ahead or astern. Of course it cracked the fireplace and that did not make Jimmy too happy, but that got fixed up. Dad was a good boat handler, maybe a bit too quick, but there’s a lesson about writing things down somewhere in there.

CLIMAX IN 1939 WHEN LIETER HOCKETT OWNED HER.

CLIMAX IN 1939 WHEN LEITER HOCKETT OWNED HER.

 

VLIMAX BEFOR WE CLEANED HER UP. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

CLIMAX BEFORE WE CLEANED HER UP. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CLIMAX IN SETH GREENS DRYDOCK JACK AND I ARE WORKING ON HER CHANGING WHEELS IS THINK. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

CLIMAX IN SETH GREENS DRYDOCK. JACK AND MARK ARE WORKING ON HER – CHANGING WHEELS, I THINK. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

MARK WORKING ON SHEEL NOTIOCE A FRESH COAT OF BOTTOM PAINT. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

MARK WORKING ON THE WHEEL. NOTICE THE FRESH COAT OF BOTTOM PAINT.   DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

TUG  CREST:  (ex-CHRIS FOSS)  Official number  224666; 35 gross tons, 35 net tons; registered  length 51.2′ x 13.9′ x 8.8′. Built in 1925 for Wagner Towboat  as the CREST and sold to Foss Launch and Tug in 1937 and renamed CHRIS FOSS.  Foss sold her to W. H. Wertz on August 27, 1956 and he, in turn, sold her to Doc Freeman on Oct 10, 1956 and then Doc sold her and an engine to Charlie Jacobs on March 1, 1957 who renamed her CREST. Doc took the tug ATLAS in trade. Charlie was in the log towing business.  When Foss sold her she had been laid up for several years after going ashore on Dungeness Spit and straining her hull. Foss also removed the main engine. When Charlie Jacobs decided to retire from the towing business he contacted me about selling the CREST. I told him to run her over and I would handle the sale of her at Fremont Boat. Either in 1967 or 1968, I sold her to Mr. George Perreault of Portland, Oregon and George ran her down the coast. Her original engine was a 156 horsepower Eastern Standard diesel; then she had a 200 horsepower Fairbanks Morse and her last engine was a D-17000 Cat of 150 Horsepower with a 3:1 reduction gear. Her most famous incident was when she and the KINGFISHER were towing a huge raft of logs of about 1,000,000 board feet from British Columbia and they got set down on top of Atkins Reef and the tide went out leaving both tugs high and almost dry. They tied the tugs together and it worked! They stayed upright, but it made for great pictures. When the tide flooded enough, off they went with their log raft for Seattle. The KINGFISHER became the MYRTLE FOSS. As far as I can tell this happened during the early 1930s. CREST was one of three near sisters which were the CREOSOTE and the MALOLO, Duke Coolidge hull design  with a “mackerel tail and cod head”. The CREST had a 6 cylinder 9 x 12 -156 horsepower Eastern Standard diesel. MALOLO & CREOSOTE both had 10 x 12 ½  Fairbanks Morse two-cycle base scavenging 210 Horsepower @ 360 RPMs & 240 horsepower @ 400 RPM. I towed the CHRIS FOSS home from her moorings at Kenneydale while on liberty from the Grays Harbor Lifeboat station with a fellow Coast Guardsman, Roland E. Miller Jr (BM2) as my deckhand, that was my side job when I was in the Coast Guard.

CREST BEING BUILT IN 1925.

CREST BEING BUILT IN 1925.

CREST IN THE SHIP CANAL AT THE TOWN OF FREMONT.

CREST IN THE SHIP CANAL AT THE TOWN OF FREMONT.

 

CREST IN THE LOCKS IN 1931 JOE WILLIAMSON PHOTO. THANKS JOE.

CREST IN THE LOCKS IN 1931 JOE WILLIAMSON PHOTO. THANKS JOE.

 

CREST WITH LOG TOW JUST OUTSIDE THE LOCKS.

CREST WITH LOG TOW JUST OUTSIDE THE LOCKS.

 

CREST & KINGFISHER ASHORE ON ATKINS REEF.

CREST & KINGFISHER ASHORE ON ATKINS REEF.

CREST ASHORE.

CREST ASHORE.

 

CREST & KINGFISHER AGROUND ON ATKINS REEF.

CREST & KINGFISHER AGROUND ON ATKINS REEF.

 

C.C.CHEERY - CREST - VENTURE PULLING ON BIG LOG RAFT.

C.C. CHEERY – CREST – VENTURE PULLING ON BIG LOG RAFT.

 

CREST PULLING ALONGSIDE LOG RAFT.

CREST PULLING ALONGSIDE LOG RAFT.

 

DHRIS FOSS ABOUT 1940. ROBIN PATERSON COLLECTION.

CHRIS FOSS ABOUT 1940. ROBIN PATERSON COLLECTION.

 

TOWING CHRIS FOSS HOME. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

TOWING CHRIS FOSS HOME. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CREST IN UPPER PASRT OF PHOTO WHEN I HAD HER FOR SALE.

CREST IN UPPER PART OF PHOTO WHEN MARK FREEMAN HAD HER FOR SALE.

 

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SOME MODERN PHOTOS TAKEN IN FEBRUARY.

GATOR IN THE WATER AND SHE FLOATS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

GATOR IN THE WATER AND SHE FLOATS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

DIXIE WITH WASSILIE B ALONGSIDE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

DIXIE WITH WASSILIE B ALONGSIDE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

FLOATING HOME TOW. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

FLOATING HOME TOW. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

WESTERN'S PACIFIC TITAN IN DRYDOCK AT FOSS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

WESTERN’S PACIFIC TITAN IN DRYDOCK AT FOSS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

PACIFIC KNIGHT AT FOSS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

PACIFIC KNIGHT AT FOSS. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

DIXIE AND NEW VUNTURE AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD.ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

DIXIE AND NEW VENTURE AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

            IN DRYDOCK AT STABBERT YACHT & SHIP. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

MIST COVE IN DRYDOCK AT STABBERT YACHT & SHIP. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

NEW PIILOT  BOAT ASTORIA BEING LAUNCHED AT KVICHAK. WE HANDLED THE FOSS 300 CRANE BARGE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

NEW PIILOT BOAT ASTORIA BEING LAUNCHED AT KVICHAK. WE HANDLED THE FOSS 300 CRANE BARGE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

DIXIE WITH FOSS 300 STEAM CRANE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

DIXIE WITH FOSS 300 STEAM CRANE. ERIK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CROWLEY'S SEA VOYAGER. ERIK FREMAN PHOTO.

CROWLEY’S SEA VOYAGER. ERIK FREMAN PHOTO.

 

GENERAL ASSISTING NEW VENTURE AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

GENERAL  LEE  ASSISTING NEW VENTURE AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

DIXIE MAKING UP TO NEW VENTURE TO UNDOCK HER AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

DIXIE MAKING UP TO NEW VENTURE TO UNDOCK HER AT NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

TOMS KIDS LEARNING THE TUGBOAT BUSINESS. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

TOM’S KIDS LEARNING THE TUGBOAT BUSINESS. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

NEW VENTURE UNDERWAY FOR BALLARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

NEW VENTURE UNDERWAY FOR BALLARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

MARGIE AND INDY. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

MARGIE AND INDY. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

BLUE MOON HEADED FOR BALLARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

BLUE MOON HEADED FOR BALLARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

DIXIE WITH BLUE MOON STERN FIRST THEY TOW BETTER THAT WAY. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

DIXIE WITH BLUE MOON STERN FIRST – THEY TOW BETTER THAT WAY. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

MARGIE AND I WERE HAVING A SATURDAY LUNCH AT ARNIES IN EDMONDS AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE TO TOUR THE BOAT YARD AND WE FOUND THE R.A.McDONALD OUT ON THE HARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

MARGIE AND I WERE HAVING A SATURDAY LUNCH AT ARNIES IN EDMONDS AND OF COURSE YOU HAVE TO TOUR THE BOAT YARD AND WE FOUND THE R.A. McDONALD OUT ON THE HARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

GREG MAGNESON'S REDWOOD CITY PUSHING ONE AHEAD.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

GREG MAGNUSON’S REDWOOD CITY PUSHING ONE AHEAD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

SANDY & MISS BLUE CELEBRATING THEIR BIRTHDAYS. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

SANDY & MISS BLUE CELEBRATING THEIR BIRTHDAYS. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

DIZIE & GENERAL LEE LANDING FOSS NO. 300 AT WILSON MARINE TO LIFT OLD DRYDOCK OUT. PATTY BISHOP PHOTO.

DIXIE & GENERAL LEE LANDING FOSS NO. 300 AT WILSON MARINE TO LIFT OLD DRYDOCK OUT. PATTI BISHOP PHOTO.

 

FOSS NO. 300 GETTING READY TO LEFT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

FOSS NO. 300 GETTING READY TO LIFT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

FOSS NO. 300 LIFTING 50 FOOT DRYDOCK AND THEN WE TOOK HER DOWN TO THE OLD MARITIME SHIPYARD SITE TO UNLOAD IT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

FOSS NO. 300 LIFTING 50 FOOT DRYDOCK AND THEN WE TOOK HER DOWN TO THE OLD MARITIME SHIPYARD SITE TO UNLOAD IT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

I WAS ON THE END OF THE DOCK WHEN THE NOTORIOUS WENT BY HEADED FOR NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

I WAS ON THE END OF THE DOCK WHEN THE NOTORIOUS WENT BY HEADED FOR NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

SURFMAN'S BADGE.

SURFMAN’S BADGE.

 

 

HALIBUT  SCHOONER  PARADE  DAY. – THANKS ERIK!

 

HALIBUT SCHOONERS COMIONG THRU THE FREMONT BRIDGE. ALL PHOTOS TAKEN BY ERIK FREEMAN.

HALIBUT SCHOONERS COMING THRU THE FREMONT BRIDGE. ALL PHOTOS TAKEN BY ERIK FREEMAN

 

SEYMOUR.

SEYMOUR

 

GRANT.

GRANT.

 

POLARIS.

GRANT.

 

SEYMOUR.

SEYMOUR

 

 

KRISTIANA.

KRISTIANA.

 

 

EVENING STAR.

EVENING STAR.

 

 

ST JOHN II.

ST JOHN II.

 

 

MEMORIES.

MEMORIES.

 

 

SEYMOUR TIE UP AT SOUTH LAKE UNION AT THE CENTER FOR WOODEN BOATS. THANKS FOR TAKING ALL THE PHOTOS ERIK.

SEYMOUR TIED UP AT SOUTH LAKE UNION AT THE CENTER FOR WOODEN BOATS. THANKS FOR TAKING ALL THE PHOTOS ERIK.

 

Image (12)

OUR MAN ON WHIDBEY ISLAND, STAN WILLHIGHT, SENDS ON THESE

GREAT BLACK & WHITE PHOTOS.

 

8-23-1989  CAPE JAMES AT VANCOUVER BC.

8-23-1989 CAPE JAMES AT VANCOUVER BC.

 

8-23-1989  CAPE JAMES- IVANHOE- CANMAR TINGEAK. AT VANCOUVER B.C.

8-23-1989 CAPE JAMES- IVANHOE- CANMAR TINGEAK. AT VANCOUVER B.C.

 

8-23-1989   SMITTY NO. 1 AT NEW WESTMINSTER.

8-23-1989 SMITTY NO. 1 AT NEW WESTMINSTER.

 

8-23-1989  SWIFTSURE IV AT NEW WESTMINSTER.

8-23-1989 SWIFTSURE IV AT NEW WESTMINSTER.

 

9-20-1989  WESTMINSTER CHINOOK AT NEW WESTMINSTER.

9-20-1989 WESTMINSTER CHINOOK AT NEW WESTMINSTER.

 

8-23-1989  RED FIR 15 AT NEW WESTMINSTER.

8-23-1989 RED FIR 15 AT NEW WESTMINSTER.

 

9-28-2013  SEASPAN KING AT PORT TOWNSEND AT FIRST LIGHT.

9-28-2013 SEASPAN KING AT PORT TOWNSEND AT FIRST LIGHT.

 

10-3-1989  A RIV-TOW DUSTY IN TOW I THINK A SWIFTSURE TUG---ANY IDEAS?

10-3-1989 A RIV-TOW DUSTY IN TOW I THINK A SWIFTSURE TUG—ANY IDEAS?

THANKS STAN I LOVE THOSE CANADIAN BOATS.

125 YEAR PIN

OLYMPIA TUGBOAT RACING PHOTOS BY SCOTT SCHOCH.

 

 $ 18 MY TUG SOVEREIGN SHE SURE WASNT VERY FAST BUT A GOOD PULLER-4 6-71 GM DIESELS AND TWO 58 INCH PROPS.


MARK FREEMAN’S  TUG SOVEREIGN SHE SURE WASNT VERY FAST BUT A GOOD PULLER WITH FOUR 6-71 GM DIESELS AND TWO 58 INCH PROPS.

 

# 20  STEVE TATES ELF PASSING THE SOVEREIGN.

# 20 STEVE TATE’S ELF PASSING THE SOVEREIGN.

# 21  ELF-GARY DUFFS MERILYN & PETE WHITERYS BLUEBERRY. GARY AND PETE GOT THEIR TWO BOATS HUNG UP ON THE TIRES AND GARY COULD NOT SLOW DOWN BECAUSE ART ZIMMERMAN HAD  A 3 FOOT WRECH ON THE GOVERNER. NO DAMAGE DONE BUT IT MADE FOR GREAT PHOTOS.

THE ELF, GARY DUFFS MERILYN  AND PETE WHITTIER’S BLUEBERRY. GARY AND PETE GOT THEIR TWO BOATS HUNG UP ON THEIR TIRES AND GARY COULD NOT SLOW DOWN BECAUSE ART ZIMMERMAN HAD A 3 FOOT WRECH ON THE GOVERNOR. NO DAMAGE DONE BUT IT MADE FOR GREAT PHOTOS.

 

# 27 ARTHUR FOSS

ARTHUR FOSS

# 28 ARTHUR FOSS.

ARTHUR FOSS.

SCOTT’S PHOTOS ARE FROM AN ALBUM THAT ROBIN PATERSON MADE, THAT’S WHY THEY ALL

HAVE A NUMBER. SCOTT TAKES GREAT PHOTOS AND RUNS BIG TUGS FOR DUNLAP.

scan0008

OUR MAN IN COOS BAY, BOB RICHARDSON, SENDS ON THESE PHOTOS FROM

HILLY ( BIG WAVES ) COUNTRY.

 

NORTH BEND HEADED OUT TO TAKE CHARLIE OR GEORGE OFF A SHIP.

NORTH BEND HEADED OUT TO TAKE CHARLIE OR GEORGE OFF A SHIP.

 

JACK BRUSCO IN BACKGROUND CG 47 FEET SURF BOAT IN FORE GROUND.

JACK BRUSCO IN BACKGROUND CG 47 FEET SURF BOAT IN FOREGROUND.

 

EDWARD BRUSCO HEADED OUT.

EDWARD BRUSCO HEADED OUT.

 

EDWARD BRUSCO AND LOG BARGE.

EDWARD BRUSCO AND LOG BARGE.

 

THEY HAVE NEW BOARDING PLATFORMS FOR THE PILOTS ON BOTH THE NORTH BEND AND THE COOS BAY.

THEY HAVE NEW BOARDING PLATFORMS FOR THE PILOTS ON BOTH THE NORTH BEND AND THE COOS BAY.

 

SAUSE TUG HEADED FOR HAWAII KNUTSON TUG ASSISTING.

SAUSE TUG HEADED FOR HAWAII KNUTSON TUG ASSISTING.

 

CAPT. GUS BEAUDRY MOVING IN TO PICK UP PILOT.

CAPT. GUS BEAUDRY MOVING IN TO PICK UP PILOT.

 

KNUTSON ASSIST TUG.

KNUTSON ASSIST TUG.

 

SCAN-3

 

 

Thanks to all of you who send in pictures and facts so that I can share the information one photo at a time.    Anything that you send me, I can scan and send back to you good as new.

WANTED:

  1.  Crowley decals and cloth patches for jackets or caps.  The one I really like says “Red Stack Tugs”.

  2.  Old Cary-Davis & Puget Sound Tug & Barge photos & advertisements.

  3.  Old cannery tender & log towing photos.

  4.  We buy old tug and waterfront photos or collections and snapshots, as well as old (pre-1946) Marine Digest Magazines in any condition.

  5.  Information wanted: in an article in the Yachting magazine, it stated that Doc Freeman bought a tug named LEWIS II in 1943. He got her from Bellingham Tug & Barge,  I can’t seem to track her down – any idea??

  6. Need to know where the cannery tender HOWCAN went ashore in 1947.

  7. Want builders plate off the Coast Guard Cutter BONHAM.  I gave it to Jim Valentyne after dad bought the BONHAM.

 

All the best from:

 Mark & Margie Freeman, Captains Erik & Tom, Miss Blue, Richie, The Mark Freeman Maritime Museum,

Tatoosh Towing & Salvage, Fremont Boat Co.,  Fremont Tugboat Co. and the three cats; Braveheart (Indy), Razz

And Batman (all three cats came from a no-kill shelter about 4 years ago,)

P.S.: If you want to send me an e-mail please use mark@fremonttugboat.com  Thank you Fairtide Mark.

scan0003

THE VAMOOSE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments (0)


MARK FREEMAN’S “RUDDERLESS” FOR FEBRUARY 16, 2014

FB USE Rudderless heading 12-6-12 scan0001

CAPTAIN MARK

CAPTAIN MARK

GENERAL LEE MEETING THE SEA VOYAGER. KYLE STUBBS PHOTO.
GENERAL LEE MEETING THE SEA VOYAGER. TOM, YOU HAVE TO START SMALL.  KYLE STUBBS PHOTO.

      Keith Sternberg was looking for info on the ESTEBETH. Karl House sent in info from McCurdy’s History and several copies of negatives from the Puget Sound Maritime Historical Society. “In 1918 the 70 ton gas passenger and freight boat ESTEBETH 55 feet long, with 80 horsepower Frisco Standard engine, was built at Tacoma for local mail and passenger service by Davis & Kaser from Juneau. In 1921 she was repowered with a 90 horsepower Atlas Imperial Diesel.” Thanks Karl, I wonder what happened to her?

"ESTEBETH" FROM KEITH STERNBERG.

“ESTEBETH” FROM KEITH STERNBERG.

          Ric Shrewsbury of Western Towboat reports that his dad, Bob senior, owned the ARGOS for part of 1966 when Bob Sr. took her in trade as part of the deal when Leroy Dry bought the TRIUMPH from them. The ARGOS  was sold and the new owners were taking her to Wrangell, Alaska when she hit something in Stikine Straits and she sank. Thanks Ric.

 

TRIUMPH 300 HP WASHINGTON. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION

TRIUMPH 300 HP WASHINGTON. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION

 

DAD REALLY LIKED IT WHEN I PAINTED UP HIS BOATS. "ARGOS"N THE END OF DOCK 1 AT FREMONT BOAT CO.

DAD REALLY LIKED IT WHEN I PAINTED UP HIS BOATS. “ARGOS”AT THE END OF DOCK 1 AT FREMONT BOAT CO.

 

            Gary King and several others sent me info on the sinking in Canada of the ELF (ex-Foss 15).  She sunk the first time in Squamish and the second time the Coast Guard was having her towed back to Vancouver and she sunk in very deep water off Point Atkinson. Sad to see the old boats go, I wish that they could go on forever but they are just like us  – they wear out.

 

EMAIL FROM GARY KING.PHOTO BY DARRYL SCHWANKE.

ELF – EMAILED FROM GARY KING.  PHOTO BY DARRYL SCHWANKE.

STEAM TUG ELF BECAME THE DIESEL TUG FOSS NO. 15 POWERED BY A 210 HP WESTERN ENTERPRISE. PHOTO FROM ROB PATERSON COLLECTION

STEAM TUG ELF BECAME THE DIESEL TUG FOSS NO. 15 POWERED BY A 210 HP WESTERN ENTERPRISE. PHOTO FROM ROB PATERSON COLLECTION

 

FOSS NO. 15 GOT A 240 HP WASHINGTON IN 1960.

FOSS NO. 15 GOT A 240 HP WASHINGTON IN 1960.  FOSS SOLD HER AFTER 52 YEARS OF SERVICE. OTHER NAMES THAT SHE HAD WERE KARLYH AND SKOOKUM CASH AND STEVE TATE REPOWERED HER WITH A 350 HP CAT.    ROB PATERSON PHOTO.

 

MARGIE & I TOOK THIS PHOTO OF THE ELF JUST ENTERING PORT LUDLOW.

MARGIE & I TOOK THIS PHOTO OF THE ELF JUST ENTERING PORT LUDLOW.

 

            Speaking of old tugs by now I think the CHICKAMAUGA is probably in Port Townsend where they are going to haul her out of water and probably break her up. Although I did see a mention about some people in Poulsbo that were talking about preserving her and that would be very expensive. Of course she has a different house on her than when she was the first full diesel tugboat in the United States. She had a fire when she belonged to Pacific Towboat (Foss) in Everett and they built a new two story house  and a put in a 500 HP Cat. We will watch.  Too bad somebody did not install an automatic bilge pump in her. The state is changing the laws and now they have criminal charges as well as civil charges on derelict boats. My friend Ben Sias got inside her for a look see before she left and he said it was pretty sad.

If they do scrap her, I would buy name boards or racing mementos to preserve the history.

CHICKAMAUGA LEAVING EAGLE HARBOR. PHOTO BAINBRIDGE ISLAND REVIEW.

CHICKAMAUGA LEAVING EAGLE HARBOR. PHOTO BAINBRIDGE ISLAND REVIEW.

CHICKAMAUGA WITH HER ORIGINAL HOUSE. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION

CHICKAMAUGA WITH HER ORIGINAL HOUSE. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION

                 Since I did the article on the OCEAN MAID I have received a photo of her in Ketchikan from Kyle Stubbs. It turns out that John Clark’s dad used to run the OCEAN MAID. And, John Clark was in the Coast Guard and he sent along a picture of the CG Cutter SWIVEL that he was running in Maine.

My man in Maine, Bill Page, found her name board in a store in Boston and arranged for me to buy it and now it is in my office. Thanks Bill  – we now call you old Eagle Eye and that’s probably the nicest thing we call you. Bill has been a great friend over the years and we have had a lot of fun with him. Margie and I even visited he and Paula when we were back east.—Thanks Bill.

OCEAN MAID IN KETCHIKAN PHOTO BY KYLE STUBBS.

OCEAN MAID IN KETCHIKAN.  PHOTO BY KYLE STUBBS.

 

MY NEW NAME BOARD. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

MY NEW NAME BOARD. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

CGC SWIVEL.

CG Cutter SWIVEL.

 

DONALD R is for sale $539,000.  She is another Buz Dana rebuild and  just beautiful. – need I say more? Contact United Yacht Sales. [unitedyacht.com]

DONALD R.

DONALD R.

Another tug for sale is the 45 foot R.A. McDonald for $19,950. Call Bryan Taylor at 206-639-9573.

 

R.A. McDONALD.

R.A. McDONALD.

 

Cliff Centers tug RELIABLE has been chosen as logo tug for the Olympia Tug Boat Races 2014.

 

"RELIABLE"
“RELIABLE”  SCOTT SCHOCH PHOTO.

 

Harley Marine Services has purchased the BRATT for training Mates and Captains for their tug boat company. BRATT is the latest word in technology having two Z-drive units and was designed by Ron Burchett and Rob Allen hence the name.

BRATT- HARLEY'S NEW TRAINING TUG.

BRATT- HARLEY’S NEW TRAINING TUG.

The tug SILVER BAY II sank at Wrangell, Alaska. She was built as the JULIA FOSS.

 

JULIA FOSS 1989 PHOTO BY MARK fREEMAN

JULIA FOSS 1989.  PHOTO BY MARK FREEMAN

 

My dad, “Doc”, bought and sold boats and everything else. He owned a great number of tugs - some he used in his business, others he bought and sold, some he sold on consignment. He bought and sold well over a thousand regular boats including several  sailing ships,  freighters,  yachts, tugs,  ferry boats and thousands of surplus vessels,  landing barges, motor launches,  skiffs,  dorys,  yard oilers, freighters, deck barges, Coast Guard cutters –  if it floated Doc had something to do with it.  I also owned several tugs and there is a story and pictures about a lot of them.

I thought that I should start putting them down in print as I am reaching my 80th birthday next month. I have kept all the files that I could lay my hands on.  It takes six large file drawers that contain dad’s info on his boat deals.  Dad died in December 1963 when he was only 60. Any new info that you have,  please pass it on to me. Some boats we have just a photo, others are mentioned in trade journals - and we don’t have hardly any files before WW II and almost no photos during the war except for the trade magazines.

O.H."DOC" FREEMAN.

O.H.”DOC” FREEMAN.

EPISODE 2

TUG –  ADELPHUS.   Offical Number: 208834,  Gross: 31 tons,  Net: 21 tons,  56.2  feet registered length,  beam was 13.1 and depth was 6’8″.  She was built in 1911 at Seattle. She was built as a tender for the Shaw Island Packing Company. That is why her pilot house was so far aft. The forward cabin was added at a later date and the fish hold was converted to quarters and a small house was built on top of it.

In April 1924 CAPT. William P  Thornton started up the San Juan Tugboat Co with the tug ADELPHUS. The Marine Digest featured the ADELPHUS on the front cover and had this article about her and I quote from March 28, 1927. “The tugboat ADELPHUS of the Elliot Bay Towing Company which appears in the port hole of this issue, was hauled out at the plant of the King Shipbuilding Company last week and underwent seasonal overhauling. She is often referred to as ” The biggest little tug on Puget Sound.” Recently she towed eight sections of logs containing 500,000 feet from the Cascade Boom in Tacoma to Elliot Bay in less the 12 hours. The ADELPHUS is commanded by her owner Capt. William P. Thornton veteran Puget Sound steamboat master. Clifford Roundtree is engineer and Fred Dells is mate. She is powered with a 100-horsepower Fairbanks-Morse C-O engine.”

At some point Elliott Bay Towing and Elliott Bay Mill Company ended up as her owner and that is who dad bought her from, I think. He sold her to E. J. Secor (Jake if I remember correctly) and the customs house bill of sale and installment note were dated May 12, 1952.  He took in trade the tug CLIMAX but that’s another story.  She left for Southeast Alaska and was never seen or heard of again and all hands were lost as far as we know.

ADELPHUS ON THE FRONT COVER OF THE MARINE DIGEST. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION

ADELPHUS ON THE FRONT COVER OF THE MARINE DIGEST. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION

at some

ADELPHUS MAKING SOOT BALLS. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

ADELPHUS MAKING SOOT BALLS. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

 

ADELPHUS STILL MAKING SOOT BALLS  D-O FAIRBANKS WERE A SEMI DIESEL. HERE SHE IS OFF 4-MILE ROCK WITH ALOG TOW.  MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

ADELPHUS STILL MAKING SOOT BALLS. A  C-O FAIRBANKS WERE A SEMI-DIESEL. HERE SHE IS OFF 4-MILE ROCK WITH A LOG TOW IN JUNE OF 1938.    MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

APRIL 9, 1952 LETTER FRO, ROBERT E. LANDWEER-CUSTOM HOUSE BROKER. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

APRIL 9, 1952 LETTER FROM  ROBERT E. LANDWEER, CUSTOM HOUSE BROKER. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

 

TUG CLIMAX. DAD TOOK HER IN TRADE AS PART OF THE SALE OF THE ADELPHUS. LIETER HOCKETT COLLLECTION.

TUG CLIMAX. DAD TOOK HER IN TRADE AS PART OF THE SALE OF THE ADELPHUS. LIETER HOCKETT COLLLECTION.

TUG –  ATLAS:    ON: 206377,  Gross: 19 tons,  Net: 13 tons,  46.2 x 11.6 x 5 feet.  Built 1909 at Harper, WA. Dad got the ATLAS when he sold the ex-CHRIS FOSS hull  (CREST)  to Charlie Jacobs on February 19, 1957 but that’s another story. The ATLAS was a dandy little tug all clean and painted nicely. Charlie used her for towing log rafts from the Port Ludlow log storage to the Pope & Talbot Mill at Port Gamble. She had a model 844 Buda Diesel and was about 140 horsepower. He would take 20 sections and catch the flood into Gamble. Dad used her for a short time and liked her very much  – she was quiet and handled good. But true of what dad did best he sold her to Don Morris of Ketron Island on March 19, 1957 so he didn’t have her very long. I don’t know who did it but she was made into a yacht and painted all white.

 

CHRIS FOSS EX CREST, ROLAND E. MILLER JR AND I TOWED HER HOME WITH THE JOHN L.C. WHEN WE WERE ON LIBERTY FROM THE GRAYS HARBOR LIFEBOAT STATION IN NOV. 1956

CHRIS FOSS (EX-CREST). ROLAND E. MILLER JR AND I TOWED HER HOME WITH THE JOHN L.C. WHEN WE WERE ON LIBERTY FROM THE GRAYS HARBOR LIFEBOAT STATION IN NOV. 1956

TUG - ATLAS. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION

TUG – ATLAS. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION

 

ATLAS CONVERTED TO A YACHT. TOM BARTLET PHOTO.

ATLAS CONVERTED TO A YACHT. TOM BARTLET PHOTO.

TUG – ATKA:   ON: 216326, Gross tons: 31, Net tons: 21, 53.6 x 16.1 x 5.7 built in 1918.  I have in the file a letter to dad dated November 4, 1950 from Kotzebue Sound Lighterage Co.  Dad had sent them a photo of the boat and they were returning it so what went on I have no way of knowing.  Then I have a receipt where dad bought the ATKA from Donald Erickson a medical doctor whose hobby was buying old boats and fixing them up. When I was selling boats Dr. Erickson and I made a lot of deals. Dad sold the ATKA to Ragnvald Johnson of Port Angeles on July 20, 1956. I also know that Trafton in Anacortes had her for a while.  She had a pair of D-6 Superior Diesels, 170 horsepower at 1500 rpm’s and 112 horsepower at 1200 rpm’s with  3:1 reduction gears. The engines were rebuilt and installed in October, 1949. She was about 58 feet overall.

I remember that I was thinking of buying her and going into the general towing business which would be log towing before I went into the Coast Guard. It was mandatory that you went into some service - it was called the draft. So I didn’t buy her. On the back of one of her photos I had written “I almost bought her to do log towing when I was a kid before I went into the Coast Guard. She had two Superiors.” And then there was a P.S. and it said “It was just as well. I knew after I left the University of Washington that I would get an 1-A draft notice and didn’t need a big boat that I couldn’t run and be gone for four years.”

 

TUG = ATKA. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

TUG ATKA.   MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

TUG – ACTIVE:

I have no way of knowing whether dad bought and sold her or if she was a consignment boat. The Merchant Vessels Registry show two boat named ACTIVE that are about the same size so there is no way that I can identify her. I have a Pacific Motor Boat Magazine story about dad fixing up the MONROE and at the end of the story and I quote. ” In fact, we’re making another Chrysler installation with a 5-to-1 reduction in the ACTIVE, also a former shrimp boat similar in size to the MONROE.” That is the only mention that I have ever seen about the ACTIVE.

 Dad fixed up the MONROE and made a juggle boat out of her. Dad was sold on the Chryslers and their reduction gears for replacing old oil engines a 115 horsepower Chrysler Crown would swing a 40 inch propeller on a 5 to 1 gear. The Murray & Tregurtha units had a 9 to 1 gear and they swung a 48 x 48 inch wheel on a Chrysler Royal engine of 141 horsepower. Quick to install and parts were available.

 

TUG ACTIVE, TIED UP ON DOCK 1 NICE LOOKING LITTLE TUG.  MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

TUG ACTIVE, TIED UP ON DOCK 1. NICE LOOKING LITTLE TUG. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

 

TUG ACTIVE TIED UP ON DOCK 4. IN THE BACKGROUND IS OUR OLD FERRYBOAT THAT WE LIVED ON THE AIRLINE. THE COAST GUARD TOOK HER IN 1942 FOR A BARRACKS SHIP THAT HELPS DATE THE PHOTO. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION

TUG ACTIVE TIED UP ON DOCK 1. IN THE BACKGROUND IS OUR OLD FERRYBOAT THAT WE LIVED ON – THE AIRLINE. WE MOVED HER THERE IN 1938 AND THE COAST GUARD TOOK HER IN 1942 FOR A BARRACKS SHIP SO THAT HELPS DATE THE PHOTO.  MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

TUG ACTIVE  OUT OF WATER ON HER GRID. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

TUG ACTIVE OUT OF WATER ON HER GRID. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

 TUG –  ARTHUR B. FITZPATRICK:   was named for my Grandpa Fitz who was a chief engineer and had an unlimited license in steam from the Coast Guard – any ocean, any tonnage. That means he could have run the QUEEN MARY! The little tug 30 feet long and 8 feet wide had been one of two sister work boats carried by the Bureau of Indian Affairs supply ship NORTH STAR. The two work boats had been used to ferry goods ashore in Alaska where there were no docks. When they came up for bid, dad bought one and Lloyd Frank bought the other one. Lloyd built her into a small tug and put in a 165 horsepower gas engine. Today she is known as the TWOBITTS and I think Elwood Avery still owns her as a pleasure boat. They were both open boats and ours had a 115 horsepower Chrysler Crown and we used her just they way she came for shifting all the big boats dad had at Northlake Boat Sales. I have photos that I took in May of 1959 when I towed the ATKINS over to Poulsbo.  I had Jim Vallentyne run her for me as an assist boat. Our friend and employee Jim Vallentyne and dad got to talking about making her into a steam boat. Frank Prothero donated a Model K Navy engine circa 1900  and Jim rebuilt it. They found a real Scotch Marine Boiler that would burn coal or wood. They installed the engine and boiler and fitted a rebuilt 24 inch diameter propeller and had the wheel repitched to 40 inches and it was just the right combination. We still used her as a tug but you had to build up steam before you could shift. We all had a lot of fun with her. We even took her to opening day in 1960 disguised as the AFRICAN QUEEN with empty cases of Gilbeys gin stacked on the back deck just like Humphrey Bogart would have done. Dad died in December of 1963 having just turned 60 and mother and I gave the steamboat to Jim Valentyne and his wife Loretta.  Jim and our old engineer, Edmund Anderson, built a house on her and renamed her the DAVID T. DENNY. Jim was later drowned on the Columbia River Bar trying to deliver a 50 foot Chris Craft from California to Seattle when a huge Pacific Storm caught him. The boat was sold and ended up in our moorage at Fremont Boat and I understand was shipped to Europe to do the canals and now is somewhere in the Eastern U.S.

 

FROM LEFT MURRAY AMOS, MARK FREEMAN, & JIM VALLENTYNE. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

FROM LEFT MURRAY AMOS, MARK FREEMAN, & JIM VALLENTYNE. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

MAY 1959 ASSIST BOAT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

MAY 1959 ASSIST BOAT. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

ARGOS WITH ATKINS ALONGSIDE. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

ARGOS WITH ATKINS ALONGSIDE. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION.

NAVY STEAM ENGINE CIRCA 1900. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

NAVY STEAM ENGINE CIRCA 1900. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

GETTING READY FOR A FUN DAY. FROM LEFT MURRAY AMOS. JIM & LORETTA VALENTYNE 7 MARK FREEMAN. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

GETTING READY FOR A FUN DAY. FROM LEFT MURRAY AMOS. JIM & LORETTA VALENTYNE & MARK FREEMAN. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

BLOWING OFF SOME STEAM. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

BLOWING OFF SOME STEAM. DOC FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

A RAINY DAY CRUISE ON LAKE UNION. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION

A RAINY DAY CRUISE ON LAKE UNION. MARK FREEMAN COLLECTION

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GENERAL LEE AND BOATS AFLOAT SHOW TOW. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

GENERAL LEE AND BOATS AFLOAT SHOW TOW. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

EVERYBODYS  HELPING JOE TYFANNY PHOTO

EVERYBODY’S PUSHING.  JOE TIFFANY PHOTO

 

CAPT. MARK IS DOING HIS PART. TOM BULSON PHOTO.

CAPT. MARK IS DOING HIS PART. TOM BULSON PHOTO.

 

MR B WENT BY. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

SAM B WENT BY. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

PEANUT  SNOW BOUND OF COURSE HE IS VERTICAL IMPARIED. MISS BLUE PHOTO.

PEANUT  – SNOW BOUND. GOOD THING THE SNOW DIDN’T GET DEEPER AS SHE IS VERTICAL IMPARIED. MISS BLUE PHOTO.

 

NEW BRIDGE TUG      FROM SAN FRANCISCO.  MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

NEW BRIDGE TUG TERILYN FROM SAN FRANCISCO. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO

 

BLACK CAT MAN CAPT. MARK.  MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

BLACK CAT MAN CAPT. MARK. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

DIXIE WITH

DIXIE WITH NEW VENTURE HEADED FOR NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD AND DRYDOCK # 2. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

FATHOM RUNNING BY. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

FATHOM RUNNING BY. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

GRACE ON A FOGGY MORNING. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

GRACE ON A FOGGY MORNING. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

BLUEBERRY FOG IS STILL  IN. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO. BILL WOUOLD CALL ME FOGGY.

BLUEBERRY - FOG IS STILL IN. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO. BILL WOULD SURELY CALL ME FOGGY.

 

DIXIE WITH HUSKY HEADED FOR BALLARD SHE JUST UNDOCKED FROM NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

DIXIE WITH HUSKY HEADED FOR BALLARD. SHE JUST UNDOCKED FROM NORTHLAKE SHIPYARD. MARK FREEMAN PHOTO.

 Margie and I drove out to the big model meet at Monroe one recent Saturday.  Every kind of boat and plane were there. Kevin had the big pool there so that everyone could run their radio controlled boats. Besides all the tugs and warships there was  a  three-masted sailing ship that looked like the VICTORY - a great lakes ship and Kevin was flying his helicopter over the water, so there was lots to see. We had never seen a model helicopter fly and what a treat that was. After a couple of hours it was way past lunch time so off to Anthony’s by the water in Everett for a little lunch treat. What a change – no logs in storage  – no log tugs coming down the river, it just looked like the dead sea. I have way too good a memory.

 

RON BURCHETT AND HELICOPTER. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

RON BURCHETT AND HELICOPTER. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

RON IN BACKGROUND AND HIS TUG ALAN B.  MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

RON IN BACKGROUND AND HIS TUG ALAN B. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

KEVINS HELICOPTER JUST FLEW OFF A BARGE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

KEVIN’S HELICOPTER JUST FLEW OFF A BARGE. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

ALAN B UP CLOSE MADE UP IN THE NOTCH. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

ALAN B UP CLOSE MADE UP IN THE NOTCH. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

ONE OF AMMIE ENGS BOATS, MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

ONE OF AMY ENG’S BOATs.    MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

UNKOWN PUSH BOAT BUT I WANT ONE JUST LIKE THIS. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

UNKOWN PUSH BOAT BUT I WANT ONE JUST LIKE THIS. MARGIE FREEMAN PHOTO.

 

Olympia Tugboat Race photos from the Rob Paterson Collection, Scott Schoch photos. Thanks Kae!

 

WINAMAC ROBIN HAS HER IN THE COMPANY CORNER. SCOTT SCHOCH PHOTO.

TUG WINAMAC- ROBIN HAS HER IN THE COMPANY CORNER. SCOTT SCHOCH PHOTO.

 

RELIANCE AND MALOLO FIGHTING IT OUT. SCOTT SCHOCH PHOTO.

RELIANCE AND MALOLO FIGHTING IT OUT. SCOTT SCHOCH PHOTO.

 

GREG MAGNUSON'S MALOLO WITH HER D 343 CAT. SCOTT SCHOCH PHOTO.

GREG MAGNUSON’S MALOLO WITH HER D 343 CAT. SCOTT SCHOCH PHOTO.

 

SHOBENS'S LILLIAN C. ALL BY HERSELF. SCOTT SHOCH PHOTO.

SCHOBENS’ LILLIAN C ALL BY HERSELF. DOES THAT MEAN THAT SHE IS AHEAD OF EVERYONE OR BEHIND?  SCOTT SHOCH PHOTO.

 

STEVE HAS THE ELF HOOKED ON TO BAD SHE IS GONE NOW. SCOTT SCHOCH PHOTO.

STEVE HAS THE ELF HOOKED ON;  TOO BAD SHE IS GONE NOW. SCOTT SCHOCH PHOTO.

 

MY SOVEREIGN WON A SEATTLE TUG RACE ONCE BUT SHE NEVER GOT CLOSE IN OLYMPIA BUT WE HAD GREAT FUN THREATENING EVERYONE. SCOTT SCHOCH PHOTO.

MY SOVEREIGN WON A SEATTLE TUG RACE ONCE BUT SHE NEVER GOT CLOSE IN OLYMPIA. WE DID HAVE GREAT FUN THREATENING EVERYONE!    SCOTT SCHOCH PHOTO.

Our man in Coos Bay, Bob Richardson, sends on these photos of Coos Bay traffic. Thanks Bob.

 

iISLAND SCOUT AND HER BIG CHIP BARGE HEADED OUT. KNUTSON ASSISTING. BOB RICHARDSON PHOTO.

ISLAND SCOUT AND HER BIG CHIP BARGE HEADED OUT. KNUTSON ASSISTING. BOB RICHARDSON PHOTO.

 

KNUTSON TUG RETURNING AFTER ASSISTING CHIP BARGE. BOB RICHARDSON PHOTO

KNUTSON TUG RETURNING AFTER ASSISTING CHIP BARGE. BOB RICHARDSON PHOTO

 

Captain Tom Bulson, our man on the DIXIE, sent me about 500 tug photos so I get to pick and choose what to show you.

FENDER MAKING IS ALMOST A LOST ART. TOM BULSON COLLECTION

FENDER MAKING IS ALMOST A LOST ART. TOM BULSON COLLECTION

THIS MIGHT BE GREG MAGNUSON'S RED WOOD CITY  WHEN HE BOUGHT HER IN CALIFORNIA.   TOM BULSON COLLECTION.

THIS MIGHT BE GREG MAGNUSON’S RED WOOD CITY WHEN HE BOUGHT HER IN CALIFORNIA. TOM BULSON COLLECTION.

A SEATTLE TUGBOAT RACE FROM SEFT TWO COAST GUARD 40 BOATS, THE WEDDEL FOSS MAKING ALL THAT SMOKE,      AND ON THE FAR RIGHT IS AMERICANS PETER. TOM BULSON COLLECTION.

A SEATTLE TUGBOAT RACE FROM 1953.    FROM LEFT: TWO COAST GUARD 40 BOATS, THE WEDELL FOSS MAKING ALL THAT SMOKE, THE GLEANER  AND ON THE FAR RIGHT IS AMERICAN’S PETER. TOM BULSON COLLECTION.
LOOKS LIKE CROWLEYS SEA QUEEN AND ONE OF THE NORTH SLOPE BARGES.  TOM BULSON COLLLECTION.

LOOKS LIKE CROWLEY’S SEA QUEEN (?) AND ONE OF THE NORTH SLOPE BARGES. TOM BULSON COLLLECTION.

 

WHAT A SAD SIGHT.  TOM BULSON COLLECTION

WHAT A SAD SIGHT. TOM BULSON COLLECTION

GREAT LAKES TUGS MAKING LOTS OF SMOKE AND STEAM. IF YOU DONT HAVE ENOUGH POWER JUST PUT ANOTHER TUG ON THE JOB.  TOM BULSON PHOTO.

GREAT LAKES TUGS MAKING LOTS OF SMOKE AND STEAM. IF YOU DON’T HAVE ENOUGH POWER JUST PUT ANOTHER TUG ON THE JOB. TOM BULSON PHOTO.

 

Our man on Whidbey Island, Stan Willhight, sends in these great black and white photos. Thanks Stan.

8-16-1989 JOSEPH R. IN THE LOCKS. SHE LOOKS TO BE AN EX MARINE LOGISTICS TUG?  STAN WILLHIGHT PHOTO.

8-16-1989 JOSEPH R. IN THE LOCKS. SHE LOOKS TO BE AN EX-MARINE LOGISTICS TUG(?) STAN WILLHIGHT PHOTO.

7-6-19989 SEA WENCH OUT ON THE HARD AT FISHING VESSEL OWNERS. MARINE DISCOVERERD AS BOYER TUG IN THE BACKGROUND. STAN WILLHIGHT PHOTO.

7-6-19989 SEA WINCH OUT ON THE HARD AT FISHING VESSEL OWNERS. MARINE DISCOVERER AND A BOYER TUG IN THE BACKGROUND. STAN WILLHIGHT PHOTO.

9-1-1989 STANDARD NO. 3 NEAR ANACORTES. STAN WILLHIGHT PHOTO.

9-1-1989 STANDARD NO. 3 NEAR ANACORTES. STAN WILLHIGHT PHOTO.

9-8-1989  TOM WHITE PUSHING A BARGE IN THE SWINOMISH SLOUGH.  STAN WILLHIGHT PHOTO.

9-8-1989 TOM WHITE PUSHING A BARGE IN THE SWINOMISH SLOUGH. STAN WILLHIGHT PHOTO.

9-20-1989 WESTMINSTER CHINOOK AT NEW WESTMINSTER B.C. STAN WILLHIGHT PHOTO.

9-20-1989 WESTMINSTER CHINOOK AT NEW WESTMINSTER B.C. STAN WILLHIGHT PHOTO.

10-31-1989 COMOX CROWN ON THE FRASER RIVER. STAN WILLHIGHT PHOTO.

10-31-1989 COMOX CROWN ON THE FRASER RIVER. STAN WILLHIGHT PHOTO.

 

THANKS TO ALL OF YOU WHO SEND IN PICTURES AND FACTS SO THAT I CAN SHARE THE INFORMATION ONE PHOTO AT A TIME. ANYTHING THAT YOU SEND ME, I CAN SCAN AND SEND BACK TO YOU GOOD AS NEW.

SOURCES THAT I HAVE AVAILABLE TO ME  (BESIDES EVERYTHING THAT I HAVE SAVED INCLUDING 150,000 PHOTOS AND MY SCRAP BOOKS AND FILES) ARE: JIM CARY’S NOTES; McCURDY’S MARINE HISTORY; THE FOSS BOOK; P.S.M.H.S.; OLD MARINE DIGEST MAGAZINES; OLD PACIFIC MOTOR BOAT AND PACIFIC WORK BOAT MAGAZINES.

WANTED:

1. CROWLEY DECALS AND CLOTH PATCHES FOR JACKETS OR CAPS. THE ONE I REALLY LIKE SAYS ‘RED STACK TUGS’.

2. OLD CARY-DAVIS & PUGET SOUND TUG & BARGE PHOTOS & ADVERTISEMENTS.

3. OLD CANNERY TENDER & LOG TOWING PHOTOS.

4. WE BUY OLD TUG AND WATERFRONT PHOTOS OR COLLECTIONS AND SNAP SHOTS. AS WELL AS OLD (PRE-1946) MARINE DIGEST MAGAZINES IN ANY CONDITION.

5.  INFORMATION WANTED: IN AN ARTICLE IN THE YACHTING MAGAZINE, IT STATED THAT DOC BOUGHT A TUG NAMED THE LEWIS II IN 1943. HE GOT HER FROM BELLINGHAM TUG AND BARGE AND I CAN’T SEEM TO TRACK HER DOWN.  ANY IDEAS?

THANKS TO EVERYONE WHO HELPS MARGIE AND I PUBLISH THIS NEWSLETTER. IT SURE IS FUN AND INTERESTING TO DO -ESPECIALLY WITH MY STEAM BACK.

ALL THE BEST FROM:

MARK & MARGIE FREEMAN, CAPTAINS ERIK & TOM, MISS BLUE, RICHIE, THE MARK FREEMAN MARITIME MUSEUM, TATOOSH TOWING & SALVAGE, FREMONT BOAT CO, FREMONT TUGBOAT CO. AND THE THREE CATS: BRAVEHEART, RAZZ AND BATMAN, [ALL THE CATS CAME FROM A NO-KILL SHELTER ABOUT 4 YEARS AGO].

P.S.: IF YOU WANT TO SEND ME AN E-MAIL PLEASE USE: mark@fremonttugboat.com     THANK YOU!  FAIRTIDE MARK.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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